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Keyword: quantum

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  • New Support for Alternative Quantum View

    05/17/2016 11:13:33 AM PDT · by Reeses · 30 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | May 16, 2016 | Dan Falk
    An experiment claims to have invalidated a decades-old criticism against pilot-wave theory, an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the most baffling features of the subatomic universe. Of the many counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics, perhaps the most challenging to our notions of common sense is that particles do not have locations until they are observed. This is exactly what the standard view of quantum mechanics, often called the Copenhagen interpretation, asks us to believe. Instead of the clear-cut positions and movements of Newtonian physics, we have a cloud of probabilities described by a mathematical structure known as a...
  • A different picture of quantum surrealism

    02/22/2016 10:57:24 AM PST · by Reeses · 54 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | Feb 22, 2016 | Cathal O'Connell, science writer based in Melbourne
    With its ideas of particles zipping in and out of existence, quantum mechanics is probably the kookiest-sounding theory in science. And our understanding of it is little helped by the mysterious "probability fields" most physicists say dictate the zipping. But a more intuitive picture may lie beneath. As new research demonstrates, beneath the shroud of probability, particles can in fact be viewed as behaving like billiard balls rolling along a table - although in surreal fashion. The result helps resurrect an 80-year-old picture of quantum mechanics, and provides one of the most stirring demonstrations yet of an effect Einstein called...
  • First Macroscopic Quantum Entanglement Performed At Room Temperature

    02/05/2016 11:32:15 AM PST · by Reeses · 43 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 5 2016 | Futurism
    In a breakthrough in quantum physics, scientists were able to create the phenomenon of quantum entanglement macroscopically using large magnets at room temperature. ... scientists working at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory revealed that they were able to create quantum entanglement at a macroscopic level at room temperature on a semiconductor chip, using atomic nuclei and the application of relatively small magnetic fields. Their breakthrough, which is published in Science Advances, is not only significant in what they accomplished but also how they accomplished it. In quantum physics, the creation of entanglement in particles larger and...
  • Could teleportation become a reality?

    12/29/2015 2:39:13 PM PST · by DFG · 49 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 12/29/2015 | Richard Gray
    It might seem like more of a magic trick than real science, but physicists have successfully made a 'cloud' of atoms exist in two separate places at the same time. The laws of standard physics dictate an object can't be in two places at once, but the researchers have exploited a quirk of tiny particles that exist in the quantum world, and applied this to atoms. Their breakthrough raises the prospect of being able to send not just information but perhaps even 'recreate' physical objects over large distances in a form of teleportation.
  • What Are Quantum Gravity's Alternatives To String Theory?

    12/19/2015 7:19:11 AM PST · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Fortune ^ | December 17, 2015 | Ethan Slegel
    The Universe we know and love — with Einstein’s General Relativity as our theory of gravity and quantum field theories of the other three forces — has a problem that we don’t often talk about: it’s incomplete, and we know it. Einstein’s theory on its own is just fine, describing how matter-and-energy relate to the curvature of space-and-time. Quantum field theories on their own are fine as well, describing how particles interact and experience forces. Normally, the quantum field theory calculations are done in flat space, where spacetime isn’t curved. We can do them in the curved space described by...
  • Google says they have a quantum computer 100 million times faster than anything on the market

    12/11/2015 8:48:12 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 40 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 12/11/2015 | Sophie Bushwick, Popular Science
    This week, Google announced a breakthrough that could prove its quantum computer is actually using quantum mechanics. When researchers gave the D-Wave 2X a carefully crafted test problem, the 1,000-qubit computer solved it 100,000,000 times faster than a classical computer could. Quite a few tech giants and government organizations are investing in quantum computing. And many of them, including Google, NASA, and Lockheed Martin, are working with the commercial quantum computers built by D-Wave. The idea is that these devices can harness the counterintuitive effects of quantum mechanics to solve problems faster than conventional computers, which could potentially improve artificial...
  • Google and NASA Say Their Quantum Computer Finally Works

    12/09/2015 3:33:55 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | WIlliam Herkewitz
    The actual problem that computer scientists threw at the D-Wave Two is pretty esoteric. To oversimplify it, they asked the machine to pick the optimum choice out of a large jumble of information with nearly 1,000 variables. Such optimization problems, which involve weighing multiple choices against each other, should be far, far easier for quantum computers to crunch. That's because the basis of quantum computation, the qubit, uses the odd physics of quantum mechanic to hold information as a zero, one, or a superposition of both. Again, to over-simplify things, this allows quantum computers to consider a vast number of...
  • Google says its quantum computer is 100 million times faster than PC

    12/09/2015 10:50:14 AM PST · by ShadowAce · 27 replies
    The Register ^ | 9 December 2015 | Iain Thomson
    Two years ago Google and NASA bought a D-Wave 2X quantum computing system and the Chocolate Factory has now pronounced itself very pleased with the results. "We found that for problem instances involving nearly 1000 binary variables, quantum annealing significantly outperforms its classical counterpart, simulated annealing. It is more than 108 times faster than simulated annealing running on a single core," Hartmut Neven, Google's director of engineering reported on Tuesday. Now comparing almost any operation against a single core is a bit of a fudge, but the results show that Google and NASA certainly feel D-Wave's take on quantum computing...
  • Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time

    11/17/2015 6:53:19 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Science alert ^ | 11/17/15 | FIONA MACDONALD
    Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time And so it begins... FIONA MACDONALD 17 NOV 2015 For the first time, Australian engineers have demonstratedthat they can write and manipulate the quantum version of computer code on a silicon microchip. This was done by entangling two quantum bits with the highest accuracy ever recorded, and it means that we can now start to program for the super-powerful quantum computers of the future.Engineers code regular computers using traditional bits, which can be in one of two states: 1 or 0. Together, two bits...
  • Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing

    10/05/2015 1:38:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Oct 5, 2015
    The significant advance, by a team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney appears today in the international journal Nature. "What we have is a game changer," said team leader Andrew Dzurak, Scientia Professor and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility at UNSW. "We've demonstrated a two-qubit logic gate - the central building block of a quantum computer - and, significantly, done it in silicon. Because we use essentially the same device technology as existing computer chips, we believe it will be much easier to manufacture a full-scale processor chip than for any of the leading...
  • IBM engineers carbon nanotube transistors to replace silicon in computing

    10/02/2015 10:07:16 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies
    venturebeat.com ^ | October 1, 2015 11:00 AM | Dean Takahashi
    Above: IBM's carbon nanotubes have tiny circuits that are fractions of a meter apart.Image Credit: IBM Carbon nanotubes are the leading candidate to replace silicon in semiconductor chips after the decades-long run of silicon electronics runs out. And IBM is hoping to usher along that transition with a new breakthrough being announced today.In the October 2 issue of the journal Science, IBM researchers say they have overcome one of the most daunting challenges around carbon nanotube transistors, which are the building blocks of electronic circuits with dimensions that are measured in billionths of a meter. Carbon nanotubes may be...
  • IBM's $3bn bet on next-gen computers: Carbon nanotubes, neuro chips

    07/12/2014 10:46:29 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 9 Jul 2014 | Jack Clark,
    IBM boffins have been given a tidy $3bn cash pile to solve a problem that lurks not too far in our future. That problem is the imminent breakdown in conventional chip operation and chip materials as we shrink transistor gates from today's 14nm process size to 10nm and 7nm. At around 7nm, which most industry observers expect we will hit in the early 2020s, things start to get really unpleasant. More and more jostling electrons jump in and out of gates against processor designers' wishes, leading to a frustrating problem known as gate current leakage. ... These investment areas include:...
  • Schrdingers bacterium: physicists plan to put a microbe in two places at the same time

    09/17/2015 5:05:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Why Evolution is True ^ | 9/17/15 | Jerry Coyne
    Schrödinger’s bacterium: physicists plan to put a microbe in two places at the same time Okay, this is WAY above my pay grade, but I’ve been sent articles on this by several authors, including an explanation at the Guardian. It’s a description by two theoretical physicists of an experiment that uses quantum superposition to put a bacterium in two places at the same time. They plan to collaborate with experimentalists to actually carry it out. Here’s what the Guardian says about it: The researchers plan to build on the work of others at the University of Colorado who showed in 2013 that a tiny, vibrating...
  • Quantum computer that 'computes without running' sets efficiency record

    09/01/2015 10:33:43 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 8/31/15 | Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org)Due to quantum effects, it's possible to build a quantum computer that computes without runningor as the scientists explain, "the result of a computation may be learned without actually running the computer." So far, however, the efficiency of this process, which is called counterfactual computation (CFC), has had an upper limit of 50%, limiting its practical applications. Now in a new paper, scientists have experimentally demonstrated a slightly different version called a "generalized CFC" that has an efficiency of 85% with the potential to reach 100%. This improvement opens the doors to realizing a much greater variety of applications, such...
  • Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

    07/24/2015 10:52:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 24, 2015 | by Carla Reiter & Provided by: Argonne National Laboratory
    Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this...
  • Forsaken pentaquark particle spotted at CERN

    07/14/2015 1:55:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 7/14/15 | Matthew Chalmers
    An exotic particle made up of five quarks has been discovered a decade after experiments seemed to rule out its existence. The short-lived pentaquark was spotted by researchers analysing data on the decay of unstable particles in the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Europes particle-physics laboratory near Geneva. The finding, says LHCb spokesperson Guy Wilkinson, opens a new era in physicists understanding of the strong nuclear force that holds atomic nuclei together. The pentaquark is not just any new particle it represents a way to aggregate quarks, namely the fundamental constituents of ordinary protons...
  • Einstein saves the quantum cat

    06/19/2015 7:37:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 30 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 063-16-2015 | Provided by University of Vienna
    Einstein's theory of time and space will celebrate its 100th anniversary this year. Even today it captures the imagination of scientists. In an international collaboration, researchers from the universities of Vienna, Harvard and Queensland have now discovered that this world-famous theory can explain yet another puzzling phenomenon: the transition from quantum behavior to our classical, everyday world. Their results are published in the journal Nature Physics. In 1915 Albert Einstein formulated the theory of general relativity which fundamentally changed our understanding of gravity. He explained gravity as the manifestation of the curvature of space and time. Einstein's theory predicts that...
  • Experiment confirms quantum theory weirdness

    05/28/2015 6:02:31 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 5/27/15
    The bizarre nature of reality as laid out by quantum theory has survived another test, with scientists performing a famous experiment and proving that reality does not exist until it is measured. Physicists at The Australian National University (ANU) have conducted John Wheeler's delayed-choice thought experiment, which involves a moving object that is given the choice to act like a particle or a wave. Wheeler's experiment then asks - at which point does the object decide? Common sense says the object is either wave-like or particle-like, independent of how we measure it. But quantum physics predicts that whether you observe...
  • Quantum physics: What is really real?

    05/20/2015 9:21:49 AM PDT · by Reeses · 46 replies
    nature.com ^ | 20 May 2015 | Zeeya Merali
    Owen Maroney worries that physicists have spent the better part of a century engaging in fraud. Ever since they invented quantum theory in the early 1900s, explains Maroney, who is himself a physicist at the University of Oxford, UK, they have been talking about how strange it is — how it allows particles and atoms to move in many directions at once, for example, or to spin clockwise and anticlockwise simultaneously. But talk is not proof, says Maroney. “If we tell the public that quantum theory is weird, we better go out and test that's actually true,” he says. “Otherwise...
  • How Quantum Pairs Stitch Space-Time

    05/01/2015 10:10:32 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 4/28/15 | Jennifer Ouellette
    Hannes Hummel for Quanta MagazineTensor networks could connect space-time froth to quantum information. Next in the series Interactive: What Is Space? Chapter 2: Network Tapestry How Quantum Pairs Stitch Space-Time New tools may reveal how quantum information builds the structure of space. By: Jennifer OuelletteApril 28, 2015 Comments (8) Brian Swingle was a graduate student studying the physics of matter at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when he decided to take a few classes in string theory to round out his education because, why not? he recalled although he initially paid little heed to the concepts he...
  • Wormholes Untangle a Black Hole Paradox

    04/26/2015 10:30:30 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 4/24/15 | K.C. Cole
    Wormholes Untangle a Black Hole Paradox A bold new idea aims to link two famously discordant descriptions of nature. In doing so, it may also reveal how space-time owes its existence to the spooky connections of quantum information. By: K.C. ColeApril 24, 2015 Comments (19) One hundred years after Albert Einstein developed his general theory of relativity, physicists are still stuck with perhaps the biggest incompatibility problem in the universe. The smoothly warped space-time landscape that Einstein described is like a painting by Salvador Dal seamless, unbroken, geometric. But the quantum particles that occupy this space are more like...
  • Mathematicians Chase Moonshines Shadow

    03/13/2015 6:10:51 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 19 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 3/12/15 | Erica Klarreich
    Mathematicians Chase Moonshines Shadow Researchers are on the trail of a mysterious connection between number theory, algebra and string theory. In 1978, the mathematician John McKay noticed what seemed like an odd coincidence. He had been studying the different ways of representing the structure of a mysterious entity called the monster group, a gargantuan algebraic object that, mathematicians believed, captured a new kind of symmetry. Mathematicians werent sure that the monster group actually existed, but they knew that if it did exist, it acted in special ways in particular dimensions, the first two of which were 1 and 196,883.McKay, of...
  • The first ever photograph of light as both a particle and wave

    03/02/2015 12:52:37 PM PST · by C19fan · 28 replies
    Light behaves both as a particle and as a wave. Since the days of Einstein, scientists have been trying to directly observe both of these aspects of light at the same time. Now, scientists at EPFL have succeeded in capturing the first-ever snapshot of this dual behavior. Quantum mechanics tells us that light can behave simultaneously as a particle or a wave. However, there has never been an experiment able to capture both natures of light at the same time; the closest we have come is seeing either wave or particle, but always at different times. Taking a radically different...
  • In the quantum world, the future affects the past: Hindsight and foresight together...

    02/09/2015 1:48:40 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 32 replies
    Summary: In the quantum world, the future predicts the past. Playing a guessing game with a superconducting circuit called a qubit, a physicist has discovered a way to narrow the odds of correctly guessing the state of a two-state system. By combining information about the qubit's evolution after a target time with information about its evolution up to that time, the lab was able to narrow the odds from 50-50 to 90-10.We're so used to murder mysteries that we don't even notice how mystery authors play with time. Typically the murder occurs well before the midpoint of the book, but...
  • No Big Bang? Quantum equation predicts universe has no beginning

    02/09/2015 10:55:17 AM PST · by Red Badger · 100 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02/09/2015 | by Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org) The universe may have existed forever, according to a new model that applies quantum correction terms to complement Einstein's theory of general relativity. The model may also account for dark matter and dark energy, resolving multiple problems at once. The widely accepted age of the universe, as estimated by general relativity, is 13.8 billion years. In the beginning, everything in existence is thought to have occupied a single infinitely dense point, or singularity. Only after this point began to expand in a "Big Bang" did the universe officially begin. Although the Big Bang singularity arises directly and unavoidably from...
  • Why wormholes (probably) dont exist

    01/27/2015 2:09:07 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Galileo's Pendulum ^ | 1/26/15 | Matthew Francis
    The test rig for the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at Fermilab. I picked this image today because it kinda sorta looks like the wormhole-making machine from the film version of Contact. [Credit: moi]A lot of science fiction plot devices are devoted to getting around the speed of light. In the real Universe, nothing with mass can travel faster than light, which means we cant travel to distant stars without taking decades, centuries, or longer in transit. So, sci-fi draws from teleportation, hyperdrive, warp drive, and the ultimate cosmic short-cut: wormholes.[1] In some cases, the source of a science fiction...
  • Particles accelerate without a push (But Newton's not dead)

    01/25/2015 10:48:22 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 8 replies
    MIT News Office ^ | 1/20/15 | David L. Chandler
    New analysis shows a way to self-propel subatomic particles, extend the lifetime of unstable isotopes. David L. Chandler | MIT News Office January 20, 2015 Press Inquiries Some physical principles have been considered immutable since the time of Isaac Newton: Light always travels in straight lines. No physical object can change its speed unless some outside force acts on it. Not so fast, says a new generation of physicists: While the underlying physical laws haven’t changed, new ways of “tricking” those laws to permit seemingly impossible actions have begun to appear. For example, work that began in 2007 proved that...
  • Entanglement Makes Quantum Particles Measurably Heavier, Says Quantum Theorist

    01/10/2015 12:41:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    medium.com | arXiv.org ^ | 12/12/14 | David Edward Bruschi (orig. paper)
    The discovery is a long sought-after link between the theories of quantum mechanics and general relativityThe two towering achievements of 20th century physics are Einsteins theory of general relativity and quantum mechanics. Both have fundamentally changed the way we view the universe and our place within it. And yet they are utterly incompatible: quantum mechanics operates on the tiniest scales while relativity operates on the grandest of scales. Never the twain shall meet; although not for lack of trying on the part of several generations of theorists including Einstein himself. Now one theorist has shown that an exotic quantum effect...
  • Quantum physics just got less complicated

    12/19/2014 11:34:49 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 76 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12/19/14
    Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing. The result is published 19 December in Nature Communications. Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner made the breakthrough while at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one."The connection between uncertainty and wave-particle duality comes out very naturally when you...
  • Quantum teleportation reaches farthest distance yet

    12/10/2014 12:15:36 PM PST · by Patriot777 · 21 replies
    December 09, 2014 | Kelly Dickerson
    Per copyright law, can only provide link: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/12/09/quantum-teleportation-reaches-farthest-distance-yet/?intcmp=trending
  • Physics: Quantum computer quest

    12/05/2014 11:28:06 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 12/3/14 | Elizabeth Gibney
    When asked what he likes best about working for Google, physicist John Martinis does not mention the famous massage chairs in the hallways, or the free snacks available just about anywhere at the company's campus in Mountain View, California. Instead, he marvels at Google's tolerance of failure in pursuit of a visionary goal. If every project they try works, he says, they think they aren't trying hard enough. Martinis reckons that he is going to need that kind of patience. In September, Google recruited him and his 20-member research team from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and set them...
  • Quantum gravity: The most exciting discovery in physics could come about thanks to telecoms satellit

    11/28/2014 9:51:43 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 39 replies
    aeon ^ | 11/11/14 | Sidney Perkowitz
    Quantum gravity The most exciting discovery in physics could come about thanks to telecoms satellites. Is a single theory of reality in sight? Kindle ESAs Optical Ground Station in the Canary Islands has set a new distance world record in quantum teleportation by reproducing the characteristics of a light particle across 143 km of open air. Photo courtesy ESA Sidney Perkowitz is professor of physics emeritus at Emory University in Atlanta. His latest books are Slow Light (2011) and Hollywood Chemistry (2014), and he is at work on a new edition of Universal Foam (2001). Watching a rocket as it...
  • Is Quantum Entanglement Real?

    11/14/2014 9:04:13 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 48 replies
    NY Times ^ | 11/14/14 | David Kaiser
    FIFTY years ago this month, the Irish physicist John Stewart Bell submitted a short, quirky article to a fly-by-night journal titled Physics, Physique, Fizika. He had been too shy to ask his American hosts, whom he was visiting during a sabbatical, to cover the steep page charges at a mainstream journal, the Physical Review. Though the journal he selected folded a few years later, his paper became a blockbuster. Today it is among the most frequently cited physics articles of all time. Bells paper made important claims about quantum entanglement, one of those captivating features of quantum theory that depart...
  • A quantum world arising from many ordinary ones

    10/25/2014 2:08:48 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    Nature ^ | 10/24/14 | Alexandra Witze
    The bizarre behaviour of the quantum world with objects existing in two places simultaneously and light behaving as either waves or particles could result from interactions between many 'parallel' everyday worlds, a new theory suggests. It is a fundamental shift from previous quantum interpretations, says Howard Wiseman, a theoretical quantum physicist at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, who together with his colleagues describes the idea in Physical Review X1. Theorists have tried to explain quantum behaviour through various mathematical frameworks. One of the older interpretations envisages the classical world as stemming from the existence of many simultaneous quantum...
  • Our quantum problem

    09/29/2014 4:34:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    Aeon ^ | 1/28/14 | Adrian Kent
    In 1909, Ernest Rutherford, Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden took a piece of radium and used it to fire charged particles at a sheet of gold foil. They wanted to test the then-dominant theory that atoms were simply clusters of electrons floating in little seas of positive electrical charge (the so-called ‘plum pudding’ model). What came next, said Rutherford, was ‘the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life’. Despite the airy thinness of the foil, a small fraction of the particles bounced straight back at the source – a result, Rutherford noted, ‘as incredible as...
  • The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?

    08/10/2014 8:20:11 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 7/29/14
    The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? Jul 29, 2014 Enlarge The basic idea of the Quantum Cheshire Cat: In an interferometer, an object is separated from one if its properties -- like a cat, moving on a different path than its own grin. Credit: TU Vienna / Leon Filter The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland" is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from its properties? It is possible in the quantum world. In an experiment, neutrons travel...
  • Quantum Computing's 'Weird Magical Ingredient' Revealed

    06/12/2014 6:24:21 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    hngn.com ^ | Jun 12, 2014 01:40 PM EDT | Rebekah Marcarelli
    An aspect of quantum theory called contextuality is crucial for achieving universal quantum computation, a University of Waterloo Institute of Quantum Computing news release reported. ... Quantum devices are almost impossible to build because they need to operate in a noise-resistant environment. The "magic" is a new approach to building a noise-resistant quantum computer. The process is known as magic-state distillation. By identifying this "magic" state researchers could be closer to achieving a universal quantum computer. ... In the real world measurements look at the property of something but in quantum terms what is observed really depends on how the...
  • Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's famous 1927 principle

    04/29/2014 10:27:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-29-2014 | Provided by American Institute of Physics
    Nearly 90 years after Werner Heisenberg pioneered his uncertainty principle, a group of researchers from three countries has provided substantial new insight into this fundamental tenet of quantum physics with the first rigorous formulation supporting the uncertainty principle as Heisenberg envisioned it. In the Journal of Mathematical Physics, the researchers reports a new way of defining measurement errors that is applicable in the quantum domain and enables a precise characterization of the fundamental limits of the information accessible in quantum experiments. Quantum mechanics requires that we devise approximate joint measurements because the theory itself prohibits simultaneous ideal measurements of position...
  • Evidence of young universe's growth spurt is discovered

    03/18/2014 1:56:49 AM PDT · by blueplum · 21 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | March 17, 2014 11:56pm | Amina Khan
    Researchers focusing on gravitational waves find the first direct evidence for the theory of cosmic inflation, a faster-than-light expansion just after the big bang. Scientists staring at the faint afterglow from the universe's birth 13.8 billion years ago have discovered the first direct evidence for the theory of cosmic inflation the mysterious and violent expansion after the big bang. The findings, made using radio telescopes at the South Pole, support the idea that our known cosmos make up just a tiny fragment in a much larger, unknown frontier that extends far beyond the reaches of light. During this period...
  • How to see quantum gravity in Big Bang traces

    09/30/2013 11:28:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 9/27/13 | Ron Cowen
    The cosmic microwave background sky, here mapped by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, has a polarization, represented by white bars. Future experiments might measure the polarization with enough sensitivity to prove the existence of gravitons, the quanta of gravity. Can a quantum of gravity ever be detected? Two physicists suggest that it can using the entire Universe as a detector. Researchers think that the gravitational force is transmitted by an elementary particle called the graviton, just as the electromagnetic force is carried by photons. But most of them despair about ever recording individual gravitons. That is because gravity is...
  • Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter (light sabers, anyone?)

    09/25/2013 3:40:05 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/25/13
    Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter Photons with strong mutual attraction in a quantum nonlinear medium. Harvard and MIT scientists are challenging the conventional wisdom about light, and they didn't need to go to a galaxy far, far away to do it. Working with colleagues at the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms, a group led by Harvard Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin and MIT Professor of Physics Vladan Vuletic have managed to coax photons into binding together to form molecules a state of matter that, until recently, had been purely theoretical. The work is described in a September 25...
  • A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

    09/19/2013 5:59:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    SimonsFoundation.org ^ | 9/17/13 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics Artists rendering of the amplituhedron, a newly discovered mathematical object resembling a multifaceted jewel in higher dimensions. Encoded in its volume are the most basic features of reality that can be calculated the probabilities of outcomes of particle interactions. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before, said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has...
  • Black Holes Feed On Quantum Foam, Says Cosmologist

    09/12/2013 6:29:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    Nobody knows how the universe’s biggest black holes grow so large. Now one astrophysicist says it’s because they feed on the quantum foam that makes up the fabric of spacetime One of the more fascinating astrophysical discoveries in recent years is that almost all galaxies hide supermassive black holes at their cores. Indeed, astronomers believe that galaxies and black holes have a kind of symbiotic relationship so that one cannot form or grow without the other. The evidence comes from observations of galaxies both near and far—almost all contain huge black holes. But that raises an interesting question. We see...
  • Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical [to] the quantum world

    09/09/2013 4:10:37 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/9/13
    Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical the quantum world 10 hours ago Enlarge Principle of the experiment: In the beginning the atom cloud is prepared in an almost perfectly ordered quantum state (symbolized by gray atoms). Over time, this quantum order is lost and disorder spreads through the system with a certain well-defined velocity (symbolized by the mixture of red and gray atoms). This disorder can be associated with the emergence of a temperature. The initial quantum properties are lost only through interactions between the atoms, without any influence from the outside world. How does a...
  • Quantum steps towards the Big Bang

    09/03/2013 5:19:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    A new approach to the unification of general theory of relativity and quantum theory Present-day physics cannot describe what happened in the Big Bang. Quantum theory and the theory of relativity fail in this almost infinitely dense and hot primal state of the universe. Only an all-encompassing theory of quantum gravity which unifies these two fundamental pillars of physics could provide an insight into how the universe began. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) in Golm/Potsdam and the Perimeter Institute in Canada have made an important discovery along this route. According to their theory,...
  • Lawrence Krauss: Quantum Computing Explained (YouTube video, 3min52sec)

    09/02/2013 7:23:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Video here. (Duration: 3 minutes, 52 seconds)
  • Engage! Warp Drive Could Become Reality with Quantum-Thruster Physics

    08/24/2013 8:14:33 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Space.com ^ | 8/21/13 | Miriam Kramer
    DALLAS Warp-drive technology, a form of "faster than light" travel popularized by TV's "Star Trek," could be bolstered by the physics of quantum thrusters another science-fiction idea made plausible by modern science. NASA scientists are performing experiments that could help make warp drive a possibility sometime in the future from a lab built for the Apollo program at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. A warp-drive-enabled spacecraft would look like a football with two large rings fully encircling it. The rings would utilize an exotic form of matter to cause space-time to contract in front of and expand...
  • Quantum transistors at room temp

    06/24/2013 11:38:53 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 8 replies
    The Register ^ | 24 June 2013 | Richard Chirgwin
    The world might still be 20 years from the end of Moore's Law, but the hunt for technologies to replace semiconductors is going on right now. A group from Michigan Technological University is offering one such alternative: a quantum tunnelling transistor that operates at room temperature. The culmination of work begun in 2007, their demonstration has been published in Advanced Materials, here (abstract). Moore's famous observation (the number of transistors on an IC doubles roughly every two years) is one day going to run into two physical constraints: the feature size of the transistor, and its ability to dissipate heat....
  • Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years

    05/06/2013 6:00:49 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 38 replies
    Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers One of the dreams for security experts is the creation of a quantum internet that allows perfectly secure communication based on the powerful laws of quantum mechanics.The basic idea here is that the act of measuring a quantum object, such as a photon, always changes it. So any attempt to eavesdrop on a quantum message cannot fail to leave telltale signs...
  • Astrophysics: Fire in the hole! (Black hole firewalls, relativity vs. quantum mechanics)

    04/05/2013 5:46:23 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | 4/3/13 | Zeeya Merali
    n March 2012, Joseph Polchinski began to contemplate suicide at least in mathematical form. A string theorist at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, Polchinski was pondering what would happen to an astronaut who dived into a black hole. Obviously, he would die. But how? According to the then-accepted account, he wouldnt feel anything special at first, even when his fall took him through the black holes event horizon: the invisible boundary beyond which nothing can escape. But eventually after hours, days or even weeks if the black hole was big enough he...