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Keyword: quantum

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  • WILL CHINA LEAD A STAMPEDE OUT OF THE US DOLLAR? (Very informative charts!)

    11/29/2006 5:30:58 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 284 replies · 3,754+ views
    FinacialSense ^ | November 29, 2006 | Gary Dorsch
    WILL CHINA LEAD A STAMPEDE OUT OF THE US DOLLAR? by Gary Dorsch Editor, Global Money Trends Magazine November 29, 2006 The $2 trillion per day foreign exchange market never sleeps. Yet for the past six months, the big-3 central banks, the Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank, and the Bank of Japan managed to lull the currency markets into a deep trance. Since last May, the big-3 central banks corralled the US dollar to within a 3% to 5% trading range against the British pound, the Euro and Japanese yen. The big-3 central banks utilized their three major weapons,...
  • Atom spied interfering with electron flow

    11/28/2006 8:10:33 PM PST · by annie laurie · 10 replies · 696+ views
    NewScientistTech ^ | 27 November 2006 | Will Knight
    An individual "dopant" atom has been spied interfering with the flow of electrons through a silicon transistor for the first time. Researchers say the feat could help scientists squeeze more power out of conventional computers and ultimately develop silicon-based quantum computers. Dopants are chemical impurities that affect the flow of electrons through a conducting or semiconducting material. They are deliberately added to pure silicon, for example, to create different types of electronic component. To analyse a lone dopant atom in action, Sven Rogge and colleagues at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands cryogenically cooled 35-nanometre-wide silicon wires, taken from...
  • Scientists present method for entangling macroscopic objects

    10/30/2006 7:29:53 PM PST · by annie laurie · 15 replies · 639+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | October 24, 2006 | Lisa Zyga
    Building upon recent studies on optomechanical entanglement with lasers and mirrors, a group of scientists has developed a theoretical model using entanglement swapping in order to entangle two micromechanical oscillators. This ability could lead to advances in information processing, as well as other applications that use micromechanical resonators, such as electrometers, displacement detectors, and radio frequency signal processors, wrote scientists Stefano Pirandola et al. in a recent Physical Review Letters. "Until now, entanglement has been observed only for optical modes, i.e., photons (which are massless particles)," Pirandola told PhysOrg.com. "The significance of purely mechanical entanglement would be that it involves...
  • Spooky steps to a quantum network

    10/09/2006 10:12:30 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 11 replies · 763+ views
    NewScientistTech ^ | 04 October 2006 | Zeeya Merali
    Even if quantum computers can be made to work, there will still be two big obstacles preventing quantum networks becoming a reality. First, quantum bits, or qubits, stored in matter will have to be transferred to photons to be transmitted over long distances. Secondly, errors that creep in during transmission have to be corrected. Two unrelated studies have now shown how to clear these hurdles. Both studies use quantum entanglement, a spooky property that links particles however far apart they are. Measuring a quantum property on one particle immediately affects the other, and this effect can be used to “teleport”...
  • Scientists teleport two different objects

    10/04/2006 7:11:24 PM PDT · by TampaDude · 36 replies · 1,592+ views
    CNN.com ^ | 10/04/2006 | Reuters
    LONDON, England (Reuters) -- Beaming people in Star Trek fashion is still in the realms of science fiction but physicists in Denmark have teleported information from light to matter bringing quantum communication and computing closer to reality. Until now scientists have teleported similar objects such as light or single atoms over short distances from one spot to another in a split second. But Professor Eugene Polzik and his team at the Niels Bohr Institute at Copenhagen University in Denmark have made a breakthrough by using both light and matter. "It is one step further because for the first time it...
  • Tracing the limits of quantum weirdness

    09/14/2006 8:19:40 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 16 replies · 724+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 13 September 2006 | Mark Buchanan
    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle limits what we can know about the quantum world. Now the uncertainty principle is being harnessed to see if it is possible to identify a point at which matter begins to exhibit weird quantum behaviour. ... Schwab's team fabricated a nanoscale resonator - the equivalent of a tiny pendulum - on a silicon chip, which oscillates at 20 megahertz. On the same chip, they created a single-electron transistor and electrically coupled it to the resonator in such a way that any change in the resonator's position caused a change in the transistor's current. Measuring the current should...
  • 'Electron-spin' trick boosts quantum computing

    08/21/2006 7:17:02 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 28 replies · 760+ views
    NewScientist Tech ^ | 16 August 2006 | Unattributed
    A new silicon chip capable of manipulating the spin of a single electron could ultimately allow futuristic quantum computers to be built using conventional electronic technology, researchers say. A quantum bit, or "qubit", is analogous the bits used in conventional computers. But, instead of simply switching between two states, representing "0" and "1", quantum physics permits a qubit to exist in more than one state simultaneously, until its state is measured. This means quantum computers can essentially perform multiple calculations at once, giving them the potential to be exponentially more powerful than conventional computers ... 'Breakthrough experiment' Researchers have also...
  • Quantum Computer: Laser tweezers sort atoms

    07/23/2006 5:30:08 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 16 replies · 3,141+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | July 12, 2006 | University of Bonn
    Physicists of the University of Bonn have taken one more important hurdle on the path to what is known as a quantum computer: by using 'laser tweezers' they have succeeded in sorting up to seven atoms and lining them up. The researchers filmed this process and report on their breakthrough in the next issue of the prestigious journal Nature (13th July 2006). In the experiment the research team headed by Dr. Arno Rauschenbeutel and Professor Dieter Meschede decelerated several caesium atoms for a period of several seconds so that they were hardly moving, then loaded them onto a 'conveyor belt'...
  • French court upholds Soros' conviction (Fights insider trading conviction nearly 20 years ago)

    06/14/2006 9:22:41 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 37 replies · 1,185+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 6/14/06 | Angela Domand - ap
    PARIS - France's highest court upheld George Soros' conviction for insider trading Wednesday in a case dating back nearly 20 years, and the billionaire investor vowed to fight the ruling at the European Court of Human Rights. The Court of Cassation upheld the 75-year-old American financier's conviction for buying and selling Societe Generale shares in 1988 after receiving information about a planned corporate raid on the bank. Apart from this case, Soros' record is unblemished after five decades in finance. Lawyer Ron Soffer said Soros planned to take the case to the European Court of Human Rights, saying that the...
  • The universe before it began

    05/24/2006 3:59:24 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 125 replies · 3,036+ views
    Seed Magazine ^ | 5/22/06 | Maggie Wittlin
    Scientists use quantum gravity to describe the universe before the Big Bang.Scientists may finally have an answer to a "big" question: If the Big Bang was the beginning of the universe, what could have caused it to happen? Using a theory called "loop quantum gravity," a group led by Penn State professor Abhay Ashtekar has shown that just before the Big Bang occurred, another universe very similar to ours may have been contracting. According to the group's findings, this previous universe eventually became so dense that a normally negligible repulsive component of the gravitational force overpowered the attractive component, causing...
  • Prime Numbers Get Hitched

    04/11/2006 3:08:56 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 173 replies · 3,850+ views
    Seed Magazine ^ | Feb/Mar 2006 | Marcus du Sautoy
    In their search for patterns, mathematicians have uncovered unlikely connections between prime numbers and quantum physics. Will the subatomic world help reveal the elusive nature of the primes?In 1972, the physicist Freeman Dyson wrote an article called "Missed Opportunities." In it, he describes how relativity could have been discovered many years before Einstein announced his findings if mathematicians in places like Göttingen had spoken to physicists who were poring over Maxwell's equations describing electromagnetism. The ingredients were there in 1865 to make the breakthrough—only announced by Einstein some 40 years later. It is striking that Dyson should have written about...
  • Quantum computer works best switched off

    02/23/2006 3:58:12 AM PST · by S0122017 · 114 replies · 2,602+ views
    NewScientist ^ | 22 February 2006
    Quantum computer works best switched off Even for the crazy world of quantum mechanics, this one is twisted. A quantum computer program has produced an answer without actually running. The idea behind the feat, first proposed in 1998, is to put a quantum computer into a “superposition”, a state in which it is both running and not running. It is as if you asked Schrödinger's cat to hit "Run". With the right set-up, the theory suggested, the computer would sometimes get an answer out of the computer even though the program did not run. And now researchers from the University...
  • Is Consciousness Quantum?

    02/12/2006 9:37:11 PM PST · by TBP · 54 replies · 505+ views
    I AM Spirit ^ | February 14, 2006 | Tim Phares, RScP
    "Consciousness is the singular for which there is no plural," wrote the scientist Erwin Schroedinger. Schroedinger, famous for his theoretical disappearing cat, was one of the pioneers of quantum science. Lately, I've been contemplating the idea, if I understand it correctly (I am emphatically NOT a scientist), that things in a quantum Universe are essentially wavicles -- potentially, at least, in several places at once, achieving locality only when observed. Only when we focus on them do they show up in a specific place called here. The essential principle is that there is an observer consciousness that is the overriding...
  • Woman is Found Dead in Box( Waco, TX Hmmmm )

    12/16/2005 12:33:39 PM PST · by devane617 · 26 replies · 1,397+ views
    KXXV-TV Waco, TX ^ | 12/16/2005 | KXXV TV
    Woman is Found Dead in Box — (12/15/2005) It was a tragic discovery Wednesday morning in Waco. The owner of Brake and Clutch Supply Store at 407 South 8th Street found the body of 45 year old Jackie Berkley of College Station. The businessman was picking up trash when he found Berkley in a large box on the front parking lot. She was pronounced dead at the scene. It’s believed she died from natural causes. But an autopsy was ordered, and for now police are calling it a questionable death.
  • Fuel's paradise? Power source that turns physics on its head

    11/05/2005 8:12:38 AM PST · by nsmart · 55 replies · 1,773+ views
    The Guardian ^ | Friday November 4, 2005 | Alok Jha, science correspondent
    · Scientist says device disproves quantum theory · Opponents claim idea is result of wrong maths It seems too good to be true: a new source of near-limitless power that costs virtually nothing, uses tiny amounts of water as its fuel and produces next to no waste. If that does not sound radical enough, how about this: the principle behind the source turns modern physics on its head. Randell Mills, a Harvard University medic who also studied electrical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, claims to have built a prototype power source that generates up to 1,000 times more heat...
  • Fuel's paradise? Power source that turns physics on its head

    11/07/2005 10:19:55 AM PST · by Scythian · 46 replies · 2,182+ views
    The Guardian ^ | Friday November 4, 2005 | Alok Jha, science correspondent
    It seems too good to be true: a new source of near-limitless power that costs virtually nothing, uses tiny amounts of water as its fuel and produces next to no waste. If that does not sound radical enough, how about this: the principle behind the source turns modern physics on its head. http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/story/0,3605,1627424,00.html
  • Fuel's paradise? Power source that turns physics on its head

    11/04/2005 5:06:51 PM PST · by Anthem · 176 replies · 4,548+ views
    The Guardian ^ | Friday November 4, 2005 | Alok Jha, science correspondent
    · Scientist says device disproves quantum theory · Opponents claim idea is result of wrong maths It seems too good to be true: a new source of near-limitless power that costs virtually nothing, uses tiny amounts of water as its fuel and produces next to no waste. If that does not sound radical enough, how about this: the principle behind the source turns modern physics on its head. Randell Mills, a Harvard University medic who also studied electrical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, claims to have built a prototype power source that generates up to 1,000 times more heat...
  • Hitachi Claims Quantum-Computing Breakthrough

    09/02/2005 11:55:36 AM PDT · by ImaGraftedBranch · 62 replies · 2,494+ views
    EE Times ^ | 9/1/2005 | Peter Clarke
    The experiment, done at the company's Cambridge, England, labs, is a step toward developing a new generation of highly powerful processors. By Peter Clarke,  EE Times Sept. 1, 2005 URL: http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=170102712 LONDON — A team at Hitachi’s Cambridge Laboratory at the University of Cambridge in England has developed a silicon device for quantum computing: a quantum-dot charge “qubit”. This structure, based on Hitachi's many years of work on single-electron devices, is the first step in the development of a quantum computer based on conventional silicon technology, according to Hitachi Europe Ltd. Quantum computers make use of quantum bits (qubits), which...
  • ANOTHER COOL IDEA FROM TEXAS (Physicists at UT Discovered "quantum refrigerator" to Cool Atoms)

    08/13/2005 2:13:42 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies · 346+ views
    U-WIRE | Aug. 10, 2005 | Amanda Pinkston
    Physicists at the University of Texas have discovered the "quantum refrigerator," which might prove to be the next big breakthrough in atom-cooling. No, it can't chill a beer, but this "refrigerator" can drop the temperature of a wide range of atoms and particles to nearly absolute zero – -459 degrees Fahrenheit – allowing scientists to better control the atom's motion. The current atom-cooling techniques are laser cooling, which was realized experimentally in the 1980s and resulted in a Nobel Prize in 1997, and evaporative cooling, which resulted in a Nobel Prize in 2001. The methods are limited, however, because they...
  • No paradox for time travellers

    06/20/2005 9:35:37 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 72 replies · 1,754+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 6/18/05 | Mark Buchanan
    THE laws of physics seem to permit time travel, and with it, paradoxical situations such as the possibility that people could go back in time to prevent their own birth. But it turns out that such paradoxes may be ruled out by the weirdness inherent in laws of quantum physics. Some solutions to the equations of Einstein's general theory of relativity lead to situations in which space-time curves back on itself, theoretically allowing travellers to loop back in time and meet younger versions of themselves. Because such time travel sets up paradoxes, many researchers suspect that some physical constraints must...