Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $19,918
22%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 22% is IN!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: prehistory

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Did Oil Kill The Dinosaurs?

    07/19/2016 3:00:57 PM PDT · by bananaman22 · 53 replies
    Oilprice.com ^ | 19-07-2016 | Dino
    What killed the dinosaurs? Its a question as old as well the dinosaurs themselves, and one that everyone from school children to scientists have been asking for decades. Movies like Jurassic Park and the Land Before Time only heighten that sense of wonder and raise the stakes behind that question. Now according to a new scientific study, it seems that black gold may have been the source of the dinos demise. Japanese researchers at Tohuku University and the Meteorological Research Institute authored a recent study in the research journal Scientific Reports suggesting that a meteor impact 66 million years...
  • Remarkable Discovery Could Push Back Human Agriculture by 11,000 Years

    09/15/2015 12:38:16 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 19 replies
    io9 ^ | 7/24/15 12:40pm | George Dvorsky
    Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered evidence of early cereal cultivation at a 23,000-year-old site in Galilee, effectively doubling the timespan humans are believed to have practiced farming.
  • Potential Origins of Europeans Found

    11/11/2005 1:09:32 AM PST · by AlaskaErik · 109 replies · 3,276+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | November 10, 2005 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
    A study of DNA from ancient farmers in Europe shows sharp differences from that of modern Europeans results that are likely to add fuel to the debate over European origins. Researchers led by Wolfgang Haak of Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, argue that their finding supports the belief that modern residents of central Europe descended from Stone Age hunter-gatherers who were present 40,000 years ago, and not the early farmers who arrived thousands of years later. But other anthropologists questioned that conclusion, arguing that the available information isn't sufficient to support it. Haak's team used DNA from 24...
  • Stone age axe found with wood handle

    11/27/2014 4:00:56 AM PST · by Natufian · 34 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/25/2014 | N/A
    Archaeologists in Denmark have uncovered an incredibly rare find: a stone age axe held within its wooden handle. The 5,500-year-old Neolithic axe was found during archaeological surveys ahead of a multi-billion euro tunnel project. The axe seems to have been jammed into what was once the seabed, perhaps as part of a ritual offering. The lack of oxygen in the clay ground helped preserve the wooden handle.
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:17:18 AM PDT · by Natufian · 28 replies
    BBC ^ | 09/17/2014 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans.
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs a breed twice the size of bulls predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Natural Selection Led To Different Features In Europeans As Recent As 5,000 Years Ago, Researchers

    04/06/2014 1:09:07 PM PDT · by blam · 13 replies
    Bio News - Tx ^ | 3-13-2014 | Mike Nace
    Natural Selection Led To Different Features In Europeans As Recent As 5,000 Years Ago, According To Researchers Posted by: Mike Nace March 13, 2014 An increasing volume of archaeological research and effort has come to focus particularly on the genetic evolution and development of human beings since the last Ice Age. While the last glacial period ended about 10,000 years ago, promising, new research suggests that substantial evolution of the human species can now be evidenced even in peoples from as recently as 5,000 years ago a relative blink of an eye in geological terms thanks to cutting-edge...
  • The worlds first detailed prehistoric maps of Britain

    12/19/2013 5:05:23 PM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 12-8-2013 | TANN
    The ABC Publishing Group has announced the publication of the world’s first prehistoric maps of Britain. These maps are based on the recently published book by Robert John Langdon titled ‘The Stonehenge Enigma’ which proves that Britain suffered massive ‘Post Glacial Flooding’ directly after the last Ice Age ten thousand years ago, and that mankind placed their ancient sites on the shorelines of these raised waterways. Stonehenge - surrounded by water on three sides[Credit: ABC Publishing Group] The maps are presented on the old ordnance survey first edition that shows the natural ancient environment to a higher degree of detail...
  • 'World's Oldest Temple' May Have Been Cosmopolitan Center

    03/17/2012 10:44:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, March 15, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    Gobekli Tepe is located in southern Turkey near the modern-day city of Urfa. It contains at least 20 stone rings (circles within a circle) that date back more than 11,000 years. T-shaped limestone blocks line the circles and reliefs are carved on them. Long ago, people would fill in the outer circle with debris before building a new circle within... Ancient blades made of volcanic rock that were discovered at what may be the world's oldest temple suggest that the site in Turkey was the hub of a pilgrimage that attracted a cosmopolitan group of people some 11,000 years ago....
  • Rewriting the dawn of civilization ( Was Gbekli Tepe the cradle of civilization? )

    01/03/2012 10:27:32 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 45 replies · 1+ views
    JoNova ^ | January 2nd, 2012 | Joanne
    If National Geographic had more stories like this one, I’d be inclined to subscribe. This is fascinating stuff.Seven thousand years before Stonehenge was Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, where you’ll find ring upon ring of T-shaped stone towers arranged  in a circle. Around 11,600 B.C. hundreds of people gathered on this mound, year after year, possibly for centuries.There are plenty of mysteries on this hill.  Some of the rocks weigh 16 tons, but archaeologists can find no homes, no hearths, no water source, and no sign of a town or village to support the hundreds of workers who built the rings...
  • Archaeologist argues world's oldest temples were not temples at all

    10/07/2011 2:07:06 PM PDT · by decimon · 26 replies
    University of Chicago Press Journals ^ | October 6, 2011 | Unknown
    Ancient structures uncovered in Turkey and thought to be the world's oldest temples may not have been strictly religious buildings after all, according to an article in the October issue of Current Anthropology. Archaeologist Ted Banning of the University of Toronto argues that the buildings found at Göbekli Tepe may have been houses for people, not...gods. The buildings at Göbekli, a hilltop just outside of the Turkish city of Urfa, were found in 1995 by Klaus Schmidt of the German Archaeological Institute and colleagues from the Şanlıurfa Museum in Turkey. The oldest of the structures at the site are immense...
  • Gbekli Tepe - The Birth of Religion

    05/23/2011 8:23:10 AM PDT · by No One Special · 27 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | June 2011 | Charles C. Mann
    We used to think agriculture gave rise to cities and later to writing, art, and religion. Now the world’s oldest temple suggests the urge to worship sparked civilization. Every now and then the dawn of civilization is reenacted on a remote hilltop in southern Turkey. The reenactors are busloads of tourists—usually Turkish, sometimes European. The buses (white, air-conditioned, equipped with televisions) blunder over the winding, indifferently paved road to the ridge and dock like dreadnoughts before a stone portal. Visitors flood out, fumbling with water bottles and MP3 players. Guides call out instructions and explanations. Paying no attention, the visitors...
  • 12,000 Years Old Unexplained Structure [Gobekli Tepe]

    04/18/2011 4:25:18 PM PDT · by stockpirate · 107 replies
    via UTUBE ^ | 2/10/2011 | HISTORY CHANNEL
    This site is 12,000 years old, the most advanced strutures ever found. Several video's on the link
  • History in the Remaking

    02/23/2010 8:21:35 AM PST · by Palter · 30 replies · 885+ views
    Newsweek ^ | 19 Feb 2010` | Patrick Symmes
    A temple complex in Turkey that predates even the pyramids is rewriting the story of human evolution. They call it potbelly hill, after the soft, round contour of this final lookout in southeastern Turkey. To the north are forested mountains. East of the hill lies the biblical plain of Harran, and to the south is the Syrian border, visible 20 miles away, pointing toward the ancient lands of Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent, the region that gave rise to human civilization. And under our feet, according to archeologist Klaus Schmidt, are the stones that mark the spotthe exact spotwhere humans...
  • Do These Mysterious Stones Mark The Site Of The Garden Of Eden?

    02/27/2009 9:47:03 PM PST · by Steelfish · 122 replies · 4,668+ views
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | February 27, 2009
    Do these mysterious stones mark the site of the Garden of Eden? By TOM COX For the old Kurdish shepherd, it was just another burning hot day in the rolling plains of eastern Turkey. Following his flock over the arid hillsides, he passed the single mulberry tree, which the locals regarded as 'sacred'. The bells on his sheep tinkled in the stillness. Then he spotted something. Crouching down, he brushed away the dust, and exposed a strange, large, oblong stone. The man looked left and right: there were similar stone rectangles, peeping from the sands. Calling his dog to heel,...
  • Stone Age Temple May Be Birthplace of Civilization

    11/14/2008 7:46:29 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 41 replies · 1,333+ views
    foxnews.com ^ | November 14, 2008
    It's more than twice as old as the Pyramids, or even the written word. When it was built, saber-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths still roamed, and the Ice Age had just ended. The elaborate temple at Gobelki Tepe in southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border, is staggeringly ancient: 11,500 years old, from a time just before humans learned to farm grains and domesticate animals. According to the German archaeologist in charge of excavations at the site, it might be the birthplace of agriculture, of organized religion of civilization itself.
  • Gobekli Tepe: The Worlds First Temple? ( massive carved stones about 11,000 years old )

    11/11/2008 5:08:14 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 86 replies · 3,696+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | November 2008 | # Andrew Curry # Photographs by Berthold Steinhilber
    Predating Stonehenge by 6,000 years, Turkey's stunning Gobekli Tepe upends the conventional view of the rise of civilization Six miles from Urfa, an ancient city in southeastern Turkey, Klaus Schmidt has made one of the most startling archaeological discoveries of our time: massive carved stones about 11,000 years old, crafted and arranged by prehistoric people who had not yet developed metal tools or even pottery. The megaliths predate Stonehenge by some 6,000 years. The place is called Gobekli Tepe, and Schmidt, a German archaeologist who has been working here more than a decade, is convinced it's the site of the...
  • Mysterious Neolithic People Made Optical Art

    09/25/2008 5:39:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 5,997+ views
    Discovery News ^ | September 22, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Running until the end of October at the Palazzo della Cancelleria in the Vatican, the exhibition, "Cucuteni-Trypillia: A Great Civilization of Old Europe," introduces a mysterious Neolithic people who are now believed to have forged Europe's first civilization... Archaeologists have named them "Cucuteni-Trypillians" after the villages of Cucuteni, near Lasi, Romania and Trypillia, near Kiev, Ukraine, where the first discoveries of this ancient civilization were made more than 100 years ago. The excavated treasures -- fired clay statuettes and op art-like pottery dating from 5000 to 3000 B.C. -- immediately posed a riddle to archaeologists... "Despite recent extensive excavations, no...
  • Turkish Site A Neolithic 'Supernova'

    04/21/2008 3:24:52 PM PDT · by blam · 21 replies · 193+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 4-21-2008 | Nicholas Birch
    Turkish site a Neolithic 'supernova' By Nicholas Birch April 21, 2008 Archaeologist Klaus Schmidt was among the first to realize the significance of the Gobekli Tepe site, which is 7,000 years older than Stonehenge. URFA, Turkey - As a child, Klaus Schmidt used to grub around in caves in his native Germany in the hope of finding prehistoric paintings. Thirty years later, as a member of the German Archaeological Institute, he found something infinitely more important: a temple complex almost twice as old as anything comparable. "This place is a supernova," said Mr. Schmidt, standing under a lone tree on...
  • A Journey To 9,000 Years Ago (atalhyk)

    01/17/2008 4:06:53 PM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 114+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | 1-17-2008 | VERCİHAN ZİFLİOĞLU
    A journey to 9,000 years ago Thursday, January 17, 2008VERCİHAN ZİFLİOĞLU ISTANBUL - Turkish Daily News Çatalhöyük Research Project Director Ian Hodder says goddess icons do not, contrary to assumptions, point to a matriarchal society in Çatalhöyük. Findings in Çatalhöyük show that men and women had equal social status. According to Hodder, who also has been following the Göbeklitepe excavations in Şanlıurfa, meticulous archaeological excavation in southeastern Anatolia can change all scientific archaeological assumptions Clues as to when mankind really began living in urban patterns lie in the Neolithic layers of Çatalhöyük. Çatalhöyük is within the borders of Cumra district...