Keyword: pigmanure

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Government Scientists Try to Take the Stink Out of Pig Manure

    09/19/2014 6:43:45 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 40 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 9/18/14 | Mark Peters - WSJ
    PEORIA, Ill.— Terry Whitehead's lab here is stocked with glass boiling flasks, Bunsen burners—and cans of extra-strength air freshener. The microbiologist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture works with pig manure in a quest for something that has largely eluded scientists and entrepreneurs: an affordable way to clear the air in farm country. In a region where hogs can outnumber people, Mr. Whitehead's research is the ultimate icebreaker. "First, you say, 'I work with manure,' and they say, 'What?' Then you say, 'Odor,' and they say, 'Thank God,' " says the lanky 57-year-old, who recently attended the North American Manure...
  • Research: Pig Manure Can Become Crude Oil

    04/13/2004 10:24:01 AM PDT · by m1-lightning · 238 replies · 1,891+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 04/13/04 | JIM PAUL
    URBANA, Ill. - A University of Illinois research team is working on turning pig manure into a form of crude oil that could be refined to heat homes or generate electricity. Years of research and fine-tuning are ahead before the idea could be commercially viable, but results so far indicate there might be big benefits for farmers and consumers, lead researcher Yanhui Zhang said. "This is making more sense in terms of alternative energy or renewable energy and strategically for reducing our dependency on foreign oil," said Zhang, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering. "Definitely, there is potential...
  • Researchers Convert Manure to Crude O

    04/13/2004 6:53:58 AM PDT · by alloysteel · 59 replies · 720+ views
    Associated Press ^ | April 13, 2004 | Jim Paul
    URBANA, Ill. (April 13) - A University of Illinois research team is working on turning pig manure into a form of crude oil that could be refined to heat homes or generate electricity. Years of research and fine-tuning are ahead before the idea could be commercially viable, but results so far indicate there might be big benefits for farmers and consumers, lead researcher Yanhui Zhang said. "This is making more sense in terms of alternative energy or renewable energy and strategically for reducing our dependency on foreign oil," said Zhang, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering. "Definitely, there...