Keyword: poleshift

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  • Is the Sun DISINTEGRATING? NASA spots monster hole open up on our star

    05/26/2016 5:48:32 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 84 replies
    Express UK ^ | 5/26/16 | Jon Austin
    NASA has revealed that a massive hole, measuring more than ten per cent of the Sun's surface area, has opened up on our star. ... NASA says the huge hole is actually not of great concern, but it remains unclear why the coronal holes actually form. ..
  • Pole flips tied to plate tectonics

    11/26/2011 8:27:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Science News ^ | November 19th, 2011 | Alexandra Witze
    Assumed to be caused by random fluctuations in the circulation of the molten iron core, the flips may actually be tied to what's going on at Earth's surface. At times in the geologic past when landmasses have bunched together on one side of the equator, the Earth's magnetic field has begun flipping soon thereafter... "What we see clearly is that the surface positions of the continents are linked with the frequency of the reversals," says group member François Pétrélis, a geophysicist at the French research agency CNRS in Paris... Computer simulations have shown how molten iron in the spinning core...
  • Explosive volcanoes ended Earth's time as a snowball: Huge eruptions broke our planet's deep freeze

    01/18/2016 9:00:01 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 01/18/2016 | Ryan O'Hare for
    In our planet's early history, 720 to 640 million years ago, thick sheets of ice covered the majority of the surface, as the Earth was locked in a deep freeze. But explosive underwater volcanoes changed the chemistry of the Earth's oceans and were key to breaking the planet from its icy state, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Southampton believe underwater volcanoes helped to thaw out "Snowball Earth", and even led to runaway chemical chain reactions, which created the conditions for an explosion of life on Earth. While much of the driving forces behind glaciation during...
  • Earth’s magnetic poles won’t flip any time soon

    11/27/2015 7:34:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    pulseheadlines.com ^ | By Maria Jose Inojosa
    Why should be we worried about a polarity flip? The magnetic field protects us from harmful solar radiations and cosmic rays. If these start fading away, it may affect every living creature on Earth. An increase in radiation exposure may not only lead to serious health outcomes, but also some genetic disorders could occur. Some biologists even fear that direct exposure to harmful solar radiations may result in mass extinctions. Not only could some severe health consequence fallow the weakening of magnetic field. In a less concerning outcome, but still very worrisome it could lead to a severe disturbance in...
  • Earth's inner core was formed 1-1.5 billion years ago

    10/11/2015 12:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 38 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/7/2015 | University of Liverpool
    There have been many estimates for when the earth's inner core was formed, but scientists from the University of Liverpool have used new data which indicates that the Earth's inner core was formed 1 -- 1.5 billion years ago as it "froze" from the surrounding molten iron outer core. . . . . In a new study published in Nature, researchers from the University's School of Environmental Sciences analysed magnetic records from ancient igneous rocks and found that there was a sharp increase in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field between 1 and 1.5 billion years ago. This increased...
  • Ice age polarity reversal was global event:

    04/06/2015 5:26:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 67 replies
    scienceheathen.com ^ | October 16, 2012 | Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
    Ice Age Magnetic Reversal Was Global Event And Linked With Super Volcano Eruption And Rapid Climate Variability, Says New Research October 17, 2012 in Geology & Climate During the last ice age, around 41,000 years ago, there was a very rapid and complete reversal of the Earth’s geomagnetic field, according to new research. There was already localized evidence of polarity reversals during this time, but with the new research, the theory that it was a global event is now strongly supported. And very interestingly, it is one that nearly coincided with the very fast, short-term climate variability of the last...
  • Frustrated magnets - Hall Effect clues to their discontent

    04/03/2015 5:40:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    An experiment conducted has revealed an unlikely behavior in a class of materials called frustrated magnets, addressing a long-debated question about the nature of these discontented quantum materials. The researchers tested the frustrated magnets -- so-named because they should be magnetic at low temperatures but aren't -- to see if they exhibit a behavior called the Hall Effect. When a magnetic field is applied to an electric current flowing in a conductor such as a copper ribbon, the current deflects to one side of the ribbon. This deflection, first observed in 1879 by E.H. Hall, is used today in sensors...
  • NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Spacecraft ... to study Earth’s Magnetic Reconnection Events

    02/28/2015 9:07:27 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Ken Kremer
    “Magnetic reconnection is one of the most important drivers of space weather events,” said Jeff Newmark, interim director of the Heliophysics Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Eruptive solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and geomagnetic storms all involve the release, through reconnection, of energy stored in magnetic fields. Space weather events can affect modern technological systems such as communications networks, GPS navigation, and electrical power grids.” The four MMS have been stacked on top of one another like pancakes, encapsulated in the payload fairing, transported to the launch pad, hoisted and mated to the top of the 195-foot-tall rocket.
  • Heart of Earth's inner core revealed

    02/10/2015 12:54:42 AM PST · by moose07 · 38 replies
    BBC ^ | 10 February 2015 | Rebecca Morelle
    Scientists say they have gained new insight into what lies at the very centre of the Earth. Research from China and the US suggests that the innermost core of our planet has another, distinct region at its centre. The team believes that the structure of the iron crystals there are different from those found in the outer part of the inner core. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Geoscience. Without being able to drill into the heart of the Earth, its make-up is something of a mystery. So instead, scientists use echoes generated by earthquakes to study...
  • Earth's Magnetic Field Could Flip in Our Lifetime

    10/18/2014 7:44:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    livescience.com ^ | October 17, 2014 01:20pm ET | Kelly Dickerson,
    A magnetic field shift is old news. Around 800,000 years ago, magnetic north hovered over Antarctica and reindeer lived in magnetic south. The poles have flipped several times throughout Earth's history. Scientists have estimated that a flip cycle starts with the magnetic field weakening over the span of a few thousand years, then the poles flip and the field springs back up to full strength again. However, a new study shows that the last time the Earth's poles flipped, it only took 100 years for the reversal to happen. The Earth's magnetic field is in a weakening stage right now....
  • Earth's Inner Fort Knox [Earth's core has 1.6 quadrillion tons of gold]

    12/13/2006 10:58:55 PM PST · by grundle · 56 replies · 1,851+ views
    Discover magazine ^ | September 2006 | Anne Wootton
    Searching for a pot of gold? Try the center of the Earth. More than 99 percent of Earth's gold is missing—it all sank to the center of the planet billions of years ago. In fact, says geologist Bernard Wood of Macquarie University in Australia, there's enough gold in Earth's core to coat its surface in 1.5 feet of the stuff. How did it get there? Earth formed from a series of smaller planetesimals that crashed together over the course of 30 million to 40 million years. Wood deduced how much gold ought to be present in Earth's crust by comparing...
  • The Sun: A Great Ball of Iron?

    07/17/2002 11:33:32 PM PDT · by per loin · 66 replies · 680+ views
    Science Daily
    Source:   University Of Missouri-Rolla (http://www.umr.edu) Date:   Posted 7/17/2002 The Sun: A Great Ball Of Iron? For years, scientists have assumed that the sun is an enormous mass of hydrogen. But in a paper presented before the American Astronomical Society, Dr. Oliver Manuel, a professor of nuclear chemistry at UMR, says iron, not hydrogen, is the sun's most abundant element. Manuel claims that hydrogen fusion creates some of the sun's heat, as hydrogen -- the lightest of all elements -- moves to the sun's surface. But most of the heat comes from the core of an exploded supernova...
  • Primordial Nukes (Prehistoric Nukes Found)

    03/14/2005 5:37:24 PM PST · by blam · 17 replies · 1,548+ views
    Science News Magazine ^ | 3-14-2005 | Peter Weiss
    Primordial NukesThe 2-billion-year-old tale of Earth's natural nuclear reactors Peter Weiss For more than a decade, Alexander P. Meshik has kept close tabs on a fleck of black rock no larger than an infant's fingernail. It's so unassuming that most people would sweep it into a dustpan without a second thought. Yet to Meshik, a nuclear physicist originally from Russia, this little scrap of mineral is a scientific gem. E. Roell The fleck, with its clues to believe-it-or-not geophysical events, emerged from the bowels of Earth decades ago. It was unearthed in the early 1970s at the Oklo uranium mine...
  • Will Compasses Point South?

    07/13/2004 7:25:26 AM PDT · by Servant of the 9 · 92 replies · 1,714+ views
    New York Times ^ | July 13, 2004 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    The collapse of the Earth's magnetic field, which both guards the planet and guides many of its creatures, appears to have started in earnest about 150 years ago. The field's strength has waned 10 to 15 percent, and the deterioration has accelerated of late, increasing debate over whether it portends a reversal of the lines of magnetic force that normally envelop the Earth. During a reversal, the main field weakens, almost vanishes, then reappears with opposite polarity. Afterward, compass needles that normally point north would point south, and during the thousands of years of transition, much in the heavens and...
  • Earthquakes and Tsunamis are triggered by Star-quakes

    03/06/2005 11:09:03 PM PST · by bd476 · 131 replies · 1,924+ views
    India Daily News ^ | March 7, 2005
    Earthquakes and Tsunamis are triggered by Star-quakes – the invisible interconnection between different parts of the Universe The position of SGR1806-20 in a radio image of the sky - 50,000 light-years away Staff Reporter Mar. 7, 2005 Computer models are showing an interesting relationship between star-quakes and earthquakes. Supernova, star-quakes and similar burst of energy in the Universe triggers earthquakes and tsunamis. According to researchers, most of the large earthquakes and Tsunamis happened when there was a burst of energy somewhere in the cosmos. According to BBC, Astronomers say they have been stunned by the amount of energy released in...
  • The earth's magnetic field impacts climate: Danish study

    01/12/2009 6:33:01 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 70 replies · 3,275+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 1/12/09 | AFP
    COPENHAGEN (AFP) – The earth's climate has been significantly affected by the planet's magnetic field, according to a Danish study published Monday that could challenge the notion that human emissions are responsible for global warming. "Our results show a strong correlation between the strength of the earth's magnetic field and the amount of precipitation in the tropics," one of the two Danish geophysicists behind the study, Mads Faurschou Knudsen of the geology department at Aarhus University in western Denmark, told the Videnskab journal. He and his colleague Peter Riisager, of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), compared a...
  • The earth's magnetic field impacts climate: Danish study

    01/15/2009 9:01:24 AM PST · by TaraP · 7 replies · 351+ views
    Terra Daily. ^ | Jan 12th, 2009
    The earth's climate has been significantly affected by the planet's magnetic field, according to a Danish study published Monday that could challenge the notion that human emissions are responsible for global warming. "Our results show a strong correlation between the strength of the earth's magnetic field and the amount of precipitation in the tropics," one of the two Danish geophysicists behind the study, Mads Faurschou Knudsen of the geology department at Aarhus University in western Denmark, told the Videnskab journal. He and his colleague Peter Riisager, of the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), compared a reconstruction of the...
  • Earth's magnetic field 'boosts gravity'

    09/23/2002 11:11:32 AM PDT · by VadeRetro · 134 replies · 1,680+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 09:20 22 September 02 | Michael Brooks
    Exclusive from New Scientist Hidden extra dimensions are causing measurements of the strength of gravity at different locations on Earth to be affected by the planet's magnetic field, French researchers say. This is a controversial claim because no one has ever provided experimental evidence to support either the existence of extra dimensions or any interaction between gravity and electromagnetism. But lab measurements of Newton's gravitational constant G suggest that both are real. Newton's constant, which describes the strength of the gravitational pull that bodies exert on each other, is the most poorly determined of the constants of nature. The two...
  • Magnetic effects seen in water

    12/07/2004 2:12:48 PM PST · by rotstan · 13 replies · 724+ views
    Physics Web News ^ | 12/6/04 | Staff
    Physicists in Japan have discovered that the melting point of water increases slightly in a strong magnetic field. Hideaki Inaba and colleagues at Chiba University found that it increases by 5.6 millikelvin for ordinary water in a field of 6 Tesla, and by 21.8 millikelvin for heavy water (J. Appl. Phys. 96 6127). Water has many unusual properties: it has relatively high melting and boiling points for a small molecule, and the liquid state can also be denser than the solid state. These properties are thought to arise from the 3D network of hydrogen bonds in the molecule. Recently, it...
  • Magnetic Stars

    10/15/2004 8:29:46 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 8 replies · 525+ views
    eurekalert/Nature/Max-Planck-Gesellschaft ^ | October 14th, 2004 | J. Braithwaite and H.C. Spruit
    Magnetic Stars The puzzle of `magnetic stars' solved by astrophysicists of the Max Planck Society How does one explain the enormous magnetic field strengths of the so-called `magnetic stars'? This question concerning magnetic fields in the cosmos, first posed half a century ago, has now been answered by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching. With 3-dimensional numerical simulations they have found the magnetic field configurations that underly the strong magnetic fields observed on the surface of the so-called magnetic A-stars and magnetic White Dwarfs, and how these fields can survive for the life time of these...