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Keyword: paleontology

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  • 'Descendents Of Dragon' Confirmed At Laiohe River Valley

    02/26/2004 12:30:26 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 1,717+ views
    Peoples Daily ^ | 2-26-2004
    'Descendants of the Dragon' confirmed at the Liaohe River ValleyIn thousands of years, the Chinese people have been deeming themselves as "the descendant of the dragon" though there is no enough solid proof to support the statement. But in this year, with continually findings of dragons in archeological work at the Liaohe River Valley, the statement that the Chinese people are "the descendant of the dragon" is further confirmed. In thousands of years, the Chinese people have been deeming themselves as "the descendant of the dragon" though there is no enough solid proof to support the statement. But in this...
  • Archaeologist: Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Gobi desert

    06/23/2016 11:33:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science & Scholarship in Poland ^ | June 10, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebiowski (PAP) [szz/zan/mrt]
    Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Mongolian Gobi desert... Archaeologists found many traces of old camps... located on the shores of lakes - now dried. Based on the findings, researchers concluded that thousands of years ago richness of species of animals lived in the study area, benefiting the ancient inhabitants of the desert. Archaeologists discovered mainly stone tools and the waste associated with their production... The oldest finds are represented by a massive stone tools made by the Middle Palaeolithic communities (200 thousand - 40 thousand years ago). Archaeologists have also discovered smaller stone products from later...
  • The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs almost got us, too

    06/29/2016 10:26:05 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 30 replies
    THE WEEK ^ | June 28, 2016 | Joshua A. Krisch
    The age of the dinosaurs ended 66 million years ago, when an asteroid six miles in diameter crashed into what is now southeastern Mexico. The world went up in flames. Dinosaurs, along with the massive reptiles that ruled the sea and the sky, perished as forest fires raged across the globe, dust blotted out the sun, and Earth experienced intense heat, frigid cooling, and then more heat. Conventional wisdom states that mammalian diversity emerged from the ashes of the mass extinction, ultimately giving rise to our own humble species. But according to a study in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology,...
  • Modulation of Ice Ages via Precession and Dust-Albedo Feedbacks

    06/28/2016 5:00:32 PM PDT · by norwaypinesavage · 21 replies
    Watts Up With That ^ | June 28, 2016 | Ralph Ellis
    CO2 is only a bit-player in the drama of world climate, while the main characters are ice, dust and albedo....Ice age cycles have something to do with precession: the slow wobble of the axis of the Earth. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks knew of precession and called it the Great Year, because it gives warm and cool seasons over its approximate 23,000-year cycle. But there is a problem with invoking the Great Year as the regulator of ice ages, because we should really get an interglacial warming every 23,000 years or so. And we don’t – they only happen every...
  • Did a supernova two million years ago brighten the night sky and give our ancestors cancer?

    06/17/2016 4:22:29 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | June 17, 2016 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    Millions of years ago, a series of nearby supernovae sent radiation and debris raining down to Earth. The events left traces of radioactive iron-60 embedded in the sea floor and even on the Moon, and now, researchers are saying they may have had life-altering effects on the early inhabitants of our planet. At just hundreds of light-years away, two major stellar explosions may have spurred changes to the environment, and even increased the rates of cancer and mutation.
  • Ancient DNA Shows Perfect Storm Felled Ice Age Giants

    06/18/2016 2:53:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Friday, June 17, 2016 | University of Adelaide, Alan Cooper et al
    "Patagonia turns out to be the Rosetta Stone - it shows that human colonisation didn't immediately result in extinctions, but only as long as it stayed cold," says study leader Professor Alan Cooper, ACAD Director. "Instead, more than 1000 years of human occupation passed before a rapid warming event occurred, and then the megafauna were extinct within a hundred years." The researchers, including from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of New South Wales and University of Magallanes in Patagonia, studied ancient DNA extracted from radiocarbon-dated bones and teeth found in caves across Patagonia, and Tierra del Fuego, to trace...
  • Current Diversity Pattern Of North American Mammals A 'Recent' Trend, Study Finds

    06/18/2016 3:05:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 13, 2016 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    It's called the latitudinal diversity gradient, a phenomenon seen today in most plant and animal species around the world: Biodiversity decreases from the equator to higher latitudes. A new study of fossils representing 63 million of the past 65 million years reveals that -- for North American mammals, at least -- the modern LDG is the exception rather than the rule. The findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, point to the importance of not assuming that the way things are today is the way they've always been, the researchers say... It may seem obvious that...
  • New Cretaceous Fossils Shed Light On The Early Evolution Of Ants

    06/18/2016 2:33:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | May 30, 2016 | Current Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    The vast majority of Cretaceous ants belong to stem-group Formicidae and comprise workers and reproductives of largely generalized morphologies... recent discoveries from the Cretaceous suggest relatively advanced social levels. Remarkable exceptions to this pattern of generalized morphologies are ants with bizarre mouthparts in which both female castes have modified heads and bladelike mandibles that uniquely move in a horizontal rather than vertical plane... with the mandibles apparently acting as traps triggered by sensory hairs in a way distinct from that of modern trap-jaw ants... some of the most effective predatory ants are solitary hunters with powerful trap jaws... Dr. WANG...
  • Popcorn-like fossils provide evidence of environmental impacts on species numbers

    06/11/2016 5:42:04 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 6/10/2016 | University of Southampton
    The number of species that can exist on Earth depends on how the environment changes, according to new research led by the University of Southampton. By analysing the fossil record of microscopic aquatic creatures called planktonic foraminifera, whose fossil remains now resemble miniaturised popcorn and date back millions of years, the research provided the first statistical evidence that environmental changes put a cap on species richness. Dr Ezard added: "We used mathematical models to reveal how environmental changes influence both the rate of diversification among species and how many species can co-exist at once. Our results suggest that the world...
  • New Fossils Hint 'Hobbit' Humans Are Older Than Thought

    06/08/2016 7:56:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    National Geographic ^ | June 8, 2016 | Adam Hoffman
    For the past decade, a fossil human relative about the size of a toddler has loomed large in the story of our evolutionary history. This mysterious creature—found on the Indonesian island of Flores—has sparked a heated debate about its origins, including questions over its classification as a unique species. But now, a scattering of teeth and bone may at last unlock the mystery of the “hobbits,” also known as Homo floresiensis. The 700,000-year-old human remains are the first found outside Liang Bua cave, the site on Flores that yielded the original hobbit fossils. The much older samples show intriguing similarities...
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Prehistoric peepers give vital clue in solving 300 million year old 'Tully Monster'

    04/13/2016 4:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/12/2016 | University of Leicester
    A 300 million year-old fossil mystery has been solved by a research team led by the University of Leicester, which has identified that the ancient 'Tully Monster' was a vertebrate -- due to the unique characteristics of its eyes. Tullimonstrum gregarium or as it is more commonly known the 'Tully Monster', found only in coal quarries in Illinois, Northern America, is known to many Americans because its alien-like image can be seen on the sides of large U-haul™ trailers which ply the freeways. Despite being an iconic image -- a fossil with a striped body, large tail, a pair of...
  • Megalodons were wiped out when killer whales invaded: Competition for food drove 60ft sharks [tr]

    03/31/2016 11:34:01 AM PDT · by C19fan · 47 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 31, 2016 | Abigail Beall
    Jaws may have terrified you at the cinema, but the iconic great white would have been dwarfed by Carcharocles megalodon, the largest shark in the history of the planet. The giant creatures lived between 23 million and 2.6 million years ago and scientists are divided over how and why the species perished. Now, details of fossils from the huge shark that lived alongside the dinosaurs have been studied for the first time in an attempt to solve this mystery.
  • Scientists may have discovered 12,000 year old mother's milk, frozen in permafrost

    03/31/2016 5:54:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | March 21, 2016 | reporter
    The carcass of one of a pair of extinct big cat cubs will be scrutinised this autumn with the realistic possibility that a liquid found in the remains of the animal is milk from the mother. Separately, it was recently revealed that samples of the prehistoric infant are being examined by South Korean to clone an animal that once occupied Eurasia from modern day Great Britain to the extreme east of Russia. A source close to the case told The Siberian Times that there is 'hope' the frozen remains of a cave lion cub will show evidence of its mother's...
  • Dwarf hippo fossils found on Cyprus

    12/05/2007 4:35:23 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 19 replies · 398+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 12/5/07 | Menelaos Hadjicostis - ap
    AYIA NAPA, Cyprus - An abattoir used by early Cypriots, a place where animals went to die, or a shelter that ultimately proved a death trap? Cypriot and Greek scientists are studying a collapsed cave filled with the fossilized remains of extinct dwarf hippopotamuses — descendants of hippos believed to have reached the island a quarter-million years ago. Paleontologists have unearthed an estimated 80 dwarf hippos in recent digs at the site just outside the resort of Ayia Napa on the island's southeastern coast. Hundreds more may lie beneath an exposed layer of jumbled fossils. Scientists hope the fossil haul,...
  • World's Oldest Art Uncovered in Germany

    12/20/2003 10:06:34 AM PST · by Lessismore · 15 replies · 297+ views
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 19.12.2003
    Archeologists working on a dig in the southern German province of Swabia have unearthed what they claim to be the oldest statue in the history of art. The three little figurines carved from mammoth bone were discovered in a cave in Southern Germany, and are so intricate in their design that archeologists believe they could change our understanding of the imaginative power of early man's mind. The artifacts date back between 30,000 and 33,000 years, to a time when some of modern humans' earliest relatives populated the European continent. The incredible discovery was made during a dig headed by U.S....
  • Scientists attempt to clone Ice Age Lion Cubs

    03/06/2016 3:19:44 AM PST · by PIF · 26 replies
    The Mirror (UK) ^ | 19:22, 4 Mar 2016 Updated 14:16, 5 Mar 2016 | Rhian Lubin
    Two cubs were found in Russia's Sakha Republic last August in a near-perfect state thanks to the deep-freeze conditions where they lay. Scientists are attempting to clone extinct Ice Age lion cubs by finding DNA in the remains of the creatures. Researchers hope to find living tissues containing DNA in the remains, which will allow them to recreate the now extinct Ice Age cave lion. The 12,000-year-old cave lion cubs were found frozen in ice last year- so well preserved their whiskers are still bristling. The pair of prehistoric predators, named Uyan and Dina, are the most unspoilt examples of...
  • Lion man takes pride of place as oldest statue: 30,000-year-old carving

    09/05/2003 2:50:57 AM PDT · by gd124 · 19 replies · 9,628+ views
    Nature ^ | 4 September 2003 | REX DALTON
    Lion man takes pride of place as oldest statue 30,000-year-old carving might be work of Neanderthals or modern humans. Intricate ivory carvings said to be the oldest known examples of figurative art have been uncovered in a cave in southwestern Germany. Researchers say that the finding could change our understanding of early man's imaginative endeavours. The artefacts - including a figurine depicting a Lowenmensch ('lion man') - have been carbon-dated to around 30,000 years ago, when some of the earliest known relatives of modern humans populated Europe. Discovered last year by a team led by US archaeologist Nicholas Conard of...
  • Unicorn Fossil origins in China Confirmed (Photos)

    06/28/2013 9:10:16 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    Examiner ^ | JUNE 22, 2013 | Paul Hamaker
    The original unicorn was actually an ancient rhinoceros according to research conducted by Dr. Tao Deng from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences that was presented in the June 21, 2013, issue of the Chinese Science Bulletin. The fossils of the first ever discovered skull of Sinotherium lagrelii were found in the Linxia Basin in northwestern China and date to the Late Miocene about seven million years ago.
  • Ancient “Monster” Insect Found

    10/29/2009 10:40:11 AM PDT · by null and void · 17 replies · 1,332+ views
    Ancient “Monster” Insect Found Fly in amber: This ancient "unicorn" fly that lived 100 million years ago in Burma has a "horn" in the center of its forehead, capped with three small eyes. Courtesy of George Poinar Researchers have announced the discovery of a new, real-world “monster” — what they are calling a “unicorn” fly — that lived about 100 million years ago and is being described as a new family, genus and species of fly never before observed. A single, incredibly well-preserved specimen of the tiny but scary-looking fly was preserved for eternity in Burmese amber. It had...
  • A fossilised skull has revealed when the last 'Siberian unicorn' lived on Earth

    03/28/2016 1:54:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 27 MAR 2016 | JOSH HRALA
    For decades, scientists have estimated that the Siberian unicorn - a long-extinct species of mammal that looked more like a rhino than a horse - died out some 350,000 years ago, but a beautifully preserved skull found in Kazakhstan has completely overturned that assumption. Turns out, these incredible creatures were still around as recently as 29,000 years ago. Before we talk about the latest discovery, yes, there was a very real 'unicorn' that roamed Earth tens of thousands of years ago, but it was nothing like the one found in your favourite children’s book. (Sorry - it’s a bummer for...
  • Oz dino bone defies drift theory

    06/13/2008 7:36:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 148+ views
    AFP ^ | June 12, 2008 | unattributed
    A dinosaur bone discovered in Australia has defied prevailing wisdom about how the world's continents separated from a super-continent millions of years ago, a new study said. The 19-centimetre bone was found in southeastern Australia but it comes from a very close cousin to Megaraptor, a flesh-ripping monster that lorded over swathes of South American some 90 million years ago. The extraordinary similarity between the two giant theropods adds weight to a dissident view about the break-up of a super-continent, known as Gondwana, that formed the continents of the southern hemisphere, the authors said on Tuesday. Gondwana broke up during...
  • Did Neutrinos Kill The Dinosaurs?

    03/25/2016 6:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    American Institute of Physics Bulletin of Physics News [PDF] ^ | January 11, 1996 | Phillip F. Schewe and Ben Stein
    Massive collapsing stars radiate most of their binding energy (about 10^53 ergs) in the form of neutrinos. The rate of such collapses in our galaxy is expected to be greater, perhaps by a large factor, than the supernova rate. John Bahcall estimates a rate of about one collapse every 11 years in our galaxy. Stellar collapses might not exhibit the conspicuous optical show of full-blown supernovas but can still be potent emitters of neutrinos. According to Juan Collar, recently of the University of South Carolina but now with the University of Paris, stellar-collapse neutrinos may have played a role in...
  • Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experiment

    03/11/2016 7:08:42 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 10, 2016
    [I posted this under science and food. Why? Because it's a story about genetically engineering a chicken so it's legs will grow like a dinosaurs, from which it evolved. But think about it. Instead of drumsticks you can eat dino-legs! And what will they taste like? Chicken, of course! Yummy!Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experimentAny one that has eaten roasted chicken can account for the presence in the drumstick (lower leg) of a long, spine-like bone. This is actually the fibula, one of the two long bones of the lower leg (the outer one). In dinosaurs, which...
  • Did Humans Kill Huge Animals in Snowmass 50,000 Years Ago?

    02/19/2016 1:40:44 AM PST · by SteveH · 31 replies
    Aspen Journalism ^ | July 3, 2013 | Allan Best
    Do earthquakes explain all those mastodon bones at Snowmass? Not likely, say scientists, although they haven’t completely shelved the idea. And did humans kill a mammoth 50,000 years ago and then cache the meat for later use? Circumstantial evidence of rocks intermixed with bones suggests that was the case. If so, it would rank as one of the major scientific discoveries of the decade, putting people on the North American continent some 36,000 years earlier than what is now generally agreed upon by archaeologists. That intriguing idea also remains on the shelf, just beyond touch for lack of corroborating evidence.
  • 1.1-Million-Year-Old Stegodon Tusk Unearthed in Pakistan

    02/16/2016 10:19:58 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    Discovery ^ | FEB 16, 2016
    A team of Pakistani researchers claims to have unearthed a 1.1 million-year-old stegodon tusk in the central province of Punjab, potentially shedding new light on the mammal's evolutionary journey. They've finally found a fossilized mosquito full of prehistoric blood! So a real "Jurassic Park" is right around the corner, right? Stegodonts, distant cousins of modern elephants, are thought to have been present on earth from around 11 million years ago until the late Pleistocene period, which lasted until the end of the last Ice Age around 11,700 years ago. The tusk measures some eight feet (2.44 metres) in length and...
  • New dinosaur species may have been found (Should say Marine Reptile)

    01/25/2016 8:18:55 AM PST · by C19fan · 18 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | January 23, 2015 | Nicola Harley
    Paleontologists believe they may have discovered a new species of dinosaur after digging up the remains of a 165 million year old sea creature. The five-and-a-half metre plesiosaur skeleton was found in a quarry in Peterborough and experts believe it could be a new species of the flippered marine reptile.
  • A Mysterious Mammoth Carcass Could Change Human History

    01/14/2016 8:42:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 108 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 01/14/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The carcass was remarkably well preserved, but something was clearly wrong. A rounded hole through the interior jugal. Deep incisions along the ribs. Dents in the left scapula. A broken mandible. This 45,000 year-old mammoth's life ended violently at the hands of hunters. That wouldn't be surprising-it's well known that Pleistocene humans were expert mammoth killers=but for the location. It was excavated from a permafrost embankment at Yenisei bay, a remote spot in central Siberia where a massive river empties into the Arctic Ocean. That makes this brutalized mammoth the oldest evidence for human expansion into the high Arctic by...
  • Fossil of massive crocodile found on edge of Sahara desert

    01/11/2016 6:15:44 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 51 replies
    Fox News ^ | 1-11-2016 | Michael Casey
    Paleontologists have discovered the fossil remains of the world’s biggest ocean-dwelling crocodile buried on the edge of the Sahara, a creature that was twice the size of anything seen today. Named Machimosaurus rex, this croc would have weighed in at least 6,600 pounds and been around 32 feet long. Other than its size, it would have looked much like a modern day crocodile except for its narrow snout – which was designed to allow it swim in the ocean.
  • Montana Officials Want Dollar Value On Dinosaur Fossils

    01/04/2016 9:45:28 PM PST · by This_far · 19 replies
    AP / Montana Standard ^ | January 03, 2016 9:30 pm | AP
    BOZEMAN (AP) - Montana State University is trying to put a value on dinosaur bones after state auditors said they need it for insurance policies, despite opposition from Museum of the Rockies' dinosaur experts who say it's unethical and dangerous to treat scientific research like it is marketable.
  • 'Pre-historic' animal shell found in Argentina

    12/31/2015 2:21:14 PM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 29, 2015 | Staff
    A glyptodont shell found in Carlos Spegazzini, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina on December 29, 2015 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A passer-by on Christmas Day found a meter-long shell on a riverbank in Argentina which may be from a glyptodont, a prehistoric kind of giant armadillo, experts said Tuesday. A local man thought the black scaly shell was a dinosaur egg when he saw it lying in the mud, his wife Reina Coronel told AFP. Her husband Jose Antonio Nievas found the shell beside a stream at their farm in Carlos Spegazzini, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the capital Buenos Aires. "My...
  • Unusual 'sail-backed' dinosaur roamed Spain 125 million years ago

    12/16/2015 7:34:46 PM PST · by EveningStar · 37 replies
    Reuters ^ | December 16, 2015 | Will Dunham
    Along a lush river delta in what is now northeastern Spain, a herd of dinosaurs munched on ferns and conifers similar to modern-day cypresses 125 million years ago. These creatures stood out from the others in this Cretaceous Period landscape by virtue of the unusual sail-like structure on their backs, and experts today can only hypothesize about its function.
  • Rapid short-term cooling following the Chicxulub impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

    05/19/2014 4:31:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    PNAS.org ^ | approved April 11, 2014 | Johan Vellekoop et al
    Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), we are able to demonstrate unambiguously that the impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (K–Pg, ∼66 Mya) was followed by a so-called “impact winter.” This impact winter was the result of the injection of large amounts of dust and aerosols into the stratosphere and significantly reduced incoming solar radiation for decades. Therefore, this phase will have been a key contributory element in the extinctions of many biological clades, including the dinosaurs. The K–Pg boundary impact presents a unique event in Earth history because it caused global change at an unparalleled rate. This detailed...
  • Dinosaur Puke Fossil Mystery Deepens

    11/16/2015 10:04:55 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    .discovery.com ^ | Alyssa Danigelis
    When researchers came across a unique fossil in Northern Italy in 1989, they concluded it was dinosaur vomit roughly 220 million years old. The fossil lacked the mineralization that would have put it in the dinosaur poop category — that’s “coprolite” if you want to be technical. They also identified the bones captured for eternity inside the puke as a tiny winged pterosaur. These reptilian dinosaur cousins evolved into dozens of species, and were the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight, according to the American Museum of Natural History. Vomit like this, usually from a predator regurgitating indigestible...
  • Leading Harvard physicist has a radical new theory for why humans exist

    11/15/2015 7:47:38 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 63 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/15/2015 | Jessica Orwig
    Where do we come from? There are many right answers to this question, and the one you get depends on who you ask. For example, an astrophysicist might say that the chemical components of our bodies were first forged in the nuclear fires of stars. On the other hand, an evolutionary biologist might look at the similarities between our DNA and that of other primates' and conclude we evolved from apes. Lisa Randall, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, has a different, and novel answer, which she describes in her latest book, "Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs." Randall has written...
  • Fire frogs' and eel-like amphibians: The Field Museum's Brazilian fossil discovery

    11/08/2015 1:14:06 PM PST · by JimSEA · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/05/2016 | Field Museum
    Two hundred and seventy-eight million years ago, the world was a different place. Not only were the landmasses merged into the supercontinent of Pangaea, but the land was home to ancient animals unlike anything alive today. But until now, very little information was available about what animals were present in the southern tropics. In a study published in Nature Communications, scientists from The Field Museum and colleagues from around the world describe several new amphibian species and a reptile from northeastern Brazil that help fill this key geographic gap and reveal how animals moved among regions in the supercontinent. "Almost...
  • Newly discovered dinosaur flaunts its feathers

    11/04/2015 12:41:20 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 35 replies
    Fox News ^ | November 04, 2015 | Michael Casey
    The remains of an ostrich-like creature with preserved feathers and soft tissue is shedding light on how dinosaurs used their plumage and further strengthens the linkages between these ancient beasts and modern birds. A paleontology student at the University of Alberta discovered the 75 million-year-old skeleton of an Ornithomimus dinosaur in the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta - one of only three feathered specimens found in the world. And while the feathers on the specimen were crushed, the researchers were surprised to see how similar they were to modern ostriches or emus.
  • The fiery world before dinosaurs: New research reveals fires were more common

    10/27/2015 12:40:54 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 32 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/26/205 | University of Royal Holloway London
    Scientists from the Department of Earth Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London together with colleagues from the USA, Russia and China, have discovered that forest fires across the globe were more common between 300 and 250 million years ago than they are today. This is thought to be due to higher level of oxygen in the atmosphere at that time. The study which was published in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science, found that peats that were to become coal contained high levels of charcoal that could only be explained by the high levels of fire activity. The team...
  • 10,000-Year-Old Extinct Lion Cubs Discovered In Near-Perfect Condition In Siberian Permafrost

    10/27/2015 11:42:03 AM PDT · by zeestephen · 21 replies
    MSN.com ^ | 27 October 2015 | Jeva Lange
    Cave lions lived during the Middle to Late Pleistocene eras in Eurasia, the British Isles, to the far east of Russia, and into Alaska and northwestern Canada. Their extinction remains something of a mystery because they had few predators and, due to their smaller size, they wouldn't get trapped in bogs like woolly mammoths and rhinos.
  • Now that really IS a mutant turtle: Archaeologists find bizarre pig snouted created once roamed Utah

    10/22/2015 5:15:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | October 21, 2015 | Mark Prigg
    The extinct turtle was about 2 feet long from head to tail. Its streamlined shell was adapted for living in a riverine environment. When it was alive, 76 million years ago during the Cretaceous Period, Southern Utah looked more like present-day Louisiana. The climate was wet and hot, and the landscape was dominated by rivers, bayous and lowland flood plains. It lived alongside tyrannosaurs, armored ankylosaurs, giant duck-billed dinosaurs such as Gryposaurus and Parasaurolophus, and other dinosaurs that left abundant fossil remains in the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Southern Utah. But those fossil beds also hold the remains of...
  • Legend of monster of Laguna Lake comes to life

    09/10/2004 8:21:32 AM PDT · by SoCal Pubbie · 32 replies · 9,096+ views
    Orange County Register ^ | 9/10/04 | BARBARA GIASONE
    FULLERTON – Rumors swirled around Laguna Lake for 40 years that a vicious snapping turtle named "Old Bob" lurked beneath its water lilies. Turns out the talk was not some exaggerated fish tale. On Thursday, dredging company workers snared the 100-pound snapper near a park dam in the north-central part of the city. A Santa Monica contractor, hired to scoop out fish during a $2 million restoration of the 7-acre lake, netted the 50-year-old, 36-inch alligator snapping turtle along with catfish, crappie and bluegills.
  • Pigs ruled the world 260 million years ago: Study

    09/17/2008 1:54:57 PM PDT · by decimon · 70 replies · 2,573+ views
    Newspost Online ^ | Sep 17, 2008 | Unknown
    Scientists from Leeds University have discovered that the world was ruled by pig-like creatures for a million years. The “Age of the Porcine” occurred around 260 million years ago - when the creatures called lystrosaurs were the few survivors of a mass extinction. Nearly 95 pct of the living species were destroyed by a series of volcanic eruptions leaving behind pigs in a “golden age” of no predators. They had Earth’s abundant plant-life all to themselves. “We can only speculate on how lystrosaurs survived while the rest died. Perhaps its ability to burrow and hibernate protected it from the worst...
  • 125-million-year-old mammal fossil reveals the early evolution of hair and spines

    10/20/2015 10:47:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 14, 2015 | Provided by: University of Chicago Medical Center
    Skeleton of the Cretaceous mammal Spinolestes with preserved fur shadows. The outer ear can be seen at the upper edge of the photo (arrow). During preparation, the skeleton was transferred to a plastic matrix. Credit: Georg Oleschinski. With permission of Nature Publishing Group ====================================================================================================================== The discovery of a new 125-million-year-old fossil mammal in Spain has pushed back the earliest record of preserved mammalian hair structures and inner organs by more than 60 million years. The specimen, named Spinolestes xenarthrosus, was fossilized with remarkably intact guard hairs, underfur, tiny hedgehog-like spines and even evidence of a fungal hair infection. The unusually...
  • Discovery Of 47 Teeth In Chinese Cave Changes Picture Of Human Migration Out Of Africa

    10/17/2015 9:09:33 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 33 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 15 October 2015 | Amina Khan
    Forty-seven smooth teeth dug out of a cave in southern China reveal that Homo sapiens may have arrived there 80,000 years ago...The findings, published this week in the journal Nature, may compel researchers to reconsider their theories about human migrations out of Africa.
  • Post-apocalyptic 'beaver' thrived after dinosaurs died

    10/05/2015 2:36:03 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    https://ca.news.yahoo.com ^ | 10-05-2015 | By By Will Dunham
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world had been wrecked. An asteroid impact in Mexico compounded by colossal volcanism in India 66 million years ago had killed about three-quarters of Earth's species including the dinosaurs. But relatively soon afterward, a plucky critter that looked like a beaver was thriving, exemplifying the resilience of the mammals that would arise from the margins of the animal kingdom to become Earth's dominant land creatures. Scientists on Monday announced the discovery in northwestern New Mexico's badlands of the fossil remains of Kimbetopsalis simmonsae, a plant-eating, rodent-like mammal boasting buck-toothed incisors like a beaver that lived just...
  • Giant prehistoric lizards co-existed with humans

    10/03/2015 7:44:05 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | October 01, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    While the concept of men battling 16–foot prehistoric lizards sounds like something out of a 50’s sci-fi flick, a new discovery in Australia has revealed that such encounters may have occurred. According to a study appearing in Quaternary Science Reviews, researchers from the University of Queensland have found a tiny fossil that belonged to a giant lizard bone 50,000 years ago, indicating that gigantic reptiles and humans once co–existed.
  • Why are there whale fossils in California mountains?

    09/22/2015 11:17:09 AM PDT · by george76 · 168 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor. ^ | September 21, 2015 | Story Hinckley,
    Construction workers in California's Santa Cruz mountains were subject to a surprise delay last week when a team of archaeologists took over the site to remove an ancient whale fossil. The project site was expected to have a high potential for archaeological finds, so a monitor was assigned to the Scotts Valley development and found the fossil amid construction vehicles on Sept. 4. This project site is not the only one in California with fossils ... Since the 19th century, paleontologists have been studying the “Sharktooth Hill Bone Bed” near Bakersfield, California, where fossils and bones of ancient whales, seals,...
  • Scientists dispute ‘new’ species discovery: Critics say Lead Researcher's claim jumps the gun

    09/18/2015 6:52:32 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    WORLD ^ | 09/11/2015 | DANIEL JAMES DEVINE
    Deep inside a cave 30 miles from Johannesburg, South Africa, a tight crevasse guards the passageway to what was, until recently, the grave of at least 15 human-like individuals. Their bones and teeth—more than 1,500 fragments in all—lay in a heap in the bottom of a pitch-black chamber for ages, until two skinny spelunkers with flashlights squeezed into the earth deep enough to find them. Now those bones are in the hands of scientists who say they belong to a new species of prehumans, with a mix of features typically associated with modern man or fossils belonging to Australopithecina, a...
  • Mammoth bones found, reburied

    12/08/2006 8:15:53 PM PST · by Dysart · 17 replies · 535+ views
    Star-Telgram ^ | 12-8-06 | BILL TEETER
    GRAPEVINE — These bones won’t talk — at least not until they’re unearthed again.Still smarting over the theft of dinosaur footprints this spring, the Army Corps of Engineers and the city of Grapevine have reburied parts of a Columbian mammoth that were found along the receding shore line.Visitors came across a jawbone and part of a tusk, and there may be more bones in the area, but there are no plans to study the location that is somewhere on 1,200 acres of Corps property under lease to the city, said Dale King, a conservation specialist with the corps. The find...
  • Bones Of Contention: Dinosaur Cells Survived Millions Of Years Trapped In Bone

    08/15/2015 8:58:12 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | Mary Schwietzer
    Twenty years ago Mary Schweitzer found herself the closest that anyone has ever been to a living dinosaur. As she examined a thin slice of a T. Rex bone fragment under a microscope, she realized she was looking at what appeared to be preserved red blood cells- cells which had no place in a 65 million year old fossil. It was the first time that anyone had found evidence that biological material could survive the passage of millions of years and still retain its molecular structure, challenging one of the central beliefs of paleontologists. Proving that what she was seeing...