Keyword: pseudointellectual

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  • We deserve better than Fox News

    We deserve better than Fox News I’ve gathered information for this column from two recent books: David Brock’s “The Fox Effect: How Roger Ailes Turned a Network into a Propaganda Machine” (2012) and Gabriel Sherman’s “The Loudest Voice in the Room,” (2014). Both books deserve serious attention, if only to refute. If you watch Fox News, you owe it to yourself to understand its history and outlook. If you find Fox News unbalanced and unfair, both books offer powerful support. Thinking Americans — whether liberal or conservative — have every reason to feel deeply, constantly, seriously dissatisfied. Consider: (1) Watching...
  • Pseudoconservatism - The Zot That Endures

    08/07/2010 3:32:59 PM PDT · by fifthcolumnist · 70 replies
    p m carpenter's commentary ^ | 8/6/10 | P.M. Carpenter
    Genuine conservatives would have restrained, as best they could, Democratic proposals to cure what ails us, for genuine conservatives are of course genuinely wary of too much change, too fast. But they would not have made a political game of uniform obstructionism; they would not have toyed with, of all things, unemployment benefits; and they most decidedly would not be advocating trillions in extended tax cuts while in the grips of such looming debt.
  • Equal, But… (how do children of homosexual "couples" do?)

    06/14/2010 8:31:11 AM PDT · by markomalley · 32 replies · 1,038+ views
    Catholic Exchange ^ | 6/14/2010 | Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse
    “Kids Do as Well with Same Sex Parents,” the headlines screamed. I crossed swords with Judith Stacey, one of the authors of this most recent study, at a debate at Bowling Green State a few years ago. I asked her point blank if she believed men and women were completely interchangeable as parents. In front of that very friendly audience, she said absolutely: the gender of parents doesn’t matter. And so she says now, in this new article the media loved. But midway through the article, her argument shifts from a “no difference” argument to my favorite definition of feminism:...
  • But He Was the Harvard Law Review Editor!

    02/08/2010 3:46:51 AM PST · by Scanian · 40 replies · 1,731+ views
    Commentary Magazine ^ | February 7, 2010 | Jennifer Rubin
    The chattering class was entranced with candidate Barack Obama. So literate. So polished. So cool. We were assured that his lack of executive experience was irrelevant. After all, he ran a campaign. And then there were his years as a community organizer and Harvard Law Review editor, which showed… well… it showed something about his magnificent intellectual skills. But it turns out he lacks some key abilities — executive leadership, decisiveness, deal-making prowess, flexibility, and basic people skills — that are essential to a successful presidency. This is not simply the conclusion of conservatives. The entire country witnessed his agonizing...
  • Sting: Obama best person to handle world's 'mess' (ULTRA MEGA BARF ALERT)

    10/29/2009 11:15:54 AM PDT · by stratboy · 35 replies · 734+ views
    Brietbart ^ | Oct 29 2009 | NEKESA MUMBI MOODY
    NEW YORK (AP) - Sting isn't a religious man, but he says President Barack Obama might be a divine answer to the world's problems. In an interview, he jokes that Obama was "sent from God," but in a serious tone, he also said that Obama was the best person to handle the world's "mess." The English-born Sting says he's fascinated by American politics and those opposed to Obama. He says Obama's opponents are "aggressive and violent and full of fear."
  • Christian Symposium Offers Different Take on Aliens at Roswell UFO Festival

    05/12/2009 6:58:19 AM PDT · by SonOfDarkSkies · 180 replies · 2,098+ views
    ROSWELL, New Mexico, May 12 /Christian Newswire/ -- Alien Resistance, a Christian counter-cult outreach ministry, will hold an all-Christian-speaker Symposium on aliens during the annual Roswell UFO Festival July 3-5th, 2009. The 11 participants include 4 PhDs, 2 doctorates of ministry, 2 pastors, 2 ordained ministers, and several pastoral counselors, with 12 books written between them on the UFO/Alien topic. The Symposium will educate on the UFO/alien topic from a Biblical Christian perspective, with emphasis on counter-cult evangelism, creationism, and spiritual warfare. The event is free for the public to attend, and will be held at the Best Western Sally...
  • David Brooks: Sarah Palin "Represents A Fatal Cancer To The Republican Party"

    10/08/2008 3:16:45 PM PDT · by publius1 · 196 replies · 4,957+ views
    E-mailed to me | October 8, 2008 | Danny Shea
    David Brooks spoke frankly about the presidential and vice presidential candidates Monday afternoon, calling Sarah Palin a "fatal cancer to the Republican party" but describing John McCain and Barack Obama as "the two best candidates we've had in a long time." In an interview with The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg at New York's Le Cirque restaurant to unveil that magazine's redesign, Brooks decried Palin's anti-intellectualism and compared her to President Bush in that regard: [Sarah Palin] represents a fatal cancer to the Republican party. When I first started in journalism, I worked at the National Review for Bill Buckley. And Buckley...
  • In the ’60s, a Future Candidate Poured Her Heart Out in Letters

    07/28/2007 11:42:02 AM PDT · by Raebie · 123 replies · 4,329+ views
    The New York Times ^ | July 28, 2007 | Mark Leibovich
    WASHINGTON, July 28 — They were high school friends from Park Ridge, Ill., both high achievers headed East to college. John Peavoy was a bookish film buff bound for Princeton, Hillary Rodham a driven, civic-minded Republican going off to Wellesley. They were not especially close, but they found each other smart and “interesting” and said they would try to keep in touch. Which they did, prodigiously, exchanging dozens of letters between the late summer of 1965 and the spring of 1969. Ms. Rodham’s 30 dispatches are by turns angst-ridden and prosaic, glib and brooding, anguished and ebullient — a rare...
  • Chavez: Halloween part of U.S. culture of terror

    10/30/2005 2:34:24 PM PST · by Kitten Festival · 33 replies · 1,010+ views
    AP via CNN ^ | October 30, 2005
    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -- President Hugo Chavez urged Venezuelan parents not to dress their children in costumes for Halloween, calling it a U.S. custom that has no place in the South American country's cultural traditions. Speaking during his weekly radio and television show Sunday, Chavez called Halloween a "gringa," or North American, custom. "Families go and begin to disguise their children as witches," Chavez said. "That is contrary to our ways." Chavez said he was urging Venezuelans to reflect on the subject. In recent years it has become common to see Venezuelan parents holding parties for children dressed as ghouls,...
  • Rock Star Role Models Win New Fans (Hextople Barf Alert!)

    06/17/2004 4:36:59 PM PDT · by qam1 · 20 replies · 1,047+ views
    Reuters ^ | 6/17/04 | Jill Serjeant
    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Hip-swiveling Elvis, womanizer Mick Jagger and "Material Girl" Madonna may be some of rock 'n' roll's greatest musical icons but as positive role models, they've yet to win many fans. Think again, argues rock critic Tim Riley. Far from being pilloried as a destructive influence on American youth, Riley says the best rock 'n' roll music celebrated sexual openness, honored tolerance, individualism and social responsibility in a way that helped baby boomers become better partners and better parents. "Rock actually helped lead the culture toward a healthier, happier paradigm of male-female relations," Riley writes in his...
  • Greying the Societal Zebra [Dumbest college paper article EVER?]

    04/04/2003 9:45:45 AM PST · by bourbon · 35 replies · 319+ views
    Kansas State Collegian ^ | 04/03/03 | Zach Hauser
    Column: Greying the Societal Zebra Everyday life losing clear distinctions, constantly gaining contradictions Published on Thursday, April 3, 2003 Illustration by Adam Hayes/Collegian Zach Hauser Kansas State Collegian If you commit a crime, there is a set punishment. When you read a book in English, you read from left to right. It is as straightforward and as black and white as the pages and ink with which it is printed. But that is where the buck stops, consistency vanishes and common sense becomes quite uncommon. In a society where our foundation is built on black and white, where according to...