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Keyword: pleiades

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Pleiades Deep and Dusty

    02/25/2014 4:03:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | February 25, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The well known Pleiades star cluster is slowly destroying part of a passing cloud of gas and dust. The Pleiades is the brightest open cluster of stars on Earth's sky and can be seen from almost any northerly location with the unaided eye. The passing young dust cloud is thought to be part of Gould's belt, an unusual ring of young star formation surrounding the Sun in the local Milky Way Galaxy. Over the past 100,000 years, part of Gould's belt is by chance moving right through the older Pleiades and is causing a strong reaction between stars and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Gegenschein Over Chile

    01/14/2014 4:49:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | January 14, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Is the night sky darkest in the direction opposite the Sun? No. In fact, a rarely discernable faint glow known as the gegenschein (German for "counter glow") can be seen 180 degrees around from the Sun in an extremely dark sky. The gegenschein is sunlight back-scattered off small interplanetary dust particles. These dust particles are millimeter sized splinters from asteroids and orbit in the ecliptic plane of the planets. Pictured above from last year is one of the more spectacular pictures of the gegenschein yet taken. Here a deep exposure of an extremely dark sky over Las Campanas Observatory...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- From California to the Pleiades

    11/22/2013 4:03:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | November 22, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: An astronomical trip from the California Nebula to the Pleiades star cluster would cover just over 12 degrees across planet Earth's night sky. That's equivalent to the angular extent of 25 Full Moons, as your telescope sweeps past the borders of the constellations Perseus and Taurus. This wide and deep mosaic image of the region explores the cosmic landscape's dusty nebulae and colors otherwise too faint for your eye to see. On the left, cataloged as NGC 1499, the California Nebula does have a familiar shape, though its coastline is actually over 60 light-years long and lies about 1,500...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M45: The Pleiades Star Cluster

    09/18/2013 7:05:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | September 18, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever seen the Pleiades star cluster? Even if you have, you probably have never seen it as dusty as this. Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. With a long exposure from a dark location, though, the dust cloud surrounding the Pleiades star cluster becomes very evident. The above exposure took about 20 minutes and covers a sky area several times the size of the full moon. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Bright Jupiter in Taurus

    11/27/2012 3:22:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | November 27, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: That bright star you've recently noticed rising just after sunset isn't a star at all. It's Jupiter, the solar system's ruling gas giant. Bright Jupiter is nearing its December 3rd opposition when it will stand in Taurus, opposite the Sun in planet Earth's sky. Clearly outshining yellowish Aldebaran, alpha star of Taurus, Jupiter is centered in this skyview from November 14th, also featuring the Pleiades and Hyades star clusters, familiar celestial sights as the northern hemisphere winter approaches. Sliding your cursor over the image will label the scene and identify two other solar system worlds approaching their opposition in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Zodiacal Light and Milky Way

    10/21/2012 6:20:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | October 20, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Ghostly apparitions of two fundamental planes in planet Earth's sky span this October all-sky view. The scene was captured from a lakeside campsite under dark skies in northern Maine, USA. In it, the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy arcs above faint airglow along the horizon. Zodiacal light, a band of dust scattering sunlight along the solar system's ecliptic plane, stretches almost horizontally across the wide field and intersects the Milky way near a point marked by bright planet Jupiter. Right of Jupiter, past the Pleiades star cluster, is the brightening of the Zodiacal band known as the Gegenschein,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M45: The Pleiades Star Cluster

    09/03/2012 12:23:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    NASA ^ | September 03, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades is one of the brightest and closest open clusters. The Pleiades contains over 3000 stars, is about 400 light years away, and only 13 light years across. Quite evident in the above photograph are the blue reflection nebulae that surround the brighter cluster stars. Low mass, faint, brown dwarfs have also been found in the Pleiades. (Editors' note: The prominent diffraction spikes are caused by...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Morning Line of Stars and Planets

    07/11/2012 3:19:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | July 11, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Early morning dog walkers got a visual treat last week as bright stars and planets appeared to line up. Pictured above, easily visible from left to right, were the Pleiades open star cluster, Jupiter, Venus, and the "Follower" star Aldebaran, all seen before a starry background. The image was taken from the Atacama desert in western South America. The glow of the rising Sun can be seen over the eastern horizon. Jupiter and Venus will continue to dazzle pre-dawn strollers all over planet Earth for the rest of the month, although even now the morning planets are seen projected...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Conjunctions near Dawn

    06/30/2012 6:33:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | June 30, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Now shining in eastern skies at dawn, bright planets Venus and Jupiter join the Pleiades star cluster in this sea and sky scape, recorded earlier this week near Buenos Aires, Argentina. Venus dominates the scene that includes bright star Aldebaran just below and to the right. The planets are easy to spot for early morning risers, but this sky also holds two of our solar system's small worlds, Vesta and Ceres, not quite bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye. The digital camera's time exposure just captures them, though. Their positions are indicated when you put your...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Conjunction Haiku

    04/06/2012 9:35:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | April 07, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sister planet stands / together with sister stars. / Celebrate the sky.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Venus and the Sisters

    04/06/2012 9:46:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | April 06, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: After wandering about as far from the Sun on the sky as Venus can get, the brilliant evening star crossed paths with the Pleiades star cluster earlier this week. The beautiful conjunction was enjoyed by skygazers around the world. Taken on April 2, this celestial group photo captures the view from Portal, Arizona, USA. Also known as the Seven Sisters, even the brighter naked-eye Pleiades stars are seen to be much fainter than Venus. And while Venus and the sisters do look star-crossed, their spiky appearance is the diffraction pattern caused by multiple leaves in the aperture of the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Merope's Reflection Nebula

    02/15/2012 3:49:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | February 15, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Reflection nebulas reflect light from a nearby star. Many small carbon grains in the nebula reflect the light. The blue color typical of reflection nebula is caused by blue light being more efficiently scattered by the carbon dust than red light. The brightness of the nebula is determined by the size and density of the reflecting grains, and by the color and brightness of the neighboring star(s). NGC 1435, pictured above, surrounds Merope (23 Tau), one of the brightest stars in the Pleiades (M45). The Pleiades nebulosity is caused by a chance encounter between an open cluster of stars...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Planet Aurora Borealis

    01/28/2012 8:49:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | January 28, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Illuminated by an eerie greenish light, this remarkable little planet is covered with ice and snow and ringed by tall pine trees. Of course, this little planet is actually planet Earth, and the surrounding stars are above the horizon near Östersund, Sweden. The pale greenish illumination is from a curtain of shimmering Aurora Borealis also known as the Northern Lights. The display was triggered when a giant solar coronal mass ejection (CME) rocked planet Earth's magnetosphere on January 24th and produced a strong geomagnetic storm. Northern hemisphere skygazers will also recognize the familiar orientation of stars at the left,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Pleiades to Hyades

    11/17/2011 3:31:03 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1+ views
    NASA ^ | November 17, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This cosmic vista stretches almost 20 degrees across the gentle constellation Taurus. It begins at the Pleiades and ends at the Hyades, two of the best known star clusters in planet Earth's sky. At left, the lovely Pleiades star cluster is about 400 light-years away. In a familiar celestial scene, the cluster stars shine through dusty clouds that scatter blue starlight. At right, the V-shaped Hyades cluster looks more spread out compared to the compact Pleiades and lies much closer, 150 light-years distant. Of course, the Hyades cluster stars seem anchored by bright Aldebaran, a red giant star with...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Pleiades Deep Field

    09/21/2011 7:15:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    NASA ^ | September 21, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever seen the Pleiades star cluster? Even if you have, you probably have never seen it like this: all dusty. Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. With a long exposure from a dark location, though, the dust cloud surrounding the Pleiades star cluster becomes very evident. The above exposure took about 30 hours and covers a sky area several times the size of the full moon. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the...
  • New Observations Show that the Pleiades May be Harboring Earthlike Planets

    01/25/2009 6:39:27 PM PST · by GSP.FAN · 22 replies · 627+ views
    Daily Galaxy ^ | Jan 23 09 | Daily Galaxy
    Rocky terrestrial planets, perhaps like Earth, or Venus, appear to be forming or to have recently formed around a star in the Pleiades star cluster, according to astronomers using the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii and the Spitzer
  • Small planets forming in the Pleiades: astronomers

    11/14/2007 6:36:43 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 11 replies · 109+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 11/15/07 | Reuters
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Small, rocky planets that could resemble the Earth or Mars may be forming around a star in the Pleiades star cluster, astronomers reported on Wednesday. One of the stars in the cluster, also known as the Seven Sisters, is surrounded by an extraordinary number of hot dust particles that could be the "building blocks of planets" said Inseok Song, a staff scientist at NASA's Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology. "This is the first clear evidence for planet formation in the Pleiades, and the results we are presenting may well be the first observational...
  • The UFO Phenomenon - Seeing Is Believing (Peter Jennings tonight - Live Thread)

    02/24/2005 3:55:40 PM PST · by traumer · 1,052 replies · 15,200+ views
    ABC News ^ | Feb. 24, 2005
    Almost 50 percent of Americans, according to recent polls, and millions of people elsewhere in the world believe that UFOs are real. For many it is a deeply held belief. For decades there have been sightings of UFOs by millions and millions of people. It is a mystery that only science can solve, and yet the phenomenon remains largely unexamined. Most of the reporting on this subject by the mainstream media holds those who claim to have seen UFOs up to ridicule. On Feb. 24, "Peter Jennings Reporting: UFOs — Seeing Is Believing" takes a fresh look at the UFO...
  • THEY'RE HEERE (4-Star NYPost Review Praises Peter Jennings for Exposing Gov’t UFO Coverup)

    02/23/2005 7:11:28 AM PST · by dead · 208 replies · 5,373+ views
    NY Post ^ | February 23, 2005 | LINDA STASI
    WHY would a serious journalist like Peter Jennings tackle a silly subject like UFOs? Maybe it's because 40 million Americans can't be wrong. It turns out that 40 million of us have claimed to have seen UFOs, while half — yes, half — of all Americans believe in their existence… < snip > So, why, if millions of people have seen UFOs, are the eyewitnesses immediately reduced to the level of raving loonies (from "lunar")? Interestingly enough, that is the legacy of another successful government PR campaign…< snip > The feds thought they could keep a lid on UFO sightings...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 04-15-04

    04/15/2004 3:33:11 AM PDT · by petuniasevan · 3 replies · 211+ views
    NASA ^ | 04-15-04 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2004 April 15 Venus and the Pleiades Credit & Copyright: David Cortner Explanation: Venus still rules the western skies after sunset as the brilliant evening star. While wandering the ecliptic with its fellow naked-eye planets earlier this month, it passed near the Pleiades star cluster, providing a striking photo opportunity for earthbound skygazers. Cataloged as M45, the Pleiades stars make for a lovely sight on their own, often...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 12-27-03

    12/26/2003 10:14:47 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 6 replies · 359+ views
    NASA ^ | 12-27-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 December 27 The Pleiades Star Cluster Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler Explanation: Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades is one of the brightest and closest open clusters. The Pleiades contains over 3000 stars, is about 400 light years away,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 4-04-03

    04/04/2003 1:28:24 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 12 replies · 353+ views
    NASA ^ | 4-04-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 April 4 Clusters and Nebulae of the Hexagon Credit & Copyright: Axel Mellinger Explanation: At first, the bright stars of the large asterism known as the (northern) Winter Hexagon might be hard to pick out in this gorgeous deep sky mosaic from December 2002. But placing your cursor over the picture will reveal the hexagon's outlines and the bright clusters and nebulae along a stunning portion of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 12-01-02

    11/30/2002 10:16:47 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 6 replies · 275+ views
    NASA ^ | 12-01-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 December 1 The Pleiades Star Cluster Credit & Copyright: David Malin (AAO), ROE, UKS Telescope Explanation: It is the most famous star cluster on the sky. The Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades is one of the brightest and closest open clusters. The Pleiades contains over 3000 stars, is...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 4-29-02

    04/28/2002 10:18:06 PM PDT · by petuniasevan · 8 replies · 317+ views
    NASA ^ | 4-29-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 April 29 Dusk of the Planets Credit & Copyright: Jerry Lodriguss Explanation: A great grouping of planets is now visible to the west just after sunset. Over the next two weeks, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn -- all the planets of the inner Solar System -- can be seen in a single knowing glance. The image on the left captured them all in one frame. Connecting...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 4-18-02

    04/18/2002 2:44:18 PM PDT · by petuniasevan · 11 replies · 242+ views
    NASA ^ | 4-18-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 April 18 Planets in the West Credit & Copyright: John French (Abrams Planetarium, MSU) Explanation: Have you seen any bright planets lately? Chances are if you've been outside under clear skies just after sunset, then you have. Now shining in the west as bright "stars" in the night sky, are all five planets of the solar system known to ancient astronomers - Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and...