Keyword: passengerpigeon

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  • Mapping tree density at a global scale

    09/03/2015 10:33:23 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 10 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 9-2-2015
    The global extent and distribution of forest trees is central to our understanding of the terrestrial biosphere. We provide the first spatially continuous map of forest tree density at a global scale. This map reveals that the global number of trees is approximately 3.04 trillion, an order of magnitude higher than the previous estimate. Of these trees, approximately 1.39 trillion exist in tropical and subtropical forests, with 0.74 trillion in boreal regions and 0.61 trillion in temperate regions. Biome-level trends in tree density demonstrate the importance of climate and topography in controlling local tree densities at finer scales, as well...
  • Scientists undercount trees by 2.6 trillion, but assure us animals going extinct

    09/03/2015 6:50:18 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 24 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 09/03/2015 | NewsMachete
    Every so often you will see articles warning that some species is going extinct. And usually it's not really a species -- you never hear about "leopards" going extinct, usually it's "purple dotted left handed bisexual Nepalese leopards" or some subvariety.  We are assured they are going extinct because fewer have been seen recently. But the Earth is so big, how can we really be sure that some subspecies is going extinct just because we see fewer of them? After all, only three percent of the land mass of the Earth is urbanized. Animals could easily be hidden in...
  • 'Settled Science' chronicle: world has 7.5 times more trees than previously believed

    09/03/2015 6:09:42 AM PDT · by rktman · 16 replies
    americanthinker.com ^ | 9/3/2015 | Thomas Lifson
    It seems that scientists were a little off in calculating the number of trees on the planet. You remember trees: they turn CO2 into oxygen and water. In fact, if you buy a “carbon credit,” you are paying to plant trees to buy an indulgence for your private jet travel -- just like Al Gore and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. supposedly do. Well, all those calculations of doom over purported CO2-caused global warming may be a little more unsettled. The Wall Street Journal reports:
  • World Has Many More Trees Than Previously Thought, New Report Says

    09/02/2015 11:23:33 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    WSJ ^ | Mark Armao
    There are just over three trillion trees in the world, a figure that dwarfs previous estimates, according to the most comprehensive census yet of global forestation. Using satellite imagery as well as ground-based measurements from around the world, a team led by researchers at Yale University created the first globally comprehensive map of tree density. Their findings were published in the journal Nature on Wednesday. A previous study that drew on satellite imagery estimated that the total number of trees was around 400 billion. The new estimate of 3.04 trillion is multiple times that number, bringing the ratio of trees...
  • Three trillion trees: Study finds there are 7.5 times more trees than previously believed

    09/02/2015 10:56:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 115 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | September 2, 2015 | Provided by: Yale University
    The global map of tree density at the square-kilometer pixel scale. Credit: Crowther, et al A new Yale-led study estimates that there are more than 3 trillion trees on Earth, about seven and a half times more than some previous estimates. But the total number of trees has plummeted by roughly 46 percent since the start of human civilization, the study estimates. Using a combination of satellite imagery, forest inventories, and supercomputer technologies, the international team of researchers was able to map tree populations worldwide at the square-kilometer level. Their results, published in the journal Nature, provide the most comprehensive...
  • The Last Passenger Pigeon Went Extinct 100 Years Ago

    08/31/2014 8:50:42 PM PDT · by chessplayer · 64 replies
    Tomorrow marks exactly 100 years since the last passenger pigeon, a female named Martha, died in captivity at the Cincinnati Zoo. At their peak, millions — some argue billions — of passenger pigeons flew together, creating such a ruckus as to make normal conversation a challenge. Yet their numbers diminished rapidly, plunging perilously close to extinction within just a few decades thanks to our voracious appetite for the birds. Then they flamed out completely, the last wild one shot in 1900 and Martha dying 14 years later. “The bird was hunted out of existence,” wrote journalist Barry Yeoman in Audubon...
  • The Second Cooing: Raising Passenger Pigeons from the Dead

    04/12/2013 8:05:13 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 16 replies
    Der Spiegel ^ | April 12, 2013 – 11:13 AM | Philip Bethge
    The world has been without passenger pigeons since 1914. Now, scientists want to bring them back. Geneticist Ben Novak has embarked on the project and has begun collecting passenger pigeon DNA from natural history museums. His “de-extinction” efforts are not without critics. … Novak, a researcher with the Long Now Foundation, a California think tank, wants to give the species a second chance. At the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Berkeley, Novak used a scalpel to slice small tissue samples from the red-painted toes of the passenger pigeons kept there. He hopes to isolate tiny bits of DNA from the...
  • Reviving the Woolly Mammoth: Will De-Extinction Become Reality?

    03/16/2013 2:32:30 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Yahoo News | Live Science ^ | 3/15/13 | Megan Gannon
    Biologists briefly brought the extinct Pyrenean ibex back to life in 2003 by creating a clone from a frozen tissue sample harvested before the goat's entire population vanished in 2000. The clone survived just seven minutes after birth, but it gave scientists hope that "de-extinction," once a pipedream, could become a reality. Ten years later, a group of researchers and conservationists gathered in Washington, D.C., today (March 15) for a forum called TEDxDeExtinction, hosted by the National Geographic Society, to talk about how to revive extinct animals, from the Tasmanian tiger and the saber-toothed tiger to the woolly mammoth and...
  • Marin Environmentalist Claims Recreating Extinct Species Is Possible [ No more endangered species! ]

    02/28/2013 7:32:53 PM PST · by NoLibZone · 22 replies
    cbslocal.com ^ | Feb 28 2013 | cbslocal.com
    LONG BEACH (CBS SF) – Speaking from the prestigious TED Conference in Long Beach Wednesday, Sausalito activist Stewart Brand said scientists are developing the ability to reassemble an extinct animal’s genome, and even recreate the animal itself. Brand, who gained fame after he campaigned to have the original NASA space photos of earth published, and subsequently created the Whole Earth Catalog, said Wednesday that “de-extinction” could be used to help restore organisms and habitats damaged human activity, according to a report in the Marin Independent Journal. A team of Harvard geneticists are currently working to bring back the passenger pigeon,...
  • DNA reveals identity of Passenger Pigeon

    10/31/2010 5:11:44 AM PDT · by Palter · 48 replies · 1+ views
    Birdwatch ^ | 30 Oct 2010 | Birdwatch
    The extinct Passenger Pigeon, once the most numerous bird species in the world, has had its closest living relatives identified by DNA extracted from museum specimens.The Passenger Pigeon was a forest nomad, breeding in vast colonies and following sporadic crops of acorns and chestnuts around the dense deciduous forests of the eastern and central United States. the forests were once so vast that they could support tens of millions of the birds, which were known to form flocks so huge that they darkened the sky when dispersing. This made them easy prey for hunters' guns, and the greed and over-exploitation...