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Keyword: pleistocene

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  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • Prehistoric animal remains discovered in U.S.

    08/09/2014 12:18:58 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 12 replies
    abc 25 wpbf ^ | 8-9-2014 | By Jareen Imam
    The cave is cool and damp -- prefect for preserving prehistoric remains, Meachen says. "It's like a refrigerator in there, and probably has been for 20,000 years," she said. "Some of the bones we're finding there have collagen in them. That is where you could get the ancient DNA." The scientists saw bones falling out of a part of the cave, and decided to start digging there. "That was the fossil layer," she said. "There is so much to dig. We have two more years for funding that we can be out there, so we are going to try to...
  • West US cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    07/27/2014 1:48:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 24, 2014 | unattributed
    For the first time in three decades, paleontologists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: The bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave. Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming is 85 feet (25 meters) deep and almost impossible to see until you're standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animalsincluding now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahsshared the misfortune of not noticing the 15-foot-wide (4 meters) opening until they were plunging to their deaths. Now, the U.S. Bureau...
  • Comet theory false; doesn't explain Ice Age cold snap, Clovis changes, animal extinction

    05/17/2014 12:06:11 PM PDT · by Renfield · 44 replies
    Science Codex ^ | 5-13-2014
    Controversy over what sparked the Younger Dryas, a brief return to near glacial conditions at the end of the Ice Age, includes a theory that it was caused by a comet hitting the Earth. As proof, proponents point to sediments containing deposits they believe could result only from a cosmic impact. Now a new study disproves that theory, said archaeologist David Meltzer, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Meltzer is lead author on the study and an expert in the Clovis culture, the peoples who lived in North America at the end of the Ice Age. Meltzer's research team found that nearly...
  • North America's Oldest Skeleton Discovery: 13,000-Year-Old Body of 'Naia' Discovered in Mexico

    05/16/2014 3:41:26 AM PDT · by Candor7 · 14 replies
    International Business Times ^ | May 15, 2014 19:00 GMT | Lydia Smith
    One of the oldest human skeletons in North America has been discovered by a team of international scientists in an underwater Yucatn Peninsula cave............... ...................... The girl's skeleton is exceptionally complete because of the environment in which she died -- she ended up in the right water and in a quiet place without any soil. Her pristine preservation enabled our team to extract enough DNA to determine her shared genetic code with modern Native Americans," she added. The skeleton, which is now covered in water, is estimated to be between 12,000 and 13,000 years old, suggesting Naia lived in the...
  • Scientists reveal a first in Ice Age art

    06/21/2011 11:16:04 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 66 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | 06-21-2011 | Provided by Smithsonian
    Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Florida have announced the discovery of a bone fragment, approximately 13,000 years old, in Florida with an incised image of a mammoth or mastodon. This engraving is the oldest and only known example of Ice Age art to depict a proboscidean (the order of animals with trunks) in the Americas. The team's research is published online in the Journal of Archaeological Science. The bone was discovered in Vero Beach, Fla. by James Kennedy, an avocational fossil hunter, who collected the bone and later while cleaning the bone, discovered the engraving. Recognizing...
  • Old Vero Man Site History

    06/04/2012 6:29:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Old Vero Ice Age Sites Committee ^ | obtained Sunday, June 3rd, 2012 | unattributed
    In 1913 the Indian River Farms Company was dredging the Main Relief Canal in Vero Florida, in preparation to handle an expanding population. (It was not called Vero Beach until 1925.) The workers on this project kept seeing fossilized bones in the walls or banks of the freshly dredged canal. Some of these bones were presented to the state geologist, Dr E.H. Sellards. Dr. Sellards suggested that they also look for human bones during a visit to the site. In 1916 Dr Sellards, working with Frank Ayers, Isaac Wells, and others found more human bones in the strata known as...
  • University of Florida: Epic carving on fossil bone found in Vero Beach

    06/04/2009 8:15:37 AM PDT · by BGHater · 50 replies · 2,688+ views
    Vero Beach 32963 ^ | 04 June 2009 | SANDRA RAWLS
    In what a top Florida anthropologist is calling the oldest, most spectacular and rare work of art in the Americas, an amateur Vero Beach fossil hunter has found an ancient bone etched with a clear image of a walking mammoth or mastodon. According to leading experts from the University of Florida, the remarkable find demonstrates with new and startling certainty that humans coexisted with prehistoric animals more than 12,000 years ago in this fossil- rich region of the state. No similar carved figure has ever been authenticated in the United States, or anywhere in this hemisphere. The brown, mineral-hardened bone...
  • Smithsonian does not dispute authenticity of archaeological find in Vero Beach [13K old]

    10/26/2010 8:40:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Indian River County ^ | Wednesday, October 20, 2010 | Elliott Jones
    The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., has found no reason to dispute the authenticity of an one-of-a-kind archaeological discovery that might help confirm a human presence here up to 13,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age. In early 2009, local fossil collector James Kennedy cleaned off an old bone he found two years earlier and noticed some lines on it -- lines that turned out to be a clear etching of a walking mammoth with tusks. The location where he found it hasn't been disclosed, except that it came from an area north of Vero Beach....
  • First South Americans Ate Giant Sloths (30,000 years ago!)

    11/21/2013 4:11:30 AM PST · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 11-19-2013 | Jennifer Viegas
    Giant sloths were eaten by a population living in Uruguay 30,000 years ago, suggesting humans arrived in the Americas far earlier than previously thought, according to a new study. The discovery, along with other recent findings, strengthens the theory that people arrived in South America via ocean crossings long before humans might have walked into North America from northeastern Asia, during the end of the last glacial period around 16,000 years ago. The study was published in the latest Proceedings of the Royal Society B. These brave individuals apparently did not shy away from big game either, with giant sloth...
  • DNA study suggests hunting did not kill off mammoth

    09/11/2013 3:59:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 54 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9-10-2013 | Pallab Ghosh
    Researchers have found evidence to suggest that climate change, rather than humans, was the main factor that drove the woolly mammoth to extinction. A DNA analysis shows that the number of creatures began to decrease much earlier than previously thought as the world's climate changed. It also shows that there was a distinct population of mammoth in Europe that died out around 30,000 years ago. The results have published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The view many researchers had about woolly mammoths is that they were a hardy, abundant species that thrived during their time on the...
  • Scientists want to study Bulls Scarp, ocean-bottom archaeological site that was Ice Age coast

    07/15/2013 3:53:59 PM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Charleston Post & Courier (SC) ^ | 7-7-2013 | Bo Pertesen
    Bulls Scarp could be the most fascinating and important archaeological site waiting to be surveyed in the region. There’s just one little problem: That Ice Age rock ledge is under about 140 feet of seawater.But a team of scientists recently studied and mapped it from the ocean surface. Now the team is looking for partners to go back.“We haven’t been on the bottom to look for artifacts and that’s what we’re trying to do. We feel very strongly this area would have held populations of people,” said Scott Harris, College of Charleston geology professor.“I think it’s fantastic. I can just...
  • The quest is to clone a mammoth. The question is: should we do it?

    07/14/2013 8:08:58 AM PDT · by Renfield · 45 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 7-13-2013 | Robin McKie
    The idea would make headlines around the world and bring tears of joy to the planet's journalists. An adorable baby woolly mammoth, tottering on its newborn legs, is introduced to the media. Cloned from a few cells scraped from the permafrost of Siberia, the little creature provides the latest proof of the might of modern science and demonstrates the fact that extinction has at long last lost its sting. It is a fascinating prospect, one that was raised again last week when the most recently discovered carcass of a mammoth was revealed to the public in Yokohama, Japan. The female,...
  • Early Americans faced late Pliestocene climate change

    02/26/2006 3:50:38 PM PST · by redpoll · 19 replies · 906+ views
    Eureka Alert! ^ | Feb. 19, 2006 | no author
    Early Americans faced rapid late Pleistocene climate change and chaotic environments The environment encountered when the first people emigrated into the New World was variable and ever-changing, according to a Penn State geologist. "The New World was not a nice quiet place when humans came," says Dr. Russell Graham, associate professor of geology and director of the Earth & Mineral Sciences Museum. Archaeologists agree that by 11,000 years ago, people were spread across North and South America, but evidence is building for an earlier entry into the New World, a date that would put human population of North and South...
  • Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago)

    02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST · by blam · 71 replies · 5,365+ views
    Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
    Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization ancient Mesopotamia more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
  • Bush tucker feeds an ancient mystery

    07/13/2012 7:38:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    HeritageDaily ^ | Tuesday, July 10, 2012 | Contributing Source: UNSW
    As sabre tooth tigers and woolly mammoths were wandering around Europe, unique, giant prehistoric animals were living in Australia -- three metre tall kangaroos and wombat-like creatures, the size of a four-wheel drive, were just some of the curious creatures Down Under. Yet mysteriously, sometime during the last 100,000 years, they disappeared forever. The extinction of these giant animals, known as megafauna, has generated great debate. One group advocates "human blitzkrieg" -- those asserting the first Australians hunted these beasts to extinction. Others, myself included, find there is too little evidence to confidently attribute responsibility to any particular factor. Nonetheless,...
  • SubQuantum Kinetics, wide ranging unifying cosmology theory by Dr. Paul LaViolette

    08/22/2007 12:00:43 PM PDT · by Kevmo · 68 replies · 1,785+ views
    THE STARBURST FOUNDATION ^ | January 2007 | Dr. Paul LaViolette
    Predictions Part I astronomy and climatology http://home.earthlink.net/~gravitics/LaViolette/Predict.html Superwave Theory Predictions and their Subsequent Verification Galactic Core Explosions - prevailing concept (1980): At the time of this prediction, astronomers believed that the cores of galaxies, including our own, become active ("explode") about every 10 to 100 million years and stay active for about a million years. Since our own Galactic core presently appears quiescent, they believed it would likely remain inactive for many tens of millions of years. Although, in 1977, astronomer Jan Oort cited evidence that our Galactic core has been active within the past 10,000 years. Prediction No. 1...
  • Plasma, Solar Outbursts, and the End of the Last Ice Age

    07/15/2011 10:15:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 75 replies
    The Official Website thereof ^ | prior to July 15, 2011 | Dr. Robert M. Schoch
    15,000 to 11,000 years ago Earth experienced a series of climatic fluctuations... there was a short cold spell, known as the Younger Dryas, before the final warming and... end of the last ice age. Based on Greenland ice core data, the Younger Dryas began... 10,900 B.C., and its ending... circa 9700 B.C. and may have occurred within an incredible three years... I once hypothesized that comets were responsible. A comet hitting the land or a shallow ocean, or exploding above the land's surface, scattering dust and debris into the atmosphere, would cause global cooling... This pattern fits well with the...
  • The Intriguing Problem Of The Younger DryasWhat Does It Mean And What Caused It?

    06/21/2012 10:11:38 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 45 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 19, 2012 | Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook
    This is a follow up posting to Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!Guest post by Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University.The Younger Dryas was a period of rapid cooling in the late Pleistocene 12,800 to 11,500 calendar years ago. It followed closely on the heels of a dramatically abrupt warming that brought the last Ice Age to a close (17,500 calendar years ago), lasted for about 1,300 years, then ended as abruptly as it started. The cause of these remarkably sudden climate changes has puzzled geologists and climatologists for decades and despite much effort to find...
  • Reindeer Herder Finds Baby Mammoth in Russia Arctic

    08/19/2011 5:44:20 PM PDT · by FrogMom · 78 replies
    Reuters ^ | Aug 19, 2011 | Alissa de Carbonnel
    A reindeer herder in Russia's Arctic has stumbled on the pre-historic remains of a baby woolly mammoth poking out of the permafrost, local officials said on Friday.
  • Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times

    07/24/2006 12:03:03 AM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 276 replies · 7,633+ views
    Mammoth Trumpet ^ | March 2001 | Firestone/Topping
    Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times by Richard B. Firestone & William Topping The Paleoindian occupation of North America, theoretically the point of entry of the first people to the Americas, is traditionally assumed to have occurred within a short time span beginning at about 12,000 yr B.P. This is inconsistent with much older South American dates of around 32,000 yr B.P.1 and the similarity of the Paleoindian toolkit to Mousterian traditions that disappeared about 30,000 years ago.2. A pattern of unusually young radiocarbon dates in the Northeast has been noted by Bonnichsen and Will.3,4 Our research...
  • Ice Age coming into Focus!

    06/05/2004 2:32:35 PM PDT · by cureforcancer · 21 replies · 694+ views
    The Neutrino Report ^ | 1995, 2004 | Robert Texas Bailey(Tex)
    In 1990 they found that the Earth goes through abrupt temperature changes from deep ice samples in Greenland of about 10,000 years ago the Earths temperature dropped 19 degrees (research found by weather channel) taking 5-10 years (weather channel) but from analytical data, I intend to show this could take for the most part one year (Robert T Bailey) and more shocking a large part of the temperature change will happen this year! The End of the World as we known it is coming; an ice Age will change the face of the Earth. We have a crisis here. In...
  • Evidence Aquits Clovis People Of Ancient Killings, Archaeologists Say

    02/25/2003 4:46:54 PM PST · by blam · 98 replies · 1,378+ views
    University Of Washington ^ | 2-25-2003 | Joel Schwartz
    Contact: Joel Schwarz joels@u.washington.edu 206-543-2580 University of Washington Evidence acquits Clovis people of ancient killings, archaeologists say Archaeologists have uncovered another piece of evidence that seems to exonerate some of the earliest humans in North America of charges of exterminating 35 genera of Pleistocene epoch mammals. The Clovis people, who roamed large portions of North America 10,800 to 11,500 years ago and left behind highly distinctive and deadly fluted spear points, have been implicated in the exterminations by some scientists. Now researchers from the University of Washington and Southern Methodist University who examined evidence from all suggested Clovis-age killing sites...
  • The Maunder Minimum and Climate Change: Have Historical Records Aided Current Research?

    04/14/2013 8:27:11 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies
    stsci.edu ^ | 1998 | John E. Beckman, and Terence J. Mahoney
    John E. Beckman, and Terence J. Mahoney Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain Abstract:We discuss how, in the 1970's, Eddy took clues from the historical researches of Sprer and Maunder in the 19th century to draw attention to the virtual absence of sunspot activity between 1645 and 1715. This ``Maunder Minimum'' is not only of interest to solar physicists in the context of the theory of solar magnetic activity, and to stellar astrophysicists working on the properties of cool stars, but may also be a vital clue to the influence of the variability of the Sun's...
  • 'Quiet Sun' baffling astronomers [SUN SPOTS HAVE DISAPPEARED]

    04/21/2009 10:28:59 AM PDT · by KayEyeDoubleDee · 136 replies · 4,869+ views
    BBC News ^ | 2009/04/21 05:04:15 GMT | Pallab Ghosh
    Sunspots could be seen by the Soho telescope in 2001 (l), but not this year (r) There are no sunspots, very few solar flares - and our nearest star is the quietest it has been for a very long time. The observations are baffling astronomers, who are due to study new pictures of the Sun, taken from space, at the UK National Astronomy Meeting. The Sun normally undergoes an 11-year cycle of activity. At its peak, it has a tumultuous boiling atmosphere that spits out flares and planet-sized chunks of super-hot gas. This is followed by a calmer period. Last...
  • 17th Century Solar Oddity Believed Linked To Global Cooling Is Rare Among Nearby Stars

    06/03/2004 7:30:42 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 285+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 6-3-2004 | UC Berkeley
    Source: University Of California - Berkeley Date: 2004-06-03 17th Century Solar Oddity Believed Linked To Global Cooling Is Rare Among Nearby Stars Berkeley - A mysterious 17th century solar funk that some have linked to Europe's Little Ice Age and to global climate change, becomes even more of an enigma as a result of new observations by University of California, Berkeley, astronomers. For 70 years, from 1645 until 1714, early astronomers reported almost no sunspot activity. The number of sunspots - cooler areas on the sun that appear dark against the brighter surroundings - dropped a thousandfold, according to some...
  • Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

    01/02/2009 6:02:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 35 replies · 2,014+ views
    Scientific American ^ | January 2, 2009 | David Biello
    Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigatedRoughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary...
  • Ice Cores Unlock Climate Secrets

    06/09/2004 3:27:33 PM PDT · by blam · 76 replies · 487+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-9-2004 | Julianna Kettlewell
    Ice cores unlock climate secrets By Julianna Kettlewell BBC News Online science staff Tiny bubbles of ancient air are locked in the ice Global climate patterns stretching back 740,000 years have been confirmed by a three kilometre long ice core drilled from the Antarctic, Nature reports. Analysis of the ice proves our planet has had eight Ice Ages during that period, punctuated by rather brief warm spells - one of which we enjoy today. If past patterns are followed in the future, we can expect our "mild snap" to last another 15,000 years. The data may also help predict how...
  • North Pole had sub-tropical seas because of global warming

    09/07/2004 8:35:06 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 42 replies · 1,256+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 9/7/04 | AFP - Paris
    PARIS (AFP) - The North Pole once had a balmy, sub-tropical sea because of extreme global warming, according to European scientists who have carried out the world's deepest drilling into ancient sediment on the far northern seabed. Cores retrieved from up to 430 metres (1,397 feet) below the seafloor in waters 1,300 metres (4,550 feet) deep show that, for a brief period which occurred around 55 million years ago, the Arctic Ocean was around 20 C (68 F), compared with today's typical average temperature of minus 1.5 C (29.3 F), they said on Tuesday. "It occurred during a period called...
  • The 'wobble' that wipes out life on Earth every 2.5m years

    10/11/2006 11:43:56 PM PDT · by MadIvan · 87 replies · 3,939+ views
    The Daily Mail ^ | October 12, 2006 | JULIE WHELDON
    If you are the kind of person who worries about the future, this might not make happy reading.Scientists have found that on average mammal species enjoy only 2.5 million years of life before being wiped out because of the Earth's "wobble." They say when the tilt and orbit reach key points it can spark dramatic global cooling - and the last time this happened was 2.6 million years ago. This suggests we are overdue a wave of extinction. However, before you panic, scientists say our planet has changed beyond all recognition in the last 3 million years. The new research...
  • Decipher

    07/25/2003 7:39:05 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 2 replies · 335+ views
    slashdot.org ^ | Friday July 25, @01:00PM | Javed Ikbal
    More Sci-Fi reading for your summer weekend: Javed Ikbal writes "Decipher by Stel Pavlou is a mind-blowing work of science fiction. If you thought Stephenson's Snowcrash did a great job of bringing myth and science together, bite into this. I am still shaking my head over the amount of research that must have gone into this book." Read on for Javed's review. Warning -- spoilers within. What it's about: Tag line: Mankind had 12,000 years to decipher the message. We have one week left ... Let me make something clear. Although this is my first Slashdot review, I do not...
  • Ohio's Ancient Nile, The Teays River

    05/27/2013 5:27:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Ohio Dep't of Natural Resources ^ | prior to 1/13/2009 | Jean Backs
    The formation of the Teays River took place about five million years ago during the Tertiary period of the Cenozoic era, after the age of the dinosaurs. Tucked away securely inland, and no longer buffeted by waves or crashing continents, the plains of Ohio and the craggy peaks of the nearby Appalachian Mountains were most profoundly impacted by the power of running water... the water flowed south to north, east to west until it found its ultimate outlet in the young Gulf of Mexico, which had lapped up over several southern states in a thick finger that traces todays Mississippi...
  • Evidence for deposition of 10 million tonnes of impact spherules across four continents 12,800 y ago

    05/23/2013 6:02:12 PM PDT · by Renfield · 17 replies
    National Academy of Sciences ^ | 5-17-2013 | James H. Wittke et al
    (Abstract only) Significance We present detailed geochemical and morphological analyses of nearly 700 spherules from 18 sites in support of a major cosmic impact at the onset of the Younger Dryas episode (12.8 ka). The impact distributed ∼10 million tonnes of melted spherules over 50 million square kilometers on four continents. Origins of the spherules by volcanism, anthropogenesis, authigenesis, lightning, and meteoritic ablation are rejected on geochemical and morphological grounds. The spherules closely resemble known impact materials derived from surficial sediments melted at temperatures >2,200 °C. The spherules correlate with abundances of associated melt-glass, nanodiamonds, carbon spherules, aciniform carbon, charcoal,...
  • Prehistoric rhino reveals secrets

    12/08/2012 2:19:44 PM PST · by Renfield · 34 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12-6-2012 | Matt Walker
    The preserved body of a woolly rhinoceros has revealed new insights into how this now extinct giant animal once lived. The woolly rhino was once one of the most abundant large mammals living in Eurasia, but only a handful of preserved carcasses have been found. Now an analysis of a female woolly rhino found preserved in Siberia reveals that the animal was a herbivore that grazed mainly on cereals, and was similar in size to today's Javan rhino. However, it was slow to reproduce, had a short stubby tail and ears, and was likely driven to extinction in part due...
  • Boy discovers almost complete woolly mammoth carcass

    10/04/2012 12:47:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10-4-2012 | Joanna Carver
    An 11-year-old Russian boy stumbled across the 30,000-year-old remains of a woolly mammoth, an experience that was surely either incredibly exciting or permanently traumatising. According to the Moscow News, Yevgeny Salinder found the 500-kilogram beast in the tundra of the Taymyr peninsula in northern Russia. Scientists laboured for a week with axes and steam to dig it out of the permafrost it's been encased in for centuries. Woolly mammoths have been found in the permafrost in Siberia since at least 1929, but this is one of the best preserved. Its tusks, mouth and rib cage are clearly visible....
  • Did a Pacific Ocean meteor trigger the Ice Age?

    09/20/2012 5:02:02 AM PDT · by Renfield · 35 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 9-19-2012
    (Phys.org)When a huge meteor collided with Earth about 2.5 million years ago in the southern Pacific Ocean it not only likely generated a massive tsunami but also may have plunged the world into the Ice Ages, a new study suggests. A team of Australian researchers says that because the Eltanin meteor which was up to two kilometres across - crashed into deep water, most scientists have not adequately considered either its potential for immediate catastrophic impacts on coastlines around the Pacific rim or its capacity to destabilise the entire planet's climate system. "This is the only known deep-ocean impact...
  • DNA frozen in permafrost muck reveals ancient ecosystems

    11/21/2011 6:15:14 PM PST · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Montreal Gazette ^ | November 19, 2011 | Ed Struzik
    EDMONTON University of Alberta scientist Duane Froese was on sabbatical last summer when he received a call from a Yukon miner who wanted to give him the heads-up about a site he planned to excavate. Like most Klondike miners, Tony Beets is a character. Hes tall, bushy-haired, drives fast and uses colourful language. But hed also been incredibly helpful over the years, moving in heavy equipment for scientists such as Froese, exposing layers of ancient permafrost that yielded the frozen bones of woolly mammoths, scimitar cats, short-faced bears and other animals that lived in this part of the world...
  • Comet Theory Comes Crashing to Earth

    05/23/2011 5:43:19 PM PDT · by Renfield · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Miller-McCune ^ | 5-14-2011 | Rex Dalton
    It seemed like such an elegant answer to an age-old mystery: the disappearance of what are arguably North Americas first people. A speeding comet nearly 13,000 years ago was the culprit, the theory goes, spraying ice and rocks across the continent, killing the Clovis people and the mammoths they fed on, and plunging the region into a deep chill. The idea so captivated the public that three movies describing the catastrophe were produced. But now, four years after the purportedly supportive evidence was reported, a host of scientific authorities systematically have made the case that the comet theory is bogus....
  • Petition seeks wolf reintroduction across country

    07/20/2010 1:53:52 PM PDT · by george76 · 71 replies · 2+ views
    ap ^ | July 20, 2010 | MATTHEW BROWN
    Tens of thousands of gray wolves would be returned to the woods of New England, the mountains of California, the wide open Great Plains and the desert West under a scientific petition now before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Arizona-based Center for Biological Diversity say ...
  • Major cache of fossils unearthed in L.A.

    02/17/2009 10:55:33 PM PST · by smokingfrog · 45 replies · 1,668+ views
    latimes ^ | Feb. 17, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
    Workers excavating an underground garage on the site of an old May Co. parking structure in Los Angeles' Hancock Park got more than just a couple hundred new parking spaces. They found the largest known cache of fossils from the last ice age, an assemblage that has flabbergasted paleontologists. Researchers from the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea tar pits have barely begun extracting the fossils from the sandy, tarry matrix of soil, but they expect the find to double the size of the museum's collection from the period, already the largest in the world. Among their finds,...
  • Cloned Mammoths Made More Likely by Frozen Mice

    11/07/2008 4:00:13 AM PST · by Renfield · 6 replies · 514+ views
    Fox News ^ | 11-05-08
    Jurassic Park? Still not close to being real. But cloned woolly mammoths just became more possible, thanks to Japanese researchers who announced Monday that they'd cloned dead mice that had been frozen for 16 years. When animal tissue freezes, cell walls burst and the DNA inside the cell nuclei can be seriously damaged. Because of that, most scientists had assumed it'd be impossible to get any good DNA from the thousands of frozen mammoths thought to still lie in Siberian permafrost. The Japanese team figured, however, that the high concentration of sugar in brain tissue might preserve DNA. So they...
  • Late Pleostocene Human Population Bottlenecks. . . (Toba)

    12/16/2005 11:33:44 AM PST · by blam · 102 replies · 6,911+ views
    The Bradshaw Foundation ^ | 1998 | Stanley H. Ambrose
    Professor Stanley H. Ambrose Department of Anthropology, University Of Illinois, Urbana, USA Extract from "Journey of Human Evolution" [1998] 34, 623-651 The last glacial period was preceded by 1000 years of the coldest temperatures of the Late Pleistocene, apparently caused by the eruption of the Mount Toba volcano. The six year long volcanic winter and 1000-year-long instant Ice Age that followed Mount Toba's eruption may have decimated Modern Man's entire population. Genetic evidence suggests that Human population size fell to about 10,000 adults between 50 and 100 thousand years ago. The survivors from this global catastrophy would have found refuge...
  • Great beasts peppered from space

    12/12/2007 9:55:00 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies · 531+ views
    BBC News ^ | 12-11-07
    Startling evidence has been found which shows mammoth and other great beasts from the last ice age were blasted with material that came from space.Eight tusks dating to some 35,000 years ago all show signs of having being peppered with meteorite fragments. The ancient remains come from Alaska, but researchers also have a Siberian bison skull with the same pockmarks. The scientists released details of the discovery at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, US. They painted a picture of a calamitous event over North America that may have severely knocked back the populations of some...
  • Sabretooth's surprising weak bite

    10/05/2007 7:34:36 AM PDT · by Renfield · 5 replies · 169+ views
    BBC News ^ | 10-02-07
    The sabretooth tiger may have looked a fearsome sight with its massive canines but its reputation takes something of a knock with a new piece of research. Scientists who have studied the extinct creature's skull in detail say it had a relatively weak bite - compared with, say, a modern lion. And although those fangs must have been amazing killing implements, they made for a very restricted hunting strategy.....
  • North Oregon Coast Beach Reveals Ancient Ghost Forest Again

    05/29/2007 3:32:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 50 replies · 2,544+ views
    Beach Connection ^ | 5/28/07 | Unknown
    <p>Arch Cape, Oregon) The mysterious chunks of wood have shown up periodically over the last few decades, sticking out of the sand like doomed creatures trying to make their last, desperate escape from a dreadful fate beneath the rest of the world. They make momentary impressions on passersby, who have no clue to the real meaning of these muted witnesses to an age practically before Mankind. They are unintentional memorials to the grandiose forest that once stood here, now reduced to twisted, tortured shapes that scream silently from another epoch.</p>
  • DNA Analysis Reveals Rapid Population Shift Among Pleistocene Cave Bears

    02/20/2007 12:08:06 PM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 522+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 2-19-2007 | Erin Doonan
    Public release date: 19-Feb-2007 Contact: Erin Doonan edoonan@cell.com 617-397-2802 Cell Press DNA analysis reveals rapid population shift among Pleistocene cave bears Studying DNA obtained from teeth of ancient cave bears, researchers have been able to identify a shift in a particular population of the bears inhabiting a European valley in the late Pleistocene era. The findings illustrate the ability of DNA sequence analysis to reveal aspects of animal population dynamics in the distant past and potentially illuminate the influence of human migrations in animal population changes. The new work, reported by a collaborative group of researchers including Michael Hofreiter of...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/14/2006 9:17:59 PM PDT · by peyton randolph · 129 replies · 3,440+ views
    Times Online (U.K.) ^ | 08/15/2006 | Mark Henderson
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out...
  • Pleistocene Park? On the reintroduction of species

    08/20/2005 2:15:44 PM PDT · by sociotard · 30 replies · 796+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 17 August 2005 | Kurt Kleiner
    Sorry if this is a repost. Elephants and lions unleashed on North America? 18:00 17 August 2005 NewScientist.com news service Kurt Kleiner Elephants, lions, cheetahs and camels could one day roam the western US under a proposal to recreate North American landscapes as they existed more than 13,000 years ago, when humans first encountered them. The plan, proposed in a commentary in Nature and co-authored by 13 ecologists and conservation biologists, would help enrich a North American ecosystem that was left almost devoid of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene period. It would also help preserve wildlife that...
  • Ice age bacteria brought back to life

    02/25/2005 12:57:59 PM PST · by aimhigh · 108 replies · 2,309+ views
    www.NewScientist.com ^ | 2/25/2005 | Kelly Young
    A bacterium that sat dormant in a frozen pond in Alaska for 32,000 years has been revived by NASA scientists. Once scientists thawed the ice, the previously undiscovered bacteria started swimming around on the microscope slide. The researchers say it is the first new species of microbe found alive in ancient ice. Now named Carnobacterium pleistocenium, it is thought to have lived in the Pleistocene epoch, a time when woolly mammoths still roamed the Earth. NASA astrobiologist Richard Hoover, who led the team, said the find bolsters the case for finding life elsewhere in the universe, particularly given this week's...
  • Uncovering Ice Age Archaeology In Jordan

    08/24/2004 8:05:50 AM PDT · by blam · 11 replies · 506+ views
    Daily Star ^ | 8-24-2004 | Staff
    Uncovering Ice Age archaeology in JordanEarly humans hunted large game near now-vanished lakes By Daily Star Staff Tuesday, August 24, 2004 AMMAN: The early prehistory and archaeology of the Middle Pleistocene, or Ice Age, is being revealed in remarkable detail in studies in southern Jordan. The work, begun in the late 1990s, has documented the presence of Homo erectus, our ancient ancestor, at a series of archaeological sites at Ayoun Qedim in the al-Jafr Basin. Today al-Jafr Basin is one of the most arid places in the Middle East. During the Pleistocene, the basin was filled with an enormous freshwater...