Keyword: physics

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  • Scientists uncover mystery of ball lightning

    10/19/2012 9:18:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 37 replies
    ABC (AU) ^ | October 13, 2012 | Darren Osborne
    A team of Australian scientists believe they have uncovered the cause of one of nature's most bizarre phenomenon - ball lightning. Ball lightning is typically the size of a grapefruit and lasts up to 20 seconds. "Ball lightning has been reported by hundreds of people, for hundreds of years and it has been a mystery," said CSIRO scientist John Lowke, lead author of a new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres. Previous theories have suggested microwave radiation, oxidising aerosols, nuclear energy, dark matter, antimatter, and even black holes as possible causes. One recent theory suggests burning silicon...
  • Manipulators of the Quantum Realm Reap Nobel Glory

    10/09/2012 11:43:46 AM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 October 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Light touch. Serge Haroche and David Wineland (right) won the Nobel for their work manipulating the quantum states of individual atoms. Credit: CNRS and NIST The past couple of decades have witnessed a sea change in quantum physics. Previously, scientists relied on the strange rules of quantum theory mainly to explain the odd natural behavior of masses of atoms and other quantum particles such as photons. Increasingly, however, physicists are exploiting those rules to create delicate quantum states of individual particles and to do novel things with them. This year's Nobel Prize in physics honors two experimenters...
  • Awesome HD Slinky Slow-Mo…Does Gravity Really Work Like We Think It Does?

    10/04/2012 4:04:07 PM PDT · by jwsea55 · 83 replies
    Veritasium ^ | Sept 29, 2012 | Jim Caldwell
    Watching this video, I have to ask, do we really understand gravity? When we release an object from our hands, it falls. Right? Not always? Or at least, not right away? Veritasium has put some pretty cool videos to explain how science and physics work. They have been working with slinkies on a number of videos (and you thought your kid didn’t have any potential at 3 years old), this video seems to capture the essences of their work. So listening to a couple of science guys explain this, does this give one a solid enough understanding why that darn...
  • 'Tantalizing' hints of room-temperature superconductivity Doped graphite may superconduct at...

    09/19/2012 11:06:48 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 18 September 2012 | Edwin Cartlidge
    Doped graphite may superconduct at more than 100 şC. Researchers in Germany have claimed a breakthrough: a material that can act as a superconductor — transmit electricity with zero resistance — at room temperature and above. Superconductors offer huge potential energy savings, but until now have worked only at temperatures of lower than about -110 °C. Now, Pablo Esquinazi and his colleagues at the University of Leipzig report that flakes of humble graphite soaked in water seem to continue superconducting at temperatures of greater than 100 °C1. Even Esquinazi admits that the claim “sounds like science fiction”, but the work...
  • Atomic bond types discernible in single-molecule images

    09/14/2012 7:55:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13 September 2012 | Jason Palmer
    A pioneering team from IBM in Zurich has published single-molecule images so detailed that the type of atomic bonds between their atoms can be discerned. The same team took the first-ever single-molecule image in 2009 and more recently published images of a molecule shaped like the Olympic rings. The new work opens up the prospect of studying imperfections in the "wonder material" graphene or plotting where electrons go during chemical reactions. The images are published in Science. The team, which included French and Spanish collaborators, used a variant of a technique called atomic force microscopy, or AFM. AFM uses a...
  • Microwave weapons: Wasted energy

    09/14/2012 12:27:13 AM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 12 September 2012 | Sharon Weinberger
    Despite 50 years of research on high-power microwaves, the US military has yet to produce a usable weapon. For some Pentagon officials, the demonstration in October 2007 must have seemed like a dream come true — an opportunity to blast reporters with a beam of energy that causes searing pain. The event in Quantico, Virginia, was to be a rare public showing for the US Air Force's Active Denial System: a prototype non-lethal crowd-control weapon that emits a beam of microwaves at 95 gigahertz. Radiation at that frequency penetrates less than half a millimetre into the skin, so the beam...
  • IU mathematician offers unified theory of dark matter, dark energy, altering Einstein field...

    09/08/2012 1:36:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    Indiana University ^ | Sept. 6, 2012 | NA
    IU mathematician offers unified theory of dark matter, dark energy, altering Einstein field equations BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- A pair of mathematicians -- one from Indiana University and the other from Sichuan University in China -- have proposed a unified theory of dark matter and dark energy that alters Einstein's equations describing the fundamentals of gravity. Shouhong Wang, a professor in the IU College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Mathematics, and Tian Ma, a professor at Sichuan University, suggest the law of energy and momentum conservation in spacetime is valid only when normal matter, dark matter and dark energy are...
  • Best Majors for GRE Scores: Still Physics and Philosophy

    08/25/2012 9:26:40 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 6 replies
    Best Majors for GRE Scores: Still Physics and Philosophy Monday, August 20, 2012 Fall is just around the corner, and that means many college seniors will soon face an enemy more daunting than senioritis itself: the Graduate Record Examinations. Many schools require GRE test scores for admission to their graduate programs, and the tests are supposed to be one of the most objective measures of prospective students. GRE scores can make or break a graduate school application, so how should students prepare? Although there are a plethora of study books and materials available, decisions made freshman year may determine...
  • Researchers Invent New Tool to Study Single Biological Molecules

    08/05/2012 11:16:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Aug. 3, 2012 | NA
    By blending optical and atomic force microscope technologies, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have found a way to complete 3-D measurements of single biological molecules with unprecedented accuracy and precision. Existing technologies allow researchers to measure single molecules on the x and y axes of a 2-D plane. The new technology allows researchers to make height measurements (the z axis) down to the nanometer -- just a billionth of a meter -- without custom optics or special surfaces for the samples. "This is a completely new type of measurement that can be used to determine the z position...
  • Ford's Trade-In: Truck to Use Aluminum in Place of Steel

    07/27/2012 2:33:00 PM PDT · by Responsibility2nd · 139 replies
    WSJ ^ | 07/26/2012 | MIKE RAMSEY
    <p>ALLEN PARK, Mich.—In this suburb just west of Detroit, Ford Motor Co. is working on one of the biggest gambles in its 108-year history: a pickup truck with a largely aluminum body.</p> <p>The radical redesign will help meet tougher federal fuel-economy targets now starting to have wide-ranging effects on Detroit's auto makers. But Ford will have to overcome a host of manufacturing obstacles, plus convince die-hard pickup buyers that aluminum is as tough as steel.</p>
  • Mystery Tug on Spacecraft Is Einstein’s ‘I Told You So’

    07/24/2012 3:42:38 AM PDT · by neverdem · 49 replies
    NY Times ^ | July 23, 2012 | DENNIS OVERBYE
    It’s been a bad year to bet against Albert Einstein. In the spring physicists had to withdraw a sensational report that the subatomic particles known as neutrinos were going faster than light, Einstein’s cosmic speed limit; they discovered they had plugged in a cable wrong. Now scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have reported that they have explained one of the great mysteries of the space age, one that loomed for 30 years as a threat to the credibility of Einsteinian gravity. The story starts with the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes, which went past Jupiter and Saturn in...
  • At Long Last, Physicists Discover Famed Higgs Boson

    07/12/2012 12:46:07 PM PDT · by neverdem · 35 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 4 July 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Twin peaks. Both the CMS (top) and the ATLAS (bottom) detectors see evidence of the Higgs boson decaying into a pair of photons in the form of a peak in a so-called mass plot. The agreement of the two peaks and other data clinch the discovery of the Higgs. Credit: CMS and ATLAS collaborations MEYRIN, SWITZERLAND—The long wait is over. Today, physicists working with the world's largest atom smasher here at the European particle physics laboratory, CERN, reported that they have discovered the long-sought Higgs boson—the last missing bit in their standard model of fundamental particles and...
  • American Accelerator's Last Hurrah: 99.8% Certainty God Particle is Found

    07/05/2012 8:30:21 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 42 replies
    Daily Tech ^ | July 3, 2012 7:58 PM | Jason Mick (Blog)
    Tevatron presents strong evidence Higgs boson was observed, but LHC needed to provide final verificationTomorrow, while America celebrates July 4, mankind worldwide may celebrate a separate momentous event -- the discovery of the legendary Higgs boson. I. Riding Into the Sunset -- Tevatron Goes Out With a Bang The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will tomorrow hold a special press conference at 9 a.m.  The event will provide an update to the world on the progress in the search for the critical particle using the Large Hadron Collider, the largest and most expensive laboratory apparatus in history.  Many physicists...
  • God Particle is 'Found': Scientists at Cern Expected to Announce Higgs Boson Has Been Discovered

    07/03/2012 10:58:39 AM PDT · by lbryce · 13 replies
    Mail Online ^ | July 1, 2012 | Rob Cooper
    Full Title:God Particle is 'Found': Scientists at Cern Expected to Announce on Wednesday Higgs Boson Particle Has Been Discovered Scientists at Cern will announce that the elusive Higgs boson 'God Particle' has been found at a press conference next week, it is believed. Five leading theoretical physicists have been invited to the event on Wednesday - sparking speculation that the particle has been discovered. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider are expected to say they are 99.99 per cent certain it has been found - which is known as 'four sigma' level. Peter Higgs, the Edinburgh University emeritus professor of...
  • Inflating the Evidence

    06/27/2012 8:49:56 PM PDT · by lasereye · 18 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 2007 | David F. Coppedge
    In their quest to disprove design in the universe, scientists have produced evermore speculative models of cosmology. Big Bang cosmology, for example, relies heavily on a process called inflation, an ad hoc speculation that remains highly controversial 26 years after it was first proposed. By the 1980s, cosmologists were struck by the homogeneity and flatness of our universe. In other words, matter appears to be uniformly distributed on a large scale, and the average density of matter in the universe is balanced against its expansion rate to a high degree of precision. These and other properties appear too finely tuned...
  • Wires turn salt water into freshwater

    06/10/2012 10:10:32 PM PDT · by Kevmo · 46 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | June 8, 2012 | Lisa Zyga
    June 8, 2012 by Lisa Zyga (Phys.org) -- As a rising global population and increasing standard of living drive demand for freshwater, many researchers are developing new techniques to desalinate salt water. Among them is a team of scientists from The Netherlands, who have shown how to transform brackish (moderately salty) water into potable freshwater using just a pair of wires and a small voltage that can be generated by a small solar cell. The simple technique has the potential to be more energy-efficient than other techniques because of the minimal amount of mixing between the treated and untreated...
  • Tabletop X-rays light up

    06/09/2012 12:14:48 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    Nature News ^ | 08 June 2012 | Katherine Bourzac
    Compact device promises to open window on chemical reactions in the lab. The pressurized, cylindrical chamber fits in the palm of Margaret Murnane’s hand. Yet out of one end of the device comes an X-ray beam that packs almost as much punch as the light generated by massive particle accelerators. Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, both physicists at JILA in Boulder, Colorado, a joint institute of the University of Colorado and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology, have reported the first tabletop source of ultra-short, laser-like pulses of low energy, or ‘soft’, X-rays. The light, capable of probing the...
  • Giant black hole kicked out of home galaxy

    06/04/2012 11:22:44 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | June 04, 2012 | Provided by Chandra X-ray Center
    Astronomers have found strong evidence that a massive black hole is being ejected from its host galaxy at a speed of several million miles per hour. New observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory suggest that the black hole collided and merged with another black hole and received a powerful recoil kick from gravitational wave radiation. "It's hard to believe that a supermassive black hole weighing millions of times the mass of the sun could be moved at all, let alone kicked out of a galaxy at enormous speed," said Francesca Civano of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), who led...
  • Landmark calculation clears the way to answering how matter is formed

    05/28/2012 12:11:23 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 21 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 25, 2012 | Cindy Weiss
    May 25, 2012 By Cindy Weiss EnlargeThomas C. Blum, Associate Professor, Physics. Credit: Daniel Buttrey/UConn (Phys.org) -- An international collaboration of scientists, including Thomas Blum, associate professor of physics, is reporting in landmark detail the decay process of a subatomic particle called a kaon – information that may help answer fundamental questions about how the universe began. Ads by GoogleSix Sigma — Black Belt - Get Trained & Six Sigma Certified. Flexible, Top Program 100% online. - www.VillanovaU.com/SixSigmaThe research, reported online in the March 30, 2012 Physical Review Letters, used breakthrough techniques on some of the world’s fastest supercomputers to...
  • Symphony of science: The Quantum World

    05/27/2012 9:45:37 PM PDT · by Windflier · 46 replies
    YouTube ^ | September 2011 | John D Boswell
    A musical investigation into the nature of atoms and subatomic particles, the jiggly things that make up everything we see. Featuring Morgan Freeman, Stephen Hawking, Michio Kaku, Brian Cox, Richard Feynman, and Frank Close. "The Quantum World" is the eleventh installment in the ongoing Symphony of Science music video series. Track back to source website: Symphony of Science