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Keyword: paleontology

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  • US scientists may have resolved 'Darwin's dilemma'

    11/16/2014 8:04:49 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 260 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/15/2014 | By Matt Cantor
    Charles Darwin worried about a possible hole in his theory of evolution, but some American scientists may just have plugged it. For about a billion years after the dawn of life on Earth, organisms didn't evolve all that much. Then about 600 million years ago came the "Cambrian explosion." Everything changed relatively quickly, with all kinds of plants and animals emerging—which doesn't quite seem to fit with Darwin's theory of slow change, hence "Darwin's dilemma." Now, within a few days of each other, two new studies have appeared that could explain the shift, ABC News reports. One, by scientists at...
  • Insects were the first creatures to fly: study

    11/09/2014 4:52:04 AM PST · by Bettyprob · 27 replies
    Uncover California ^ | November 09, 2014 | Andrea Cordell
    An evolutionary insect family tree created by a team of 100 researchers revealed that insects were the first creatures to fly around 400 million years ago. The comprehensive insect family tree covering insects from all around the globe was created as part of a project called 1K Insect Transcriptome Evolution (1KITE). According to researchers involved in the 1KITE project, insects came into existence around 500 million years ago, around the same time when plants started to emerge on Earth's surface. And, it was roughly 406 million years ago, in the early part of Devonian era, when insects got wings and...
  • Low Oxygen on Earth May Have Held Up Animal Evolution

    11/07/2014 9:54:01 AM PST · by JimSEA · 19 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Rachel Feltman
    Why did complex life evolve precisely when it did? According to a new study, simpler life forms may have been waiting on a proper oxygen supply -- for as long as a billion years.
  • Newly discovered fossil could prove a problem for creationists

    11/07/2014 2:43:53 PM PST · by Alter Kaker · 250 replies
    Washington Post ^ | November 5, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    Researchers report that they've found the missing link between an ancient aquatic predator and its ancestors on land. Ichthyosaurs, the dolphin-like reptiles that lived in the sea during the time of the dinosaurs, evolved from terrestrial creatures that made their way back into the water over time. But the fossil record for the lineage has been spotty, without a clear link between land-based reptiles and the aquatic ichthyosaurs scientists know came after. Now, researchers report in Nature that they've found that link — an amphibious ancestor of the swimming ichthyosaurs named Cartorhynchus lenticarpus. "Many creationists have tried to portray ichthyosaurs...
  • Still Soft after 551 Million Years?

    10/26/2014 6:42:10 PM PDT · by lasereye · 16 replies
    ICR ^ | 2014 | Brian Thomas, M.S. *
    Original soft-tissue fossils continue to challenge mainstream understanding of how and when fossils formed. Secular researchers described dozens of them over the years, from mummified skin and dried red blood to still-purple retinas, and they assign them ages of tens of millions of years. However, the science of tissue decay clearly does not permit these long ages. For example, lab bench tests that accelerate tissue decay under high temperatures place a maximum age of fewer than one million years on some of the most resilient proteins, assuming the fossil proteins were kept cold and sterile during the entire process. These...
  • Rhinorex Condrupus: 75-Million-Year-Old Huge-Nosed 'Jimmy Durante' Dinosaur Discovered in Utah

    09/23/2014 11:59:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    International Business Times (UK) ^ | September 22, 2014 11:01 BST | By Lydia Smith
    Palaeontologists have discovered what they are calling the "Jimmy Durante" of dinosaurs, a type of hadrosaur with a distinctive nasal profile. Named Rhinorex condrupus, the fossil was found by researchers from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, and lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. According to National Geographic, the date places the creature in the middle of a major dinosaur radiation, the process by which species adapt to new ecological niches. Rhinorex, which translates roughly into "King Nose", was a plant-eater and a close relative of other Cretaceous...
  • T. Rex Confirmed As Great Grandaddy Of All Birds

    04/24/2008 1:37:14 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 3,796+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 4-24-2008 | Ewen Callaway
    T. rex confirmed as great granddaddy of all birds 19:00 24 April 2008 NewScientist.com news service Ewen Callaway John Asara, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Mary Schweitzer, North Carolina State University Thomas Holtz, University of Maryland Tyrannosaurus rex, meet the chicken – your third cousin more than 100 million years removed. A new family tree based on protein sequences recovered from dinosaur fossils firms up the dinosaur's avian lineage. "Palaeontologists have known this overall connection. We have now confirmed it with molecular data," says John Asara, a biochemist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, who led the study....
  • Ancient Birds Flew On All Fours

    09/22/2006 6:27:23 AM PDT · by Tokra · 181 replies · 2,650+ views
    eurekalert ^ | Spet. 22, 2006 | Nick Longrich
    The earliest known ancestor of modern-day birds took to the skies by gliding from trees using primitive feathered wings on their arms and legs, according to new research by a University of Calgary paleontologist. In a paper published in the journal Paleobiology, Department of Biological Sciences PhD student Nick Longrich challenges the idea that birds began flying by taking off from the ground while running and shows that the dinosaur-like bird Archaeopteryx soared using wing-like feathers on all of its limbs. "The discussions about the origins of avian flight have been dominated by the so-called 'ground up' and 'trees down'...
  • Discovery of the Oldest-Known Ceratopsian, an Ancestor of Triceratops and Other Horned Dinosaurs

    08/24/2006 10:49:15 PM PDT · by Virginia-American · 27 replies · 943+ views
    George Washington University Press Release ^ | May 16, 2006 | Wendy Carey, Matt Lindsay
    GW PROFESSOR JAMES M. CLARK LEADS DISCOVERY OF THE OLDEST-KNOWN CERATOPSIAN, AN ANCESTOR OF TRICERATOPS AND OTHER HORNED DINOSAURS New Find is Evolutionary Link Between Ceratopsians and Pachycephalosaurs, the "Bone-Headed" Dinosaurs WASHINGTON -- James M. Clark, Ronald B. Weintraub Associate Professor of Biology at The George Washington University, and Xu Xing of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing, have discovered the oldest-known ceratopsian, a finding that solidifies the close evolutionary evidence between ceratopsians and pachycephalosarians, the "bone-headed" dinosaurs. Roaming the earth 160 million years ago, the new basal ceratopsian dinosaur, Yinlong downsi, appeared 20 million years...
  • Dover, PA Evolution Trial [daily thread for 07 Oct]

    10/07/2005 7:23:15 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 456 replies · 4,761+ views
    York Daily Record ^ | 07 October 2005 | Staff
    To keep this all in one daily thread, here are links to two articles in the York Daily Record (with excerpts from each), which has been doing a great job of reporting on the trial: Forrest cross-examination a rambling wonder. About the time that Richard Thompson, head law guy at the Thomas More center and chief defender of the Dover Area School Board, started his third year of cross-examination of philosopher Barbara Forrest, it was easy to imagine that at that moment, everyone in the courtroom, including Forrest, who doesn’t believe in God, was violating the separation of church and...
  • Hunters Claim to Find 4-Winged Dinosaur

    01/22/2003 11:38:37 AM PST · by Dallas · 56 replies · 748+ views
    Fossil hunters in China have discovered what may be one of the weirdest prehistoric species ever seen -- a four-winged dinosaur that apparently glided from tree to tree. The 128-million-year-old animal -- called Microraptor gui, in honor of Chinese paleontologist Gu Zhiwei -- was about 2 1/2 feet long and had two sets of feathered wings, with one set on its forelimbs and the other on its hind legs. Exactly where the creature fits into the evolution of birds and dinosaurs is not clear. But researchers speculated that it developed around the same time as or even later than...
  • Jurassic 'squirrels' push back clock on emergence of mammals

    09/17/2014 5:26:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 10, 2014 | Pete Spotts
    In placing three newly discovered species along the mammal family tree, researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago... Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs. In placing these creatures along the mammal family tree, the researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago, during the Triassic period. If the results hold up to additional scrutiny, they imply a...
  • Ancient swamp creature had lips like Mick Jagger

    09/10/2014 10:14:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by Duke University
    Sir Mick Jagger has a new animal named after him. Scientists have named an extinct swamp-dwelling creature that lived 19 million years ago in Africa after the Rolling Stones frontman, in honor of a trait they both share—their supersized lips. "We gave it the scientific name Jaggermeryx naida, which translates to 'Jagger's water nymph,'" said study co-author Ellen Miller of Wake Forest University. The animal's fossilized jaw bones suggest it was roughly the size of a small deer and akin to a cross between a slender hippo and a long-legged pig. Researchers uncovered the fossils—consisting of multiple jawbone fragments—amid the...
  • Newly discovered dinosaur, Dreadnoughtus, takes title of largest terrestrial animal

    09/05/2014 8:11:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 4, 2014 | Meeri Kim
    Scientists have discovered the fossilized remains of a new long-necked, long-tailed dinosaur that has taken the crown for largest terrestrial animal with a body mass that can be accurately determined. Measurements of bones from its hind leg and foreleg revealed that the animal was 65 tons, and still growing when it died in the Patagonian hills of Argentina about 77 million years ago. “To put this in perspective, an African elephant is about five tons, T. rex is eight tons, Diplodocus is 18 tons, and a Boeing 737 is around 50 tons,” said study author and paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara at...
  • "Astoundingly huge" dinosaur skeleton unearthed in Argentina

    09/04/2014 11:29:26 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    CBS News ^ | September 4, 2014 | Agata Blaszczak-Boxe
    Scientists have unearthed the skeleton of a previously unknown, massive dinosaur species that may be the largest land animal ever found.The specimen named Dreadnoughtus schrani is exceptionally complete, with about 70 percent of its bones recovered. Scientists believe the creature, which lived about 77 million years ago, measured 85 feet (26 meters) long and weighed about 65 tons, heavier than a Boeing 737.
  • Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

    08/20/2014 9:14:51 PM PDT · by null and void · 47 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Tue, 08/19/2014 - 3:08pm | University of Cambridge
    Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian InstituteThe spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical...
  • West US cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    07/27/2014 1:48:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 24, 2014 | unattributed
    For the first time in three decades, paleontologists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: The bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave. Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming is 85 feet (25 meters) deep and almost impossible to see until you're standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals—including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahs—shared the misfortune of not noticing the 15-foot-wide (4 meters) opening until they were plunging to their deaths. Now, the U.S. Bureau...
  • Prehistoric animal remains discovered in U.S.

    08/09/2014 12:18:58 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 12 replies
    abc 25 wpbf ^ | 8-9-2014 | By Jareen Imam
    The cave is cool and damp -- prefect for preserving prehistoric remains, Meachen says. "It's like a refrigerator in there, and probably has been for 20,000 years," she said. "Some of the bones we're finding there have collagen in them. That is where you could get the ancient DNA." The scientists saw bones falling out of a part of the cave, and decided to start digging there. "That was the fossil layer," she said. "There is so much to dig. We have two more years for funding that we can be out there, so we are going to try to...
  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • Researchers find first sign that tyrannosaurs hunted in packs

    07/27/2014 6:46:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday 23 July 2014 | Ian Sample
    The collective noun is a terror of tyrannosaurs: a pack of the prehistoric predators, moving and hunting in numbers, for prey that faced the fight of its life. That tyrannosaurs might have hunted in groups has long been debated by dinosaur experts, but with so little to go on, the prospect has remained firmly in the realm of speculation. But researchers in Canada now claim to have the strongest evidence yet that the ancient beasts did move around in packs. At a remote site in north-east British Columbia - in the west of Canada - they uncovered the first known...
  • Native Americans KILLED AND ATE DUMBO, say archaeologists

    07/15/2014 1:27:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 15 Jul 2014 | Lewis Page,
    The primitive folk assessed by many archaeologists as being the original native Americans – that is, the Clovis people – killed and ate the lovable prehistoric elephants that inhabited the continent alongside them, scientists say. The proto-dumbo species in question is known as the gomphothere. Until recently, it had been thought that gomphotheres had disappeared from North America well before human beings showed up, but new fossil evidence appears to show that at least one cuddly tusker was brutally killed by Clovis people around 13,400 years ago. The luckless pachyderm was then scoffed by its peckish assailants. "This is the...
  • Study: Fossil soaring bird had huge wingspan

    07/08/2014 8:57:10 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 36 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 7, 2014 3:12 PM EDT | Malcolm Ritter
    A fossil found in South Carolina has revealed a gigantic bird that apparently snatched fish while soaring over the ocean some 25 million to 28 million years ago. Its estimated wingspan of around 21 feet is bigger than the height of a giraffe. …
  • Mapping Pterosaurs on Google Earth

    06/30/2014 12:45:21 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Live Science ^ | 6-29-2014 | Pappas
    Want to find the nearest pterosaur? There's an app for that — or a database, at least. A newly developed website catalogs more than 1,300 specimens of extinct flying reptiles called pterosaurs, thus enabling users to map out the ancient creatures on Google Earth. The goal is to help researchers find trends in the evolution and diversity of these ancient winged reptiles. "Having a very specific database like this, which is just for looking at individual fossil specimens of pterosaurs, is very helpful, because you can ask questions that you couldn't have answered with bigger databases [of more animals]," said...
  • Bachelor party makes impressive fossil discovery in Elephant Butte

    06/11/2014 2:45:14 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 26 replies
    KRQE Via Yahoo Odd News ^ | 6/11/14 | Will Lerner
    Elephant Butte is a small city in New Mexico that calls itself the “Diamond in the Desert.” As KRQE News 13 reports, it was in this scenic location that a group of friends celebrating a bachelor party made an astonishing find – a giant fossil of the tusk and skull of what’s believed to be a Stegomastodon. According to the University of Nebraska State Museum, Stegomastodons were, “the last surviving member of a lineage of primitive tuskers called ‘gomphotheres’ which first entered North America 15 million years ago.”
  • 'Biggest dinosaur ever' discovered

    05/17/2014 10:54:58 AM PDT · by Izzy Dunne · 100 replies
    BBC ^ | 16 May 2014 | James Morgan
    Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall. Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder, Argentinosaurus. Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period. A local farm worker first stumbled on the remains in the desert near La Flecha, about 250km (135 miles) west of Trelew, Patagonia.
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies · 1,261+ views
    It’s a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • New Fossil Links Four-legged Land Animals To Ancient Fish

    04/02/2004 4:25:18 PM PST · by PatrickHenry · 455 replies · 1,130+ views
    National Science Foundation ^ | 01 April 2004 | Staff
    Arlington, Va.—How land-living animals evolved from fish has long been a scientific puzzle. A key missing piece has been knowledge of how the fins of fish transformed into the arms and legs of our ancestors. In this week's issue of the journal Science, paleontologists Neil Shubin and Michael Coates from the University of Chicago and Ted Daeschler from the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, describe a remarkable fossil that bridges the gap between fish and amphibian and provides a glimpse of the structure and function changes from fin to limb. The fossil, a 365-million-year-old arm bone, or humerus, shares...
  • Dinosaur creche was a no-frills business [123 myr old PsitTACOsaurus fossils in lava floe]

    09/21/2007 8:48:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 24+ views
    The Times ^ | September 20, 2007 | Lewis Smith, Environment Reporter
    A dinosaur creche has been found entombed in the volcanic debris that engulfed it on a hillside 123 million years ago. Six young Psittacosaurus, all less than three years old, died side by side. It is the earliest known dinosaur nursery... Paul Barrett, of the Natural History Museum in London, one of the researchers, said that the fossilised juveniles appeared to have formed a creche but it was impossible to be sure if they were part of a larger herd or if they grouped together for protection. "This is the first time we've found a group of these dinosaurs together....
  • 'Kitchen science' reveals dinosaurs died in agony

    06/06/2007 9:45:09 PM PDT · by my_pointy_head_is_sharp · 33 replies · 2,073+ views
    sfgate.com ^ | June 6, 2007 | David Perlman, Chronicle Science Editor
    A dinosaur mystery that puzzled paleontologists for nearly a century has been solved by a pound of beef tendons from a butcher, a collection of dead hawks and a brace of frozen quail, two investigative scientists in Berkeley and Idaho say. The puzzle: Why were fossils of those ancient creatures so often discovered buried with their heads, necks and feet arched bizarrely backward into a distorted posture unlike anything seen alive? The answer: Kevin Padian, a noted dinosaur expert and curator of the Museum of Paleontology at UC Berkeley, and Cynthia Marshall Faux, a veterinarian and paleontologist at the Museum...
  • Jaws, the prequel: Scientists find the ‘Model T Ford’ of sharks

    04/19/2014 11:53:13 PM PDT · by blueplum · 14 replies
    Reuters ^ | April 16, 2014 6:24PM EDT | Will Dunham
    (Reuters) - You've heard of the Model T Ford, the famed early 20th-century automobile that was the forerunner of the modern car. But how about the Model T shark? Scientists on Wednesday announced the discovery of the impeccably preserved fossilized remains of a shark that lived 325 million years ago in what is now Arkansas, complete with a series of cartilage arches that supported its gills and jaws. :snip: Employing sophisticated equipment at the European Synchrotron in France, the scientists used high-resolution X-rays to obtain a detailed view of the shape and organization of the arches and associated structures. They...
  • 'Paleo Ale' Brewed From Yeast Found On A 40-Million-Year-Old Whale Fossil

    04/19/2014 2:41:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Popular Science ^ | April Fools' Day, 2014 | Francie Diep
    The beer will be called Bone Dusters Paleo Ale (Hardy har har [Okay, actually, "paleo ale" is pretty good]). The yeast come from the surface of one of the oldest marine mammal fossils ever discovered in the western hemisphere. The idea for the beer came from Jason Osborne, who co-directs a nonprofit dedicated to advancing paleontology and geology. A paleo beer, Osborne thought, would be a great hook to interest non-scientists in fossils. I think many non-scientists are quite interested in fossils already, but I cannot argue against a paleo beer. Will whale-fossil beer really taste that different from other...
  • Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood (46 Million Years OLD)

    10/14/2013 8:54:39 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies
    BI ^ | 10-14-2013 | Jennifer Welsh
    Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood Jennifer Welsh Oct. 14, 2013, 5:37 PMBlood engorged mosquito Researchers have just published an exciting find: a 46-million-year-old mosquito full of blood. Next stop "Jurassic Park"? Not so fast. The find is really interesting because it's the first example of blood-feeding in these ancient insects. We hadn't had clear evidence of when this began until now. They found the mosquito in shale sediments in Montana. They first found the presence of iron in the female mosquito's belly, then used a non-destructive technique to study the molecules inside the find. They...
  • New Fossils Suggest Ancient Cat-sized Reptiles in Antarctica

    06/07/2008 7:53:24 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 36 replies · 222+ views
    LiveScience.com on Yahoo ^ | 6/7/08 | Jeanna Bryner
    Cat-sized reptiles once roamed what is now the icebox of Antarctica, snuggling up in burrows and peeping above ground to snag plant roots and insects. The evidence for this scenario comes from preserved burrow casts discovered in the Transantarctic Mountains, which extend 3,000 miles (4,800 km) across the polar continent and contain layers of rock dating back 400 million years. "We've got good evidence that these burrows were made by land-dwelling animals rather than crayfish," said lead researcher Christian Sidor, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Washington and curator at UW's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. Ancient...
  • Scientists find 800,000-year-old footprints in UK

    02/08/2014 10:55:20 AM PST · by artichokegrower · 29 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | February 7, 2014 | JILL LAWLESS
    LONDON (AP) — They were a British family on a day out — almost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years old — the most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in northern Europe.
  • New dinosaur called the Chicken From Hell

    03/20/2014 6:15:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 49 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 19, 2014 | Joel Achenbach
    Scientists have discovered a freakish, birdlike species of dinosaur — 11 feet long, 500 pounds, with a beak, no teeth, a bony crest atop its head, murderous claws, prize-fighter arms, spindly legs, a thin tail and feathers sprouting all over the place. Officially, it’s a member of a group of dinosaurs called oviraptorosaurs. Unofficially, it’s the Chicken From Hell.
  • Genesis Science Is Practical, Not Just Academic

    03/14/2014 7:27:01 AM PDT · by fishtank · 10 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | March 2014 | James Johnson
    Genesis Science Is Practical, Not Just Academic by James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. * “It doesn’t really matter, in the real world, what you believe about creation or evolution,” the college student glibly challenged me. “Whether the evolutionists are right or whether Genesis is right makes no practical difference in how science works or in how people live their lives.” With a grin and a wave of his hand, the sophomore dismissed the real-world relevance of biblical creation as if it were no more practical than evolutionary myths. Was he correct? Is the Genesis record of God’s creation (and...
  • China's 'Jurassic Park' yields feathered dinosaurs, earliest swimming mammal & strange salamanders

    03/10/2014 10:22:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | March 6, 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    A 'Jurassic Park' in China was once home to dinosaurs that lived among early mammals, amphibians and other strange creatures 160 million years ago. The extraordinary fossil bed contains the bones of pterosaurs - early mammals – including the first known swimming mammal with a beaver-like tail, the earliest gliding mammal and feathered dinosaurs. Their remarkably preserved remains were discovered in rocks beneath the Jehol Biota in north eastern China - a famous collection of 130 million-year-old fossils from the Cretaceous Period. The latest discovery sheds light on life in the Middle-Upper Jurassic 30million years earlier when birds are believed...
  • Scientists find dinosaur that was scourge of Jurassic Europe

    03/06/2014 6:37:05 AM PST · by C19fan · 23 replies
    Reuters ^ | March 5, 2014 | Will Dunham
    In Europe 150 million years ago, this dude was the biggest, baddest bully in town. Two scientists in Portugal announced on Wednesday that they have identified the largest carnivorous dinosaur ever found in Europe, a 33-foot-long (10-meter-long) brute called Torvosaurus gurneyi that was the scourge of its domain in the Jurassic Period.
  • Ancient bison allows scientists to travel back in time - 9,000 years

    03/04/2014 8:01:25 AM PST · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 3-1-2014 | Anastasia Longinova
    Exclusive pictures show autopsy on a four year old bison preserved in ice since ancient times. The autopsy, conducted on 27 February 2014, is understood to be the first in the world on a 9,000 bison, and it could provide vital scientific information. The creature was found in exceptional condition in July 2011 by Yukagir community members in the Sakha Republic, also known as Yakutia, where mammoth remains were also found. This bison, dating from 9,000 years ago, was located on the shore of a lake in the north of Ust-Yana district. The body became visible after a part of...
  • Crystal is 'oldest scrap of Earth crust'

    02/24/2014 7:56:24 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 50 replies
    bbc ^ | 24 February 2014
    A tiny 4.4-billion-year-old crystal has been confirmed as the oldest fragment of Earth's crust. The zircon was found in sandstone in the Jack Hills region of Western Australia. Scientists dated the crystal by studying its uranium and lead atoms. The former decays into the latter very slowly over time and can be used like a clock. The finding has been reported in the journal Nature Geoscience. Its implication is that Earth had formed a solid crust much sooner after its formation 4.6 billion years ago than was previously thought, and very quickly following the great collision with a Mars-sized body...
  • Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints In UK

    02/07/2014 3:10:44 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies
    phys.org/news ^ | 2-7-2014 | Jill Lawless
    Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Footprints Inn UK (Update) Jill LawlessFebuary 7, 2014Undated handout photo issued by the British Museum Friday Feb. 7, 2014 of some of the human footprints, thought to be more than 800,000 years old, found in silt on the beach at Happisburgh on the Norfolk coast of England, with a camera lens …They were a British family on a day out—almost a million years ago. Archaeologists announced Friday that they have discovered human footprints in England that are between 800,000 and 1 million years old—the most ancient found outside Africa, and the earliest evidence of human life in...
  • The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

    12/19/2013 12:22:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 56 replies
    The Scientist ^ | December 18, 2013 | Ruth Williams
    A high-quality genome sequence obtained from a female Neanderthal toe bone reveals that the individual’s parents were close relatives and that such inbreeding was prevalent among her recent ancestors, according to a paper published today (December 18) in Nature. But the sequence also reveals that interbreeding occurred between Neanderthals and other hominin groups, including early modern humans. “Did humans evolve like a constantly branching tree? A lot of people think so,” said Milford Wolpoff, a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, who was not involved in the study. “But there’s also been this thread of thought, by some...
  • Was Your Ancestor a Ball of Jelly? Evolution Study Surprises Experts

    12/19/2013 11:18:26 AM PST · by EveningStar · 25 replies
    National Geographic ^ | December 12, 2013 | Jane J. Lee
    In a prehistoric version of "the chicken or the egg" question, researchers have long debated which animal group came first. A traditional view pegs sponges—marine creatures that look more like rocks or corals—as our ancient ancestors. But a new genetic study is stirring the waters, suggesting comb jellies, gelatinous marine animals that look similar to jellyfish, are actually the first animals to have evolved over 600 million years ago.
  • Pompeii-like volcanic ash kept dinosaur remains fresh

    02/04/2014 7:44:58 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 02/04/2014 | Jeff Hecht
    It's hot storage. Millions of years before volcanic ash entombed the Roman town of Pompeii, a group of dinosaurs succumbed to a similar fate. China's famous feathered dinosaur fossils owe their exquisite preservation to volcanic eruptions between about 130 and 120 million years ago. The Jehol fossils have transformed our understanding of dinosaurs by showing that the relatives of Velociraptor and T. rex had a feather-like body covering, like birds. The Jehol deposits also preserved soft tissue from early mammals and flowering plants. Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University, China, and his colleagues think they know why the remains are so...
  • Maybe an Asteroid Didn't Kill the Dinosaurs

    05/09/2009 2:45:01 PM PDT · by antiunion person · 30 replies · 1,828+ views
    Time CNN ^ | Monday, Apr. 27, 2009 | Jeffrey Kluger
    When a scientific principle is common knowledge even in grammar school, you know it has long since crossed the line from theory to established fact. That's the case with dinosaur extinction. Some 65 million years ago — as we've all come to know — an asteroid struck the earth, sending up a cloud that blocked the sun and cooled the planet. That, in turn, wiped out the dinosaurs and made way for the rise of mammals. The suddenness with which so many species vanished after that time always suggested a single cataclysmic event, and the 1978 discovery of a 112-mile,...
  • Whales, ostrich evolved in India

    12/09/2005 11:59:17 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies · 556+ views
    The Times of India (Lucknow) ^ | 12/09/2005 | Staff
    LUCKNOW: "Do you know that the evolution of mighty whales took place in India around 55 million years before present. And, though the Ostrich is not found in India anymore, but according to scientists, the bird also evolved here about 12 million years before present. Interestingly, these facts are part of a science curriculum in the West, but Indian students are largely unaware of the same. This was revealed by Ashok Sahni, emeritus professor, Chandigarh University, in his lecture delivered at a seminar on "Northward Flight of India in the Mesozoic - Cenozoic: Consequences on Biotic Changes and Basin Evolution",...
  • Double meteorite strike 'caused dinosaur extinction'

    08/27/2010 12:05:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies
    BBC ^ | Howard Falcon-Lang
    The dinosaurs were wiped out 65 million years ago by at least two meteorite impacts, rather than a single strike, a new study suggests.Previously, scientists had identified a huge impact crater in the Gulf of Mexico as the event that spelled doom for the dinosaurs. Now evidence for a second impact in the Ukraine has been uncovered. This raises the possibility that the Earth may have been bombarded by a whole shower of meteorites. The new findings are published in the journal Geology by a team lead by Professor David Jolley of Aberdeen University. When first proposed in 1980, the...
  • Oldest dinosaur nursery found in South Africa

    01/24/2012 12:37:19 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 20 replies
    zeenews ^ | January 24, 2012 | ANI
    An ancient dinosaur nursery - the oldest nesting site ever found - has been unearthed in an excavation at a site in South Africa. The 190-million-year-old nesting site of the prosauropod dinosaur Massospondylus reveals significant clues about the evolution of complex reproductive behaviour in early dinosaurs. It discover clutches of eggs, many with embryos, as well as tiny dinosaur footprints, providing the oldest known evidence that the hatchlings remained at the nesting site long enough to at least double in size. “This research project, which has been ongoing since 2005 continues to produce groundbreaking results and excavations continue. First it...
  • Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests

    10/25/2006 3:33:16 PM PDT · by blam · 94 replies · 2,818+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-24-2006 | GSA
    Source: Geological Society of America Date: October 24, 2006 Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests There's growing evidence that the dinosaurs and most their contemporaries were not wiped out by the famed Chicxulub meteor impact, according to a paleontologist who says multiple meteor impacts, massive volcanism in India, and climate changes culminated in the end of the Cretaceous Period. Cottonmouth Creek waterfall over the event deposit with reworked Chicxulub impact spherules. The original Chicxulub ejecta layer was discovered in a yellow clay layer 45 cm below the base of the event deposit. The yellow clay represents a...
  • It's Official: An Asteroid Wiped Out the Dinosaurs

    03/05/2010 5:46:05 AM PST · by jilliane · 95 replies · 1,368+ views
    Reuters ^ | 03/05/2010 | Kate Kelland
    A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades.