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Keyword: physics

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Particle Physics On The Cheap

    04/13/2015 1:56:28 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 4 replies
    Inside Science ^ | 4-13-2015 | Ben Stein
    Thinking of particle physics experiments may inspire images of huge, multibillion-dollar facilities, such as Europe's Large Hadron Collider. But exploring the secrets of subatomic particles doesn't require a massive financial commitment. Three undergraduate students and their professor have built a particle detector for just a little bit over $500. Their design could help bring particle physics experiments to universities everywhere. The device can detect exotic subatomic particles known as muons, which exist in our midst. Muons are the heavy cousins of electrons, over 200 times greater in mass. When cosmic rays from space smash into molecules in the atmosphere, they...
  • Particle jets reveal the secrets of the most exotic state of matter

    03/15/2015 12:03:33 PM PDT · by samtheman · 18 replies
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/ ^ | March 11, 2015 | The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences
    Shortly following the Big Bang, the Universe was filled with a chaotic primordial soup of quarks and gluons, particles which are now trapped inside of protons and neutrons. Study of this quark-gluon plasma requires the use of the most advanced theoretical and experimental tools. Physicists have taken one crucial step towards a better understanding of the plasma and its properties.
  • Infinity Is a Beautiful Concept – And It’s Ruining Physics

    02/20/2015 6:01:20 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 94 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | 2/20/15 | Max Tegmark
    Infinity Is a Beautiful Concept – And It’s Ruining Physics By Max Tegmark | February 20, 2015 9:00 am I was seduced by infinity at an early age. Georg Cantor’s diagonality proof that some infinities are bigger than others mesmerized me, and his infinite hierarchy of infinities blew my mind. The assumption that something truly infinite exists in nature underlies every physics course I’ve ever taught at MIT—and, indeed, all of modern physics. But it’s an untested assumption, which begs the question: Is it actually true?A Crisis in Physics There are in fact two separate assumptions: “infinitely big” and “infinitely...
  • Come out, come out, wherever you are!

    02/04/2015 2:55:51 AM PST · by samtheman · 10 replies
    The Economist ^ | Jan 3, 2015 | The Economist
    IN MARCH, after a two-year shut down for an upgrade, the world’s biggest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will reopen for business. The rest of the year will see physicists biting their nails—for one way or another 2015 will go down as a famous date in their field. Either theoreticians will be proved spectacularly right, and experimenters can move confidently on into the verdant pastures of so-called new physics, engaging in a positive safari of hunting for novel particles, or they will find out, to exaggerate only slightly, that they do not understand how the universe really works.
  • The supersymmetry calamity

    01/31/2015 9:06:49 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 25 replies
    Winnipeg Free Press ^ | 1/31/15 | Colin Gillespie
    Enlarge Image It sounds esoteric, like an episode of The Big Bang Theory, and maybe someday it will be. But even in the fields of physics, supersymmetry is esoteric. What is supersymmetry? What is the calamity? Why should you care?What it is... is an idea: particular superheroes! Here's their story. The standard model is the crown jewel of physics. All you need to know is it describes subatomic particles and the forces that affect them. It has 16 kinds of particles: six quarks, six leptons and four bosons. Lately, headlines tell us add the Higgs. The standard model depicts...
  • Particles accelerate without a push (But Newton's not dead)

    01/25/2015 10:48:22 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 8 replies
    MIT News Office ^ | 1/20/15 | David L. Chandler
    New analysis shows a way to self-propel subatomic particles, extend the lifetime of unstable isotopes. David L. Chandler | MIT News Office January 20, 2015 Press Inquiries Some physical principles have been considered immutable since the time of Isaac Newton: Light always travels in straight lines. No physical object can change its speed unless some outside force acts on it. Not so fast, says a new generation of physicists: While the underlying physical laws haven’t changed, new ways of “tricking” those laws to permit seemingly impossible actions have begun to appear. For example, work that began in 2007 proved that...
  • Epic cosmic radio burst finally seen in real time

    01/20/2015 10:42:42 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 08:00 19 January 2015 | by Michael Slezak
    A gigantic but fleeting burst of radio waves has been caught in the act for the first time, helping to narrow down the vast array of things that might cause them. Figuring out what these fast radio bursts are or where they come from could help answer some of the biggest cosmological questions. They last about a millisecond but give off as much energy as the sun does in a day, all seemingly in a tight band of radio-frequency waves. Their source is a mystery, but whatever causes them must be huge, cataclysmic and up to 5.5 billion light years...
  • The Chameleon in the Vacuum Chamber (physics, dark energy)

    01/14/2015 10:38:37 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    The Chameleon in the Vacuum Chamber A new proposal for an experiment that could test the presence of a fifth force with unprecedented precision. It still amazes me that everything I see is made up of only some few dozen particles and four interactions. For all we know. But maybe this isn’t all there is? Physicists have been speculating for a while now that our universe needs a fifth fundamental force, one responsible for the phenomenon of dark energy, to maintain the observed expansion rate. Although this idea has been around for more than a decade, it has turned...
  • Quantum physics just got less complicated

    12/19/2014 11:34:49 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 76 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12/19/14
    Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing. The result is published 19 December in Nature Communications. Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner made the breakthrough while at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one."The connection between uncertainty and wave-particle duality comes out very naturally when you...
  • Fun with Vortex Rings in the Pool

    12/19/2014 12:56:52 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    YouTube ^ | 12/1714 | PhysicsGirl
    Video here.
  • A New Physics Theory of Life

    12/10/2014 2:18:28 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 45 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 1/22/14 | Natalie Wolchover
    A New Physics Theory of Life Katherine Taylor for Quanta MagazineJeremy England, a 31-year-old physicist at MIT, thinks he has found the underlying physics driving the origin and evolution of life. By: Natalie WolchoverJanuary 22, 2014 Comments (151) print Why does life exist?Popular hypotheses credit a primordial soup, a bolt of lightning and a colossal stroke of luck. But if a provocative new theory is correct, luck may have little to do with it. Instead, according to the physicist proposing the idea, the origin and subsequent evolution of life follow from the fundamental laws of nature and “should be as...
  • Proof of Life

    12/07/2014 8:01:54 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    PJ Media's Belmont Club ^ | December 7, 2014 | Richard Fernandez
    The intellectual role that used to be occupied by theology is now largely filled by science fiction. Wikipedia lists only a dozen of possibly hundreds of books where writers, some of them practicing mathematicians or scientists themselves, examine the consequences of our current understanding of the universe. The familiar, everyday world that we know isn’t what it seems. It is actually a strange place. On large scales it isn’t governed by ‘common sense’ Newtonian physics but by the paradoxes of relativity. At very small scales, perhaps at its foundation, it is governed by quantum phenomena, which is stranger still. Arthur...
  • Dark matter could be seen in GPS time glitches

    11/19/2014 4:56:35 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | November 17, 2014 | Hal Hodson
    GPS has a new job. It does a great job of telling us our location, but the network of hyper-accurate clocks in space could get a fix on something far more elusive: dark matter. Dark matter makes up 80 per cent of the universe's matter but scarcely interacts with ordinary matter. A novel particle is the most popular candidate, but Andrei Derevianko at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Maxim Pospelov at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada propose that kinks or cracks in the quantum fields that permeate the universe could be the culprit. If they are right,...
  • String Theory: Now Circling the Drain

    10/30/2014 7:58:13 AM PDT · by C19fan · 61 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | October 30, 2014 | Tom Hartsfield
    The largest physics experiment ever built is now testing the nature of reality. String theory, supersymmetry and other theories beyond the Standard Model are under scrutiny. More than 10,000 people have been involved. Total cost is nearing $10 billion. This, of course, is the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which helped discover the Higgs Boson. Simultaneously, the ACME experiment, run by a team of less than 50, built for a few million dollars (and much, much smaller), has created a more precise test of these advanced theoeries. This experiment hinges on an extremely painstaking and precise method to picture the shape...
  • New Exotic Particle Could Help Explain What Holds Matter Together

    10/14/2014 9:40:48 PM PDT · by lbryce · 54 replies
    Live Science ^ | October 14, 2014 | Kelly Dickerson
    A new exotic particle has been hiding out amidst the gobs of data collected by the world's largest atom smasher, physicists have discovered. The new particle, called Ds3*, is a meson — a type of unstable particle made of one quark and one antiquark. Quarks are subatomic particles and are the most basic building blocks of matter that make up protons and neutrons. They're held together by the strong interaction, or strong force, that is one of the four fundamental forces in nature. (Electromagnetism, weak interaction and gravity are the other three.) No stable form of matter would exist without...
  • Astrophysicists Reveal Amount of Dark Matter is Less Than Previously Thought

    10/10/2014 1:00:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 68 replies
    SciTech Daily ^ | 10/09/2014 | Source: International Center for Radio Astronomy Research
    New research from the University of Western Australia reveals that the amount of dark matter in the Milky Way is half as much as previously thought. Australian astronomers used a method developed almost 100 years ago to discover that the weight of dark matter in our own galaxy is 800,000,000,000 (or 8 x 1011) times the mass of the Sun. They probed the edge of the Milky Way, looking closely, for the first time, at the fringes of the galaxy about 5 million billion kilometers from Earth. Astrophysicist Dr Prajwal Kafle, from The University of Western Australia node of the...
  • Our quantum problem

    09/29/2014 4:34:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    Aeon ^ | 1/28/14 | Adrian Kent
    In 1909, Ernest Rutherford, Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden took a piece of radium and used it to fire charged particles at a sheet of gold foil. They wanted to test the then-dominant theory that atoms were simply clusters of electrons floating in little seas of positive electrical charge (the so-called ‘plum pudding’ model). What came next, said Rutherford, was ‘the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life’. Despite the airy thinness of the foil, a small fraction of the particles bounced straight back at the source – a result, Rutherford noted, ‘as incredible as...
  • Air Show Math

    09/14/2014 8:19:53 PM PDT · by rey · 72 replies
    Vanity | 14 Sept. 2014 | Rey
    I home school a young girl. In years past, we have gone to the local air show and done such things as measure the tops and bottom of wings and rotos and figure the ratio or difference between the area of the top of the wing versus the bottom and estimated which wings had more lift than others. We measure how much area the wheels occupied on the ground and consulted with the crew chief what the tire pressure was and calculated the weight of the plane. In years past we were able to see F18s form a vapor cone...
  • Schrödinger's cat caught on quantum film

    08/27/2014 7:37:18 PM PDT · by Sparklite · 68 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 27 August 2014 | Penny Sarchet
    Schrödinger's cat is the poster child for quantum weirdness. Now it has been immortalised in a portrait created by one of the theory's strangest consequences: quantum entanglement. These images were generated using a cat stencil and entangled photons. The really spooky part is that the photons used to generate the image never interacted with the stencil, while the photons that illuminated the stencil were never seen by the camera.
  • The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?

    08/10/2014 8:20:11 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 7/29/14
    The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? Jul 29, 2014 Enlarge The basic idea of the Quantum Cheshire Cat: In an interferometer, an object is separated from one if its properties -- like a cat, moving on a different path than its own grin. Credit: TU Vienna / Leon Filter The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland" is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from its properties? It is possible in the quantum world. In an experiment, neutrons travel...
  • NASA: New "impossible" engine works, could change space travel forever

    08/02/2014 12:16:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 73 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | August 1, 2014 | Jesus Diaz
    Until yesterday, every physicist was laughing at this engine and its inventor, Roger Shawyer. It's called the EmDrive and everyone said it was impossible because it goes against classical mechanics. But the fact is that the quantum vacuum plasma thruster works and scientists can't explain why. Shawyer's engine is extremely light and simple. It provides a thrust by "bouncing microwaves around in a closed container." The microwaves are generated using electricity that can be provided by solar energy. No propellant is necessary, which means that this thrusters can work forever unless a hardware failure occurs. If real, this would be...
  • Update on Podkletnov gravity modification work and rumors

    06/18/2014 1:36:15 AM PDT · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | 5-14-2014 | Brian Wang
    American Antigravity interviewed Eugene Podkletnov to discuss recent (2004 to 2013) experimental antigravity research in gravity modification and superconductors. For nearly two decades Dr. Podkletnov has been researching the link between gravitation and high-temperature superconductors, and just recently published the peer-review results of new experiments he’s conducted to measure the speed of a force-beam projected by a stationary superconducting apparatus he’s developed. Podkletnov is well-known for his experiments involving YBCO superconductors, which produced a gravity-shielding effect that was investigated by NASA and has been the subject of many peer-review papers. He describes continuing his experiments in this area, and indicates...
  • Low-Cost Fusion Project Steps Out of the Shadows and Looks for Money

    06/14/2014 3:40:55 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    NBC News ^ | June 13, 2014 | Alan Boyle
    A hush-hush nuclear fusion project that's received $12 million from the U.S. Navy is now sharing what it calls encouraging results — and looking for private investment. For years, EMC2 Fusion Development Corp. has had to conduct its research into what's known as Polywell fusion outside public view because the Navy wanted it that way. Now the Navy is phasing out its funding, and EMC2 Fusion is planning a three-year, $30 million commercial research program to see if its unorthodox approach can provide a fast track to cheap nuclear fusion power. "The goal is, we want to get a set...
  • Scientists discover how to turn light into matter after 80-year quest

    05/19/2014 3:08:29 AM PDT · by markomalley · 24 replies
    Physics ^ | 5/18/2014
    Imperial College London physicists have discovered how to create matter from light - a feat thought impossible when the idea was first theorised 80 years ago. In just one day over several cups of coffee in a tiny office in Imperial's Blackett Physics Laboratory, three physicists worked out a relatively simple way to physically prove a theory first devised by scientists Breit and Wheeler in 1934.Breit and Wheeler suggested that it should be possible to turn light into matter by smashing together only two particles of light (photons), to create an electron and a positron – the simplest method of...
  • Physicists Discover How to Change the Crystal Structure of Graphene

    05/01/2014 9:41:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies
    SciTech Daily ^ | May 1, 2014 | NA
    Graphene trilayers can be stacked in two different configurations, which can occur naturally in the same flake. They are separated by a sharp boundary. (Image: Pablo San-Jose ICMM-CSI) A team of researchers has discovered how to change the crystal structure of graphene, a finding that could lead to smaller and faster microprocessors.A University of Arizona-led team of physicists has discovered how to change the crystal structure of graphene, more commonly known as pencil lead, with an electric field, an important step toward the possible use of graphene in microprocessors that would be smaller and faster than current, silicon-based technology.Graphene consists...
  • Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's famous 1927 principle

    04/29/2014 10:27:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-29-2014 | Provided by American Institute of Physics
    Nearly 90 years after Werner Heisenberg pioneered his uncertainty principle, a group of researchers from three countries has provided substantial new insight into this fundamental tenet of quantum physics with the first rigorous formulation supporting the uncertainty principle as Heisenberg envisioned it. In the Journal of Mathematical Physics, the researchers reports a new way of defining measurement errors that is applicable in the quantum domain and enables a precise characterization of the fundamental limits of the information accessible in quantum experiments. Quantum mechanics requires that we devise approximate joint measurements because the theory itself prohibits simultaneous ideal measurements of position...
  • Could this particle rewrite modern physics? Discovery of 4-quark hadron...

    04/16/2014 7:00:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | April 16, 2014 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    Scientists at CERN have confirmed the existence of a new 'exotic' particle International team used the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) detector The particle was first detected in 2007 but it has only now been confirmed Dubbed Z(4430), the discovery challenges existing models of physics It may also indicate that a new type of neutron star, a quark star, existsIn the early 1930s, scientists were fairly confident they understood subatomic physics. That was until dozens of new elementary particles were discovered in the 1950s, forcing scientists to rewrite their models. Now a new particle, first detected in 2007 but not...
  • New Super-Accurate Atomic Clock Tells Time Like No Other

    04/03/2014 6:09:54 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 67 replies
    NBC News ^ | 03 April 2014 | James Eng
    "It has an accuracy that's equivalent to about one second in 300 million years." - "If we've learned anything in the last 60 years of building atomic clocks, we've learned that every time we build a better clock, somebody comes up with a use for it that you couldn't have foreseen."
  • Univ. of Leicester students: Noah’s Ark would've floated w/ two each of 35,000 species of animal

    04/03/2014 3:39:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 49 replies
    News Corp Australia ^ | April 4, 2014
    NOAH’S Ark would have floated — even with two of every animal on board, physicists have determined based on the weight of the beasts and the buoyancy of the boat. The students from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester who came to this conclusion used the dimensions for the boat that were given in the Bible. In the book of Genesis, Noah is commanded to build an ark which is 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits high to house himself, his family and two of every species of animal. For the study,...
  • American Physical Society: The First Major Scientific Institution To Reject Global Warming ?

    03/21/2014 9:18:28 AM PDT · by Innovative · 41 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | March 20, 2014 | James Delingpole
    The American Physical Society (APS) has signalled a dramatic turnabout in its position on "climate change" by appointing three notorious climate skeptics to its panel on public affairs (POPA). If that list looks impressive, perhaps it's worth reminding ourselves of Hal Lewis's theory as to why so many scientific institutions have fallen for the scam. There are indeed trillions of dollars involved, to say nothing of the fame and glory (and frequent trips to exotic islands) that go with being a member of the club. Your own Physics Department (of which you are chairman) would lose millions a year if...
  • New Israeli Lab Seeks to Punch a Hole in Spacetime, Literally

    03/14/2014 5:34:30 PM PDT · by lbryce · 40 replies
    Haaretz ^ | March 14, 2014 | do Efrati
    Imagine that something is happening before your eyes, but you can’t see it — not because you have eye trouble or because it’s a microscopic event, but because of something like Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak. Two years ago, researchers from Cornell University made that fantasy come true, on a tiny scale. They not only hid the existence of a brief event — the movement of a light ray from one point to another — but also the fact that it had been hidden. One of the lead researchers on that study, Moti Friedman, is now setting up his own physics...
  • Closing the 'free will' loophole: Using distant quasars to test Bell's theorem

    02/26/2014 9:08:05 AM PST · by onedoug · 94 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 20 Feb 2014 | MIT Team
    Astronomers propose an experiment that may close the last major loophole of Bell's inequality -- a 50-year-old theorem that, if violated by experiments, would mean that our universe is based not on the textbook laws of classical physics, but on the less-tangible probabilities of quantum mechanics. Such a quantum view would allow for seemingly counterintuitive phenomena such as entanglement, in which the measurement of one particle instantly affects another, even if those entangled particles are at opposite ends of the universe. Among other things, entanglement -- a quantum feature Albert Einstein skeptically referred to as "spooky action at a distance"...
  • Speed of light may not be constant, physicists say (Whoops)

    04/29/2013 6:40:36 PM PDT · by equalator · 59 replies
    Fox Live Science ^ | 4-29-2013 | Jesse Emspak
    The speed of light is constant, or so textbooks say. But some scientists are exploring the possibility that this cosmic speed limit changes, a consequence of the nature of the vacuum of space. The definition of the speed of light has some broader implications for fields such as cosmology and astronomy, which assume a stable velocity for light over time. For instance, the speed of light comes up when measuring the fine structure constant (alpha), which defines the strength of the electromagnetic force. And a varying light speed would change the strengths of molecular bonds and the density of nuclear
  • The First Test That Proves General Theory of Relativity Wrong

    02/20/2014 3:47:32 PM PST · by Kevmo · 290 replies
    Softpedia.com ^ | March 24th, 2006, 12:39 GMT · | By Vlad Tarko
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-First-Test-That-Proves-General-Theory-of-Relativity-Wrong-20259.shtml According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, a moving mass should create another field, called gravitomagnetic field, besides its static gravitational field. This field has now been measured for the first time and to the scientists' astonishment, it proved to be no less than one hundred million trillion times larger than Einstein's General Relativity predicts. According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, a moving mass should create another field, called gravitomagnetic field, besides its static gravitational field. This field has now been measured for the first time and to the scientists' astonishment, it proved to be no less than...
  • Baby Steps on the Road to Fusion Energy

    02/13/2014 1:06:21 AM PST · by neverdem · 5 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 12 February 2014 | Daniel Clery
    Dr. Eddie DewaldA millimeter-sized fuel capsule inside its target can, or hohlraum. As it approaches its fifth birthday, the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a troubled laser fusion facility in California, has finally produced some results that fusion scientists can get enthusiastic about. In a series of experiments late last year, NIF researchers managed to produce energy yields 10 times greater than produced before and to demonstrate the phenomenon of self-heating that will be crucial if fusion is to reach its ultimate goal of “ignition”—a self-sustaining burning reaction that produces more energy than it consumes.“This is a very significant achievement, and...
  • Why Hawking is Wrong About Black Holes

    02/01/2014 1:03:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 1, 2014 | Brian Koberlein on
    Black holes can radiate in a way that agrees with thermodynamics, and the region near the event horizon doesn’t have a firewall, just as general relativity requires. So Hawking’s proposal is a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist.
  • Parallel Worlds Exist And Will Soon Be Testable, Expert Says

    01/16/2014 12:31:17 PM PST · by GrandJediMasterYoda · 84 replies
    themindunleashed.org ^ | 1/16/14 | By: Dick Pelletier
    Parallel Worlds Exist And Will Soon Be Testable, Expert Says By: Dick Pelletier Is there another you reading this article at this exact moment in a parallel universe? Dr. Brian Greene, author of The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, believes that this freakish quirk of nature may exist; and he discusses its amazing possibilities in this 3-minute TV interview. A growing number of cosmologists agree with Greene that we are but one of many universes and at least one of these other worlds lies close to ours, maybe only a millimeter away. We can’t...
  • Are we living in a HOLOGRAM? Physicists believe our universe just a projection of another cosmos

    12/16/2013 3:47:30 AM PST · by NYer · 74 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2013 | ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD
    The universe is a hologram and everything you can see - including this article and the device you are reading it on - is a mere projection. This is according to a controversial model proposed in 1997 by theoretical physicist Juan Maldacena.Until now the bizarre theory had never been tested, but recent mathematical models suggest that the mind-boggling principle could be true.Professor Maldacena's model suggests that the universe exists in nine dimensions of space and one of time.Now Japanese researchers have attempted to tackle this problem by providing mathematical evidence that the holographic principle might be correct, according to a...
  • New superconductor theory may revolutionize electrical engineering

    12/08/2013 6:38:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 28 replies
    Phys.org ^ | December 6, 2013 | Bill Steele
    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a frustratingly varied catalog of odd behavior, such as electrons that arrange themselves into stripes or refuse to arrange themselves symmetrically around atoms. Now two physicists propose that such behaviors – and superconductivity itself – can all be traced to a single starting point, and they explain why there are so many variations. This theory might be a step toward new, higher-temperature superconductors that would revolutionize electrical engineering with more efficient motors and generators and lossless power transmission. -snip- Most subatomic particles have a tiny magnetic field – a property physicists call "spin" – and electrical resistance...
  • Nobel-Winning Physicist Rebukes Atheist Extremists

    10/13/2013 11:40:21 AM PDT · by CHRISTIAN DIARIST · 18 replies
    The Christian Diarist ^ | October 13, 2013 | JP
    The atheist community hailed last year’s scientific confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson, for which the British theoretical physicist Peter Higgs was co-recipient this past week of the Nobel Prize in Physics. Higgs had theorized, all the way back in 1964, that there must be something that gives subatomic particles their mass, which enables them to form atoms, which, in turn, form molecules, all of which is integral to creation as we know it. That something turned out to be the Higgs boson. And its discovery, declared Dan Barker, co-president of the so-called Freedom From Religion Foundation, an...
  • Higgs Boson, Key to the Universe, Wins Nobel Physics Prize

    10/08/2013 6:58:33 AM PDT · by lbryce · 45 replies
    Reuters via Yahoo ^ | October 8, 2013 | Simon Johnson and Johan Ahlander
    Britain's Peter Higgs and Francois Englert of Belgium won the Nobel Prize for physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle that explains how elementary matter attained the mass to form stars and planets. The insight has been hailed as one of the most important in the understanding of the cosmos. Without the Higgs mechanism all particles would travel at the speed of light and atoms would not exist.
  • Humans Could Walk On Water (Ig Nobel Prize)

    10/02/2013 10:02:26 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Ig Nobel Prize in physics goes to research about walking on water on the moon.Every year in December, the Swedish Academy of Sciences hands out Nobel Prizes for the most important discoveries in science. A few months before, in less grand circumstances, the magazine Annals of Improbable Research The Ig Nobels are given to research that ‘first makes people laugh, and then makes them think’. The categories vary year to year but mostly cover science and engineering, with peace and literature occasionally thrown in, too. Previous awards have been handed out to projects like minimizing the risk of colonoscopy...
  • A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

    09/19/2013 5:59:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    SimonsFoundation.org ^ | 9/17/13 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics Artist’s rendering of the amplituhedron, a newly discovered mathematical object resembling a multifaceted jewel in higher dimensions. Encoded in its volume are the most basic features of reality that can be calculated — the probabilities of outcomes of particle interactions. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.“This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has...
  • This physics grad student made a mind-blowing Bohemian Rhapsody cover

    09/18/2013 3:01:18 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 35 replies
    io9 ^ | September 17, 2013 | Robert T. Gonzalez
    Question: What do you get when you mix a cappella, sock puppets, string theory and Queen? Answer: The geekiest (and astonishingly good, musically speaking) cover of "Bohemian Rhapsody" EVAR. Easily the greatest physics-themed cover of the classic we've ever heard.
  • Physics: Quantum quest

    09/16/2013 1:40:34 PM PDT · by neverdem · 28 replies
    Nature News ^ | 11 September 2013 | Philip Ball
    Physicists have spent a century puzzling over the paradoxes of quantum theory. Now a few of them are trying to reinvent it. If the truth be told, few physicists have ever really felt comfortable with quantum theory. Having lived with it now for more than a century, they have managed to forge a good working relationship; physicists now routinely use the mathematics of quantum behaviour to make stunningly accurate calculations about molecular structure, high-energy particle collisions, semiconductor behaviour, spectral emissions and much more. But the interactions tend to be strictly formal. As soon as researchers try to get behind the...
  • Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical [to] the quantum world

    09/09/2013 4:10:37 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/9/13
    Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical the quantum world 10 hours ago Enlarge Principle of the experiment: In the beginning the atom cloud is prepared in an almost perfectly ordered quantum state (symbolized by gray atoms). Over time, this quantum order is lost and disorder spreads through the system with a certain well-defined velocity (symbolized by the mixture of red and gray atoms). This disorder can be associated with the emergence of a temperature. The initial quantum properties are lost only through interactions between the atoms, without any influence from the outside world. How does a...
  • Minute Physics [on youtube]

    09/05/2013 8:53:22 PM PDT · by FlJoePa · 9 replies
    youtube.com ^ | 9-4-13 | minute physics
    Smart people and lots of great 1 minute videos
  • Is naturalness already hidden within the Standard Model?

    09/04/2013 9:47:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 9/2/13 | Jon Butterworth
    Maybe the Standard Model is even more wonderful than it appears. Maybe we really don't need supersymmetry. Plus, other difficult topics, ouzo and a big Greek weddingIn a somewhat bizarre end-of-the-summer interlude, I just spent two nights and a day in Corfu at a Summer Institute on particle physics. Originally I intended to stay longer, but embarrassingly I agreed to give a lecture here months ago and then forgot. I also didn't realise at the time that it coincided with the end of the school holidays... a tricky time when one of your children is starting a new school and...
  • Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time

    08/28/2013 3:33:35 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    Nature ^ | 8/28/13 | Zeeya Merali
    Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behaviour of space and time, but where these entities come from.“Imagine waking up one day and realizing that you actually live inside a computer game,” says Mark Van Raamsdonk, describing what sounds like a pitch for a science-fiction film. But for Van Raamsdonk, a physicist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, this scenario is a way to think about reality. If it is true, he says, “everything around us — the whole three-dimensional physical world — is an illusion born from...
  • Ball lightning captured in the lab

    08/22/2013 8:20:43 PM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 August 2013 | James Urquhart
    US researchers have developed a new way to create glowing orbs of plasma similar to ball lightning in the lab, allowing them to study their chemical and physical properties. The work could help scientists unravel the mysteries of this very rare natural phenomenon.Ball lightning has been known for millennia, but its rarity and short lived nature – typically lasting between 1 and 10 seconds – has prevented it from being studied and understood. In recent years, however, lab experiments that mimic ball lightning have been developed.One method involves a glowing discharge produced above an aqueous electrolyte solution. However, high...