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Keyword: physics

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  • Physicists Measure the Skin of a Nucleus

    03/03/2012 9:41:05 PM PST · by neverdem · 20 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 2 March 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Nuclear dermatology clinic. The vessel containing the lead sample in the PREX experiment (left) and the massive spectrometers used to detect the electrons scattered from the lead nuclei and measure the nuclei's skin. Credit: Photos Courtesy of Robert Michaels A large atomic nucleus is like a chocolate truffle with a gooey interior and a harder shell. Inside, the nucleus contains a mixture of protons and neutrons. Outside, it's covered with a nearly pure layer of neutrons—the "neutron skin." Now, for the first time, nuclear physicists have measured the thickness of that skin in a fairly direct way....
  • Official Word on Superluminal Neutrinos Leaves Warp-Drive Fans a Shred of Hope—Barely

    02/29/2012 4:45:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 13 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceInsider ^ | 24 February 2012 | Edwin Cartlidge
    The CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva has confirmed Wednesday's report that a loose fiber-optic cable may be behind measurements that seemed to show neutrinos outpacing the speed of light. But the lab also says another glitch could have caused the experiment to underestimate the particles' speed. In a statement based on an earlier press release from the OPERA collaboration, CERN said two possible "effects" may have influenced the anomalous measurements. One of them, due to a possible faulty connection between the fiber-optic cable bringing the GPS signals to OPERA and the detector's master clock, would have caused the experiment...
  • What Would Happen If You Shot a Gun In Space?

    02/25/2012 3:43:56 PM PST · by U-238 · 142 replies · 1+ views
    Life Little Mysteries ^ | 2/17/2010 | Natalie Wolchover
    Fires can't burn in the oxygen-free vacuum of space, but guns can shoot. Modern ammunition contains its own oxidizer, a chemical that will trigger the explosion of gunpowder, and thus the firing of a bullet, wherever you are in the universe. No atmospheric oxygen required. The only difference between pulling the trigger on Earth and in space is the shape of the resulting smoke trail. In space, "it would be an expanding sphere of smoke from the tip of the barrel," said Peter Schultz an astronomer at Brown University who researches impact craters. The possibility of gunfire in space allows...
  • The Unusual Physics of Floating Pyramids

    02/17/2012 2:53:08 PM PST · by neverdem · 8 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 7 February 2012 | Kate McAlpine
    Enlarge Image Heavy bass. This subwoofer plays a constant beat that pumps the air up and down inside the wind tunnel. The diffusers allow air to flow without turbulence so that the paper pyramid floats inside. Credit: Bin Liu Think that floating pyramids are more metaphysics than physics? Think again. Results just in from an experiment that levitated open-bottomed paper pyramids on gusts of air reveal a curious phenomenon: When it comes to drifting through the air, top-heavy designs are more stable than bottom-heavy ones. The finding may lead to robots that fly not like insects or birds but...
  • Hot Idea for a Faster Hard Drive

    02/16/2012 8:16:39 PM PST · by neverdem · 29 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 7 February 2012 | Jim Heirbaut
    Enlarge Image Laser-induced switching. Experimental images showing two small domains with magnetic orientation up (white) and down (black). Each laser pulse reverses the direction repeatedly. Credit: Johan Mentink; Richard Evans (inset) An ultrashort heat pulse can predictably flip a bit in a magnetic memory like the one in your hard drive. The surprising effect could ultimately lead to magnetic memories hundreds of times faster and more energy efficient than today's hard drives. It also provides a way to control the direction in which a bit is magnetized without applying something else that has a direction, such as a magnetic...
  • 5 of the biggest unsolved mysteries in physics

    01/31/2012 2:06:57 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 69 replies · 1+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 1/31/12 | Tecca - Today in Tech
    The mysteries of the universe are as vast and wide as existence itself. Throughout history, mankind has searched and struggled to find the answers tucked away inside the universe and everything we see around us. .. True, we have yet to come up with the answers to life, the universe, and everything — but oh do we have questions! Solving these mysteries may help to explain not only the creation of the universe, but also how it works, why it works, and possibly how it will end. 1. The Higgs boson The Higgs boson is a hypothetical particle whose accompanying...
  • Stripped down spectroscopy to probe single molecules

    01/16/2012 10:20:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Chemistry World ^ | 16 January 2012 | Kate McAlpine
    Spectroscopy, a key method of identifying atoms and molecules with light, has been taken to its most fundamental level - a single photon absorbed by a single molecule. In addition to paving the way toward new experiments that observe the interaction between light and matter at its most basic level, the researchers that accomplished the feat suggest that their technique could also work with other photon-emitters, including those under study for quantum communication.Spectroscopy works by finding the frequencies of light that will put an atom or molecule into an excited state - these comprise the chemical's unique absorption and emission...
  • Any other fans out there of "Fabric of the Cosmos?"

    01/07/2012 4:45:46 AM PST · by PJ-Comix · 40 replies
    Self | January 6, 2012 | PJ-Comix
    Are there any other fans of FABRIC OF THE COSMOS out there? I found it to be perhaps the most fascinating science show ever produced. The information in the show is nothing less than stunning and definitely changed my view of the universe. Some of the information is so stunning that it is hard to comprehend. But guess what? Even physicists have a hard time getting their minds around it. And an oatmeal cookie to the first person who can post who the major backer of this series is.
  • CO Driver Killed By Branch Steered Car To Safety

    01/01/2012 6:04:21 PM PST · by edpc · 14 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 1 Jan 2012 | AP
    BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — A Colorado man who was killed when a 3-foot tree branch flew through his windshield and impaled him in the chest was able to steer the car to safety before losing consciousness. The wife of 61-year-old James Baker-Jarvis told the Daily Camera (http://goo.gl/WsaHg ) that her husband was able to pull the Subaru Outback over to the roadside, saving her from any injury. Baker-Jarvis died later at a hospital.
  • Has the 'God Particle' Been Found? Major Announcement Expected Tuesday

    12/13/2011 8:13:39 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    Fox News ^ | 12/13/2011
    The world of physics is abuzz with speculation over an announcement expected Tuesday, Dec. 13, from the CERN laboratory in Geneva -- home of the world's largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The announcement, planned for 8 a.m. EST, will address the status of the search for the elusive Higgs boson particle, sometimes called the "God Particle" because of its importance to science This particle, which has long been theorized but never detected, is thought to give all other particles mass. Scientists at the LHC have been hoping that when protons inside the machine collide together at extremely...
  • Physicists Anxiously Await New Data on ‘God Particle’

    12/12/2011 10:28:18 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | December 11, 2011 | DENNIS OVERBYE
    High noon is approaching for the biggest manhunt in the history of physics. At 8 a.m. Eastern time on Tuesday morning, scientists from CERN, the European Center for Nuclear Research, are scheduled to give a progress report on the search for the Higgs boson — infamously known as the “God particle” — whose discovery would vindicate the modern theory of how elementary particles get mass. The report comes amid rumors that the two competing armies of scientists sifting debris from hundreds of trillions of proton collisions in CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, or L.H.C., outside Geneva, have both finally seen hints...
  • From Edison’s Trunk, Direct Current Gets Another Look

    11/20/2011 9:56:06 PM PST · by neverdem · 90 replies
    NY Times ^ | November 17, 2011 | MICHAEL KANELLOS
    Thomas Edison and his direct current, or DC, technology lost the so-called War of the Currents to alternating current, or AC, in the 1890s after it became clear that AC was far more efficient at transmitting electricity over long distances. Today, AC is still the standard for the electricity that comes out of our wall sockets. But DC is staging a roaring comeback in pockets of the electrical grid. Alstom, ABB, Siemens and other conglomerates are erecting high-voltage DC grids to carry gigawatts of electricity from wind farms in remote places like western China and the North Sea to faraway...
  • Particle Smasher Hints at Physics Breakthrough

    11/19/2011 9:58:30 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 17 November 2011 | Jon Cartwright
    Enlarge Image Standing proud. The LHCb experiment has uncovered hints of "new physics," but will its results hold up? Credit: CERN In late 2008, a few onlookers believed that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) would bring the end of the world. Three years later, our planet remains intact, but the European particle smasher may have made its first crack in modern physics. If this crack turns out to be real, it might help explain an enduring mystery of the universe: why there's lots of normal matter, but hardly any of the opposite—antimatter. "If it holds up, it's exciting," says...
  • Cosmic Origins - Trailer

    11/18/2011 6:23:25 PM PST · by firerosemom · 18 replies
    Magis Institute for Reason and Faith ^ | Spring 2012 release | Magis Institute for Reason and Faith
    There is extensive evidence from physics for a beginning and fine-tuning of the universe. When the complementary nature of these insights is seen, it provides compelling evidence for a transcendent, intelligent Creator. Cosmic Origins features eight world-class physicists talking about modern physics and God. They include Nobel Laureate Arno Penzias (who discovered the background radiation from the Big Bang); Templeton Prize winners John Polkinghorne (Cambridge) and Michael Heller (Vatican Observatory); Owen Gingerich (Harvard); Lisa Randall (Harvard); Jennifer Wiseman (NASA); and narrated by Stephen Barr (University of Delaware).
  • 2nd test affirms faster-than-light particles

    11/18/2011 11:53:59 AM PST · by TN4Liberty · 105 replies
    CBSnews.com ^ | November 18, 2011 | Brian Vastag
    A second experiment at the European facility that reported subatomic particles zooming faster than the speed of light -- stunning the world of physics -- has reached the same result, scientists said late Thursday. The "positive outcome of the [second] test makes us more confident in the result," said Fernando Ferroni, president of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics, in a statement released late Thursday. Ferroni is one of 160 physicists involved in the international collaboration known as OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion Tracking Apparatus) that performed the experiment. While the second experiment "has made an important test of consistency...
  • World's Lightest Solid Takes Inspiration From Eiffel Tower

    11/18/2011 10:04:41 AM PST · by edpc · 25 replies · 1+ views
    Live Science via Yahoo News ^ | 18 Nov 2011 | Charles Choi
    A metallic lattice of hair-thin pipes is now the lightest solid yet created — less dense than air, scientists revealed. The strategy used to create these intricate structures could lead to revolutionary materials of extraordinary strength and lightness, including ones made of diamond, researchers added. Ultra-lightweight materials such as foams are widely used in thermal insulation and to dampen sounds, vibrations and shocks. They can also serve as scaffolds for battery electrodes and catalytic systems.
  • Proof found for unifying quantum principle: Twenty-three-year-old conjecture set to guide...

    11/16/2011 5:53:30 PM PST · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Nature News ^ | 14 November 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    Twenty-three-year-old conjecture set to guide future quantum field theories. When John Cardy proposed a far-reaching principle to constrain all possible theories of quantum particles and fields1, he expected it to be quickly rebutted. But for almost 25 years that hasn’t happened — and it now seems that his theorem may have been quietly proved earlier this year. If the solution holds, it is likely to guide future attempts to explain physics beyond the current standard model. It will certainly have implications for any previously unknown particles that may be discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Europe’s particle...
  • Using Light to Flip a Tiny Mechanical Switch by on

    10/26/2011 12:03:16 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 23 October 2011 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Flipping brilliant! Using only light, scientists can switch this little bridge of silicon between its "bowed up" configuration (top) and its "bowed down" configuration. Credit: M. Bagheri et al., Nature Nanotechnology, Advance Online Publication (2011) The feeble force of light alone can flip a nanometer-sized mechanical switch one way or the other, a team of electrical engineers reports. The little gizmo holds its position without power and at room temperature, so it might someday make a memory bit for an optical computer. Other researchers say it also introduces a promising new twist into the hot field of...
  • Finding puts brakes on faster-than-light neutrinos

    10/21/2011 10:47:39 AM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    Nature News ^ | 20 October 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    An independent experiment confirms that subatomic particles have wrong energy spectrum for superluminal travel. The claim that neutrinos can travel faster than light has been given a knock by an independent experiment. On 17 October, the Imaging Cosmic and Rare Underground Signals (ICARUS) collaboration submitted a paper1 to the preprint server arXiv.org, in which it offered a rebuttal of claims2 to have clocked subatomic particles called neutrinos travelling faster than the speed of light. The original results were published on 22 September by the Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus (OPERA) experiment. Both experiments are based at Gran Sasso National Laboratory...
  • Space Weather Forecasters Get Serious

    10/21/2011 1:30:58 AM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 20 October 2011 | Richard A. Kerr
    Enlarge Image Watch out! A new forecast model simulates the approach of a coronal mass ejection (boomerang of color) to Earth (green dot) that would trigger a solar storm. Credit: Space Weather Prediction Center/NOAA It took a while, but space physicists who predict immense balls of solar debris smashing into Earth have finally caught up with their brethren who forecast terrestrial weather. Rather than simply relying on rules of thumb, space weather forecasters have begun running a computer model that actually simulates the development of conditions between the sun and Earth. They're following the lead of atmospheric weather forecasters,...