Keyword: perseids

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  • Perseids Meteor Showers

    Many skywatchers love August because the ever-reliable Perseid meteor shower peaks mid-month, but unfortunately, this year's usually brilliant meteor display may be spoiled by a bright full moon. Link 1The Perseid shower is expected to reach its peak at 8 p.m. EDT on August 12. The bright moon will rise the around 9:30 p.m. eastern time on Aug. 12 and 13, and shine brightly the rest of the night. To make matters worse, the full moon rising Sunday (Aug. 10) will be brighter than it usually is because this full moon, called a "supermoon," will be the closest of 2014....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Perseid Below

    08/09/2014 10:33:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | August 10, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Denizens of planet Earth typically watch meteor showers by looking up. But this remarkable view, captured on August 13, 2011 by astronaut Ron Garan, caught a Perseid meteor by looking down. From Garan's perspective onboard the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of about 380 kilometers, the Perseid meteors streak below, swept up dust left from comet Swift-Tuttle heated to incandescence. The glowing comet dust grains are traveling at about 60 kilometers per second through the denser atmosphere around 100 kilometers above Earth's surface. In this case, the foreshortened meteor flash is right of frame center, below the...
  • Supermoon vs. Perseids: Will bright moon blot out meteor shower?

    08/09/2014 6:50:00 AM PDT · by Morgana · 7 replies
    CBS ^ | Joe Rao
    Many skywatchers love August because the ever-reliable Perseid meteor shower peaks mid-month, but unfortunately, this year's usually brilliant meteor display may be spoiled by a bright full moon. The Perseid shower is expected to reach its peak at 8 p.m. EDT on August 12. The bright moon will rise the around 9:30 p.m. eastern time on Aug. 12 and 13, and shine brightly the rest of the night. To make matters worse, the full moon rising Sunday (Aug. 10) will be brighter than it usually is because this full moon, called a "supermoon," will be the closest of 2014
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid Meteors Over China

    08/20/2013 9:20:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | August 21, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Comet dust rained down on planet Earth earlier this month, streaking through dark skies in the annual Perseid meteor shower. While enjoying the anticipated space weather above Zhangbei Prairie, Hebei Province, China, astronomer Xiang Zhan recorded a series of 10 second long exposures spanning four hours on the night of August 12/13 using a wide angle lens. Combining frames which captured 68 meteor flashes, he produced the above composite view of the Perseids of summer. Although the sand-sized comet particles are traveling parallel to each other, the resulting shower meteors clearly seem to radiate from a single point on...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid Meteors Over Ontario

    08/13/2013 3:32:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | August 13, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Where are all of these meteors coming from? In terms of direction on the sky, the pointed answer is the constellation of Perseus. That is why the meteor shower that peaked over the past few days is known as the Perseids -- the meteors all appear to come from a radiant toward Perseus. Three dimensionally, however, sand-sized debris expelled from Comet Swift-Tuttle follows a well-defined orbit about our Sun, and the part of the orbit that approaches Earth is superposed in front of the Perseus. Therefore, when Earth crosses this orbit, the radiant point of falling debris appears in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseids over Meteora

    08/10/2013 2:36:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | August 10, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The two bright meteors flashing through this night skyscape from August 7 are part of the ongoing Perseid meteor shower. In the direction indicated by both colorful streaks, the shower's radiant in the eponymous constellation Perseus is at the upper right. North star Polaris, near the center of all the short, arcing star trails is at the upper left. But also named for its pose against the sky, the monastery built on the daunting sandstone cliffs in the foreground is part of Meteora. A World Heritage site, Meteora is a historic complex of lofty monasteries located near Kalabaka in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid over Albrechtsberg Castle

    08/10/2013 2:35:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | August 09, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Medieval Albrechtsberg castle is nestled in trees near the northern bank of the river Pielach and the town of Melk, Austria. In clearing night skies on August 12, 2012 it stood under constellations of the northern summer, including Aquarius, Aquila, and faint, compact Delphinus (above and right of center) in this west-looking skyview. The scene also captures a bright meteor above the castle walls. Part of the annual perseid meteor shower, its trail points back toward the heroic constellation Perseus high above the horizon in the early morning hours. Entering the atmosphere at about 60 kilometers per second, perseid...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid over Albrechtsberg Castle

    08/24/2012 9:12:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | August 25, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Medieval Albrechtsberg castle is nestled in trees near the northern bank of the river Pielach and the town of Melk, Austria. In clearing night skies on August 12 it stood under constellations of the northern summer, including Aquarius, Aquila, and faint, compact Delphinus (above and right of center) in this west-looking skyview. The scene also captures a bright meteor above the castle walls. Part of the annual perseid meteor shower, its trail points back toward the heroic constellation Perseus high above the horizon in the early morning hours. Entering the atmosphere at about 60 kilometers per second, perseid meteors...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid Meteors and the Milky Way

    08/14/2012 2:29:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | August 14, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Where will the next Perseid meteor appear? Sky enthusiasts who trekked outside for the Perseid meteor shower that peaked over the past few days typically had this question on their mind. Six meteors from this past weekend are visible in the above stacked image composite, including one bright fireball streaking along the band of the background Milky Way Galaxy. All Perseid meteors appear to come from the shower radiant in the constellation of Perseus. Early reports about this year's Perseids indicate that as many as 100 meteors per hour were visible from some dark locations during the peak. The...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid Below

    08/10/2012 3:55:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | August 10, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Denizens of planet Earth watched last year's Perseid meteor shower by looking up into the bright moonlit night sky. But this remarkable view captured on August 13, 2011 by astronaut Ron Garan looks down on a Perseid meteor. From Garan's perspective onboard the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of about 380 kilometers, the Perseid meteors streak below, swept up dust left from comet Swift-Tuttle heated to incandescence. The glowing comet dust grains are traveling at about 60 kilometers per second through the denser atmosphere around 100 kilometers above Earth's surface. In this case, the foreshortened meteor flash...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Perseid Below

    08/17/2011 2:31:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    NASA ^ | August 17, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Denizens of planet Earth watched this year's Perseid meteor shower by looking up into the moonlit night sky. But this remarkable view captured by astronaut Ron Garan looks down on a Perseid meteor. From Garan's perspective onboard the International Space Station orbiting at an altitude of about 380 kilometers, the Perseid meteors streak below, swept up dust left from comet Swift-Tuttle heated to incandescence. The glowing comet dust grains are traveling at about 60 kilometers per second through the denser atmosphere around 100 kilometers above Earth's surface. In this case, the foreshortened meteor flash is right of frame center,...
  • "Spectacular" Double Meteor Shower This Week

    07/29/2011 8:18:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | July 25, 2011 | Andrew Fazekas
    Delta Aquarids, Perseids to create one of the best sky shows of the year... One of the best shooting star events of the year is the annual August Perseid meteor shower. (See Perseids pictures.) However this year's peak, on August 12, happens to coincide with a bright full moon—drastically cutting down the number of meteors visible to the naked eye. Yet while the main event might be blocked out by the blinding moonlight, the opening act promises to be much better. This year the lesser known Delta Aquarid meteor shower is expected to peak on Friday night, when the Delta...
  • Spectacular Meteor Shower and Rare Planet Alignment Coincide (tonite thru pre-dawn FRiday)

    08/12/2010 7:17:59 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies · 2+ views
    Space.com ^ | 8/13/10 | Robert Roy Britt
    Update Aug. 12, 4:15 p.m. ET: The International Meteor Organization reports that hourly rate for Perseid meteors has climbed from the low 20s Tuesday into the 30s on Wednesday and now into the 40s. This represents the number of meteors observable per under perfectly dark skies. While the typical person's actual observation will be lower, the rising rate — fully expected — indicates the peak tonight and Friday morning will indeed be worth viewing, as predicted. — RRB The annual Perseid meteor shower is already putting on an excellent show, and the celestial fireworks have yet to peak. The main...
  • Perseid meteor shower is here - Tonight best after midnight

    08/12/2010 12:32:59 AM PDT · by Fred · 1 replies
    Seattle PI blog ^ | 081210 | Amy Rolph
    Showers are expected Thursday, but not the wet kind that have plagued Seattle all summer. The Perseid meteor shower will be visible Thursday night, and viewing conditions should be optimal. The meteor shower appears every year as the Earth enters a band of dust that trails the comet Swift-Tuttle. It's one of of the more reliable night-sky events for stargazers in Seattle, and this year's show could be easier to watch because of clear skies and limited moonlight.
  • 'Spectacular' Meteor Shower to Pass Earth This Week

    08/11/2009 6:05:16 PM PDT · by RDTF · 25 replies · 2,815+ views
    Fox ^ | Aug 11, 2009
    The annual Perseid meteor shower is expected to put on a good show this week for those willing to get up in the wee hours of the morning and wait patiently for the shooting stars. In North America, the best time to watch will be between midnight to 5 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 12, but late Tuesday night and also Wednesday night could prove fruitful, weather permitting. The Perseids are always reliable, and sometimes rather spectacular. The only things that puts a damper on the August show are bad weather or bright moonlight. Unfortunately this week, as the Perseids reach...
  • Skywatchers set for Meteor Shower (August 12th)

    08/10/2009 9:40:07 PM PDT · by TaraP · 9 replies · 1,373+ views
    BBC ^ | August 10th, 2009
    <p>Skygazers are getting ready to watch the annual Perseid meteor shower, which peaks on Wednesday.</p> <p>The Perseid shower occurs when the Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.</p> <p>As this cometary "grit" strikes our atmosphere, it burns up, often creating streaks of light across the sky.</p>
  • 'Great Show': Perseid Meteor Shower Peaks Sunday Night

    08/12/2007 7:59:47 PM PDT · by hc87 · 28 replies · 1,553+ views
    Space.com ^ | 8/10/2007 | Joe Rao
    Every August, just when many people go vacationing in the country where skies are dark, the best-known meteor shower makes its appearance. The annual Perseid meteor shower is expected to be at its best this year, producing one or two meteors per minute during peak hours. "It's going to be a great show," said Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama.
  • Prepare for the Perseids (Are you Ready for Some Meteors?!)

    08/08/2007 11:56:13 AM PDT · by Squidpup · 30 replies · 895+ views
    SkyandTelescope.com ^ | August 6, 2007 | Tony Flanders
    August is the best month overall to view meteors from the Northern Hemisphere, according to Robert Lunsford, operations manager of the American Meteor Society. And conditions are ideal this year because the Perseid meteor shower peaks on the new-Moon night of Sunday–Monday, August 12–13. The Perseids are one of the two strongest and most reliable annual meteor showers. (The other is December's Geminids.) And while some showers produce brief bursts lasting just a few hours, the Perseids have a broad peak. So don't despair if clouds are forecast for Sunday night — or if work obligations prevent you from staying...
  • Meteors on the Feast of St. Lawrence

    08/09/2006 8:43:48 PM PDT · by WillOTerry · 5 replies · 479+ views
    In August of A.D. 258, the emperor Valerian ordered that all deacons, priests, and Bishops be put to death. Tradition via the Golden Legend tells us that Pope Sixtus II met with Lawrence, saying to him: "I shall not leave thee, my son, but greater strifes and battles be due to thee for the faith of Jesu Christ. We, as old men, have taken more lighter battle, and to thee as to a young man shall remain a more glorious battle of which thou shalt triumph and have victory of the tyrant, and shalt follow me within three days...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 8/15/02

    08/14/2002 9:31:46 PM PDT · by sleavelessinseattle · 12 replies · 299+ views
    NASA ^ | 8/15/02 | Wade B. Clark. JR.
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 August 15 Meteors and Northern Lights Credit & Copyright: Wade B. Clark Jr. Explanation: Skygazers report that the annual Perseid meteor shower went pretty much as predicted, producing a meteor every few minutes during the dark early morning hours of August 12 and 13. And as the constellation Perseus rose above the horizon on the night of August 11, astrophotographer Wade Clark was anticipating recording images of...