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Keyword: paleontology

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  • Indiana Legend Says Welsh Settlers Arrived in the 12th Century

    05/01/2018 12:23:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 67 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | September 3, 1989 | Jodi Perras
    On a rugged bluff overlooking the Ohio River, known locally as "Devil's Backbone," centuries of overgrowth obscures a secret of history... In 1799, early settlers found six skeletons clad in breastplates bearing a Welsh coat of arms. Indian legends told of "yellow-haired giants" who settled in Kentucky, southern Indiana, southern Ohio and Tennessee -- a region they called "the Dark and Forbidden Land." Archeologists debunk the legend. They say that evidence indicates that the natives of the region once conducted a vigorous trading network nearby and buried their dead on the bluff... Upstream about 14 miles from Louisville, Ky., the...
  • In Footprints on Scotland’s Isle of Skye, Signs of a Dinosaur Playground

    04/04/2018 8:15:38 PM PDT · by BBell · 20 replies
    https://www.nytimes.com/ ^ | 4/4/18 | NICHOLAS ST. FLEUR
    Gigantic dinosaurs frolicked and splashed some 170 million years ago in the lagoons of what is now Scotland. That’s what a team of paleontologists has determined after discovering dozens of jumbo-sized footprints belonging to long-necked sauropods on the Isle of Skye. Mixed with the herbivores’ tracks were a few clawed impressions left behind by two-legged meat-eaters known as theropods. The footprints present a snapshot of life during an important period in dinosaur history that has yielded relatively few fossil remains. In the mid-Jurassic, sauropods necks grew longer and the first birds were figuring out flight.Identifying two types of footprints in...
  • AZ Senate heeds 11-year-old’s request on dinosaur designation

    03/11/2018 4:51:17 AM PDT · by SandRat · 16 replies
    Sierra Vista Herald ^ | Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services
    PHOENIX — A 27-foot-tall dinosaur that lived about 100 million years ago could soon have something in common with the cactus wren, the palo verde and even the Colt single action revolver: becoming part of "official'' Arizona. Members of the House Government Committee on Thursday gave their unanimous endorsement to the pleas of 11-year-old Jax Weldon to designate the Sonorasaurus as the "official state dinosaur.'' That sends SB 1517, which already has been approved by the Senate, to the full House. Weldon, a self-proclaimed amateur paleontologist, told lawmakers he was inspired after California lawmakers voted last year to select the...
  • Rare dinosaur discovery in EGYPT could signal more finds

    02/06/2018 9:05:27 AM PST · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    AP ^ | 02/06/2018 | Staff
    MANSOURA, Egypt (AP) — A skeleton has been unearthed in Egypt’s Western Desert, whose ancient sands have long helped preserve remains, but unlike most finds this one isn’t a mummy — it’s a dinosaur. Researchers from Mansoura University in the country’s Nile Delta discovered the new species of long-necked herbivore, which is around the size of a city bus, and it could be just the tip of the sand dune for other desert dinosaur discoveries. “As in any ecosystem, if we went to the jungle we’ll find a lion and a giraffe. So we found the giraffe, where’s the lion?”...
  • Scientists discover 'the Holy Grail of dinosaurs' in Africa

    01/30/2018 7:25:25 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 38 replies
    The Washington Compost ^ | January 30 at 3:32 PM | Amy B Wang
    Paleontologist Matthew Lamanna can still remember the day in 2014 when a colleague, Hesham Sallam, emailed him detailed pictures of fossils that had just been unearthed by his team in Egypt. From one photo, depicting the remains of a large lower jaw bone, Lamanna knew right away that Sallam had found a dinosaur. “No pun intended, my jaw did almost literally hit the floor when I saw that,” Lamanna, the principal dinosaur researcher at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, told The Washington Post. “When you stare at dinosaur bones for a lot of your life, you learn to recognize...
  • Giant killer lizard fossil shines new light on early Australians

    09/23/2015 12:42:47 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 11 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 9/23/2015 | Gilbert J. Price, et al
    As if life wasn't hard enough during the last Ice Age, a new study has found Australia's first human inhabitants had to contend with giant killer lizards. Researchers working in Central Queensland were amazed when they unearthed the first evidence that Australia's early human inhabitants and giant apex predator lizards had overlapped
  • Extinct 3-horned palaeomerycid ruminant found in Spain (Fossil)

    12/07/2015 10:56:30 AM PST · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/02/2015 | PLOS
    The extinct three-horned palaeomerycid ruminant, Xenokeryx amidalae, found in Spain, may be from the same clade as giraffes, according to a study published December 2, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Israel M. Sánchez from the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-CSIC, Madrid, Spain, and colleagues. Palaeomerycids, now extinct, were strange three-horned Eurasian Miocene ruminants known through fossils from Spain to China. In this article, the authors classify the palaeomerycid to their clade based on shared characteristics with the best-known species of the group and reassess their phylogenetic position among ruminants, which is currently disputed. The authors use well-preserved...
  • Dinosaur fossil found at Denver construction site

    09/11/2017 10:16:17 AM PDT · by ETL · 31 replies
    FoxNews/Science ^ | August 30, 2017
    Construction crews in Colorado made an unusual find at their construction site — a rare dinosaur fossil. The crews said they found the fossil while breaking ground on a new public safety facility in the city of Thornton, Fox 31 Denver reported.The fossil has been identified as a triceratops skull by scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, who went to the site and confirmed the dinosaur remnant."My heart was racing. I realized it was a pretty important dinosaur find," Joe Sertich, curator of dinosaurs for the museum, told Fox 31. "This is probably one of only three skulls...
  • Footprints of giant bugs rock old theories

    06/04/2002 9:05:57 AM PDT · by dead · 11 replies · 251+ views
    The New York Times via SMH ^ | June 5 2002 | William Broad
    Scientists investigating an abandoned quarry in Canada have found what appear to be the oldest known footprints of terrestrial creatures - bug-like creatures 30 centimetres long that crawled from the sea and left tracks in sandy dunes. The sandstone is between 480 and 500 million years old. Scientists believe the discovery region, just north of Lake Ontario outside Kingston, Ontario, was a sandy beach on a primordial sea. Scientists say the find pushes back the colonisation of land by about 40 million years and puts it in or near the late Cambrian period, when the seas were starting to boil...
  • Dino-Era Vomit Fossil Found in England

    05/03/2002 4:43:22 PM PDT · by vannrox · 30 replies · 640+ views
    National Geographic ^ | February 12, 2002 | Editorial Staff
    Dino-Era Vomit Fossil Found in England National Geographic News February 12, 2002 British scientists have discovered the world's oldest fossilized vomit, believed to have come from a large marine reptile 160 million years ago. The vomit contains the remains of dozens of belemnites—squid-like shellfish that lived in abundance in the seas around what is now Britain. The belemnites were eaten in great numbers by ichthyosaurs, large marine reptiles (related to land-dwelling dinosaurs) common in the warm seas of the Jurassic era, similar in size and shape to dolphins but with pointed snouts full of sharp teeth. The vomit fossil shows...
  • Tufty hair, orange eyebrows, freckles and no roar: What tyrannosaurus rex was REALLY like

    12/28/2017 2:11:36 PM PST · by mairdie · 61 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 28 December 2017 | Susie Coen
    With a roar loud enough to shake a forest and a green, scaly skin, it has long been regarded as the slickest villain of the prehistoric world. But according to a new TV programme, Tyrannosaurus Rex looked entirely different to the terrifying image so familiar from depictions on the silver screen. According to a new documentary, Tyrannosaurus Rex may not have been as terrifying as its depictions on the silver screen According to a new documentary, Tyrannosaurus Rex may not have been as terrifying as its depictions on the silver screen The dinosaur had black, bristly tufts of feathers and...
  • New dinosaur sported a curious set of chompers

    10/29/2017 8:55:21 PM PDT · by ETL · 19 replies
    ScienceNews.com ^ | October 26, 2017 | Helen Thompson
    Fossils discovered in France linked to previously unknown Cretaceous species. An ancient vegetarian dinosaur from the French countryside has given paleontologists something to sink their teeth into. The most striking feature of a new species of rhabdodontid that lived from 84 million to 72 million years ago is its oversized, scissorslike teeth, paleontologist Pascal Godefroit, of the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, and his colleagues report October 26 in Scientific Reports. Compared with other dinos of its kind, Matheronodon provincialis’ teeth were at least twice as large but fewer in number. Some teeth reached up to 6...
  • Extremely rare 13 million-year-old primate skull found

    08/09/2017 1:54:20 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    www.cnbc.com ^ | 08-09-2017 | Robert Ferris | @RobertoFerris
    * This may be the most intact primate fossil skull ever discovered. * The fossil comes from a little-known period of primate evolutionary history. Source: Fred Spoor This is Alesi, the skull of the new extinct ape species Nyanzapithecus alesi (KNM-NP 59050). ================================================================================================================================ A group of scientists have found what may be the most intact fossilized primate skull ever discovered, and the find could shed light on the common evolutionary heritage shared by apes and humans. The lemon-sized skull was discovered in Kenya by an international team of researchers, and was dated to the middle of the Miocene era, a...
  • Ancient Giant ‘Ghost’ Crocodile With T-Rex-Sized Teeth Discovered in Madagascar

    07/05/2017 9:18:48 AM PDT · by C19fan · 9 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 4, 2017 | Hannah Osborne
    Scientists have discovered an ancient, giant, crocodile-like creature in Madagascar that had T-Rex-sized teeth it used for crunching bones,. The discovery helps to fill in the evolutionary gaps of a 74 million year long crocodilian “ghost lineage.” Researchers first discovered fossils of a giant predator on the island over a decade ago. At the time, scientists believed they had discovered a large predator from the Jurassic period and they named the creature Razanandrongobe sakalavae, meaning “giant lizard ancestor from Sakalava region.”
  • The death of the dinosaurs was good news for frogs

    07/05/2017 6:32:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Cosmos ^ | July 4, 2017 | Tim wallace
    The asteroid that crashed into the planet about 66 million years might have been the end of the line for much of life on Earth, but for a few frogs it allowed a great leap forward. Genetic analysis by an international team of researchers from the US and China indicates that 88% of existing frog species are descended from just three frog families that survived and prospered following the mass extinction event known as the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary, which wiped out an estimated three-quarters of animals including non-avian dinosaurs and most large mammals.
  • Dec 2016: Feathered dinosaur tail fragment trapped in amber amazes scientists

    04/15/2017 2:35:43 PM PDT · by ETL · 101 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | December 09, 2016 | Rob Verger
    It’s a discovery that's straight out of “Jurassic Park.” Scientists have found a tiny section of a dinosaur’s tail trapped in amber, and not only that, it has feathers. Dating to about 99 million years ago, or the mid-Cretaceous period, the amber containing the eight dinosaur vertebrae originally came from Myanmar. While scientists have known since 1996 that some non-avian dinosaurs had feathers, and even suspected that fact 10 years before that, this new find can teach them more about how feathers have evolved over millions of years. The feathered tail in question came from a juvenile dinosaur, likely a...
  • Five million-year-old extinct 'super salmon' was 9 FEET long with a mouth full of spiked teeth

    10/31/2016 7:15:54 AM PDT · by C19fan · 24 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 31, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    A giant extinct salmon used a mouthful of spiked teeth to fight rivals more than five million years ago. The coastal waters of the Pacific were home to the bizarre species with huge teeth, a new study shows. The spike-toothed salmon reached sizes of three to nine feet in length (0.91 to 2.7m) - much larger than the typical salmon found in the Pacific today.
  • Ancient armored fish revises early history of jaws

    10/22/2016 3:56:17 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 20 replies
    Science News ^ | 10/20/16 | Meghan Rosen
    A freaky fish with a head like a dolphin and a body like a tank may be to thank for human jaws. The discovery of a 423-million-year-old armored fish from China suggests that the jaws of all modern land vertebrates and bony fish originated in a bizarre group of animals called placoderms, researchers report in the Oct. 21 Science. “We’ve suddenly realized we had it all wrong,” he says. The jaws of humans — and dogs, salmon, lizards and all other bony vertebrates — contain three key bones: the maxilla and premaxilla of the upper jaw, and the dentary of...
  • Forget what you thought dinosaurs looked like — this adorable bird–lizard just changed the game

    09/16/2016 11:45:38 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 9/15/2016 | L. Dodgson
    Paleontologists have teamed up with a paleoartist to create a model which challenges everything you thought you knew about the typical dinosaur. Dr. Jacob Vinther ofa Psittacosaurus — nicknamed a "parrot-lizard" — is about the size of a turkey, has bristles on its tail and a birdlike beak. In other words, a bit weird, but also pretty cute. It's also quite likely that the animal had feathers and a horn on each cheek, the experts say. Quite aptly, Psittacosaurus belongs to the group ceratopsians, which basically means "horned faces" in Greek. It's the same group that contains Triceratops. The scientists...
  • Illustrating Geology: Great images that transformed the field

    07/31/2016 7:47:42 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 2 replies
    Earth ^ | 7/17/2016 | Timothy Oleson
    Last year marked the 200th anniversary of the publication of what many consider the greatest geologic image ever produced: William Smith’s epic map, entitled “A Delineation of the Strata of England and Wales with Part of Scotland.” In striking color, scale and detail, the 1815 map laid bare the region’s bedrock — from tilted layers of slate and fossil-rich marls and sandstones to Carboniferous coal seams and granite plugs — as none had before. The bicentennial of the map’s publication was commemorated in several sessions and displays at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America (GSA) in Baltimore...