Keyword: pinta

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  • Nicola, jazz fest partner to sponsor replica ships in Lewes May 29-June 1 [Nina, Pinta]

    05/27/2009 6:27:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 293+ views
    Delaware's Cape Gazette ^ | Tuesday, May 26, 2009 | unattributed
    The Pinta and the Nina, replicas of Columbus's ships, will visit Lewes Friday, May 29. The ships will be docked at the City Dock on Front Street until their early morning departure Monday, June 1... The Nina was built by hand and without the use of power tools. She was called "the most historically correct Columbus replica ever built," by Archaeology magazine. Craftmanship of construction and the details in the rigging make it a fascinating visit back to the Age of Discovery. The Nina was used in the production of the film, "1492," starring Gerard Depardieu. "It's an educational vessel...
  • City poised to commit $20K to restore shipNiña needs a new deck, Columbus Fleet:

    01/13/2009 12:56:40 AM PST · by BellStar · 35 replies · 747+ views
    CORPUS CHRISTI —Caller Times ^ | January 13, 2009 | By Sara Foley
    CORPUS CHRISTI — The city is likely to commit $20,000 toward restoring the one ship in the Columbus replica fleet that's still floating, Mayor Henry Garrett said Monday, describing a proposed partnership with the Consulate of Spain in Houston. "I believe spending $20,000 to get the ship in tip-top shape would be worth it," he said. Under the proposed agreement, the city's money would pay for iron and wood to restore the Niña, which is part of a replica fleet of the ships that Christopher Columbus sailed in 1492. In exchange, a group of donors that includes the Mitchell Foundation...
  • The Pinta, Santa Maria And A Chinese Junk? (More)

    02/03/2003 3:18:04 PM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 4,342+ views
    Christian Science Moniter ^ | 1-29-2003 | Amanda Paulson
    from the January 29, 2003 edition The Pinta, Santa Maria, and a Chinese junk? A new book claims the Chinese discovered America in 1421, but historians refute thesis. By Amanda Paulson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor To the Norsemen, the Japanese, and the Carthaginians; to the Irish, the Africans, and a long list of others who, it is claimed, crossed the oceans to America long before 1492, add one more: the Chinese. They toured up and down both coasts of the Americas, established colonies, made maps, and left behind chickens. That, at least, is the theory posed...