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Keyword: quantum

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  • In the quantum world, the future affects the past: Hindsight and foresight together...

    02/09/2015 1:48:40 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 31 replies
    Summary: In the quantum world, the future predicts the past. Playing a guessing game with a superconducting circuit called a qubit, a physicist has discovered a way to narrow the odds of correctly guessing the state of a two-state system. By combining information about the qubit's evolution after a target time with information about its evolution up to that time, the lab was able to narrow the odds from 50-50 to 90-10.We're so used to murder mysteries that we don't even notice how mystery authors play with time. Typically the murder occurs well before the midpoint of the book, but...
  • No Big Bang? Quantum equation predicts universe has no beginning

    02/09/2015 10:55:17 AM PST · by Red Badger · 100 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02/09/2015 | by Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org) —The universe may have existed forever, according to a new model that applies quantum correction terms to complement Einstein's theory of general relativity. The model may also account for dark matter and dark energy, resolving multiple problems at once. The widely accepted age of the universe, as estimated by general relativity, is 13.8 billion years. In the beginning, everything in existence is thought to have occupied a single infinitely dense point, or singularity. Only after this point began to expand in a "Big Bang" did the universe officially begin. Although the Big Bang singularity arises directly and unavoidably from...
  • Why wormholes (probably) don’t exist

    01/27/2015 2:09:07 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Galileo's Pendulum ^ | 1/26/15 | Matthew Francis
    The test rig for the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at Fermilab. I picked this image today because it kinda sorta looks like the wormhole-making machine from the film version of Contact. [Credit: moi]A lot of science fiction plot devices are devoted to getting around the speed of light. In the real Universe, nothing with mass can travel faster than light, which means we can’t travel to distant stars without taking decades, centuries, or longer in transit. So, sci-fi draws from teleportation, hyperdrive, warp drive, and the ultimate cosmic short-cut: wormholes.[1] In some cases, the source of a science fiction...
  • Particles accelerate without a push (But Newton's not dead)

    01/25/2015 10:48:22 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 8 replies
    MIT News Office ^ | 1/20/15 | David L. Chandler
    New analysis shows a way to self-propel subatomic particles, extend the lifetime of unstable isotopes. David L. Chandler | MIT News Office January 20, 2015 Press Inquiries Some physical principles have been considered immutable since the time of Isaac Newton: Light always travels in straight lines. No physical object can change its speed unless some outside force acts on it. Not so fast, says a new generation of physicists: While the underlying physical laws haven’t changed, new ways of “tricking” those laws to permit seemingly impossible actions have begun to appear. For example, work that began in 2007 proved that...
  • Entanglement Makes Quantum Particles Measurably Heavier, Says Quantum Theorist

    01/10/2015 12:41:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    medium.com | arXiv.org ^ | 12/12/14 | David Edward Bruschi (orig. paper)
    The discovery is a long sought-after link between the theories of quantum mechanics and general relativityThe two towering achievements of 20th century physics are Einstein’s theory of general relativity and quantum mechanics. Both have fundamentally changed the way we view the universe and our place within it. And yet they are utterly incompatible: quantum mechanics operates on the tiniest scales while relativity operates on the grandest of scales. Never the twain shall meet; although not for lack of trying on the part of several generations of theorists including Einstein himself. Now one theorist has shown that an exotic quantum effect...
  • Quantum physics just got less complicated

    12/19/2014 11:34:49 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 76 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12/19/14
    Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing. The result is published 19 December in Nature Communications. Patrick Coles, Jedrzej Kaniewski, and Stephanie Wehner made the breakthrough while at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one."The connection between uncertainty and wave-particle duality comes out very naturally when you...
  • Quantum teleportation reaches farthest distance yet

    12/10/2014 12:15:36 PM PST · by Patriot777 · 21 replies
    December 09, 2014 | Kelly Dickerson
    Per copyright law, can only provide link: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/12/09/quantum-teleportation-reaches-farthest-distance-yet/?intcmp=trending
  • Physics: Quantum computer quest

    12/05/2014 11:28:06 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 12/3/14 | Elizabeth Gibney
    When asked what he likes best about working for Google, physicist John Martinis does not mention the famous massage chairs in the hallways, or the free snacks available just about anywhere at the company's campus in Mountain View, California. Instead, he marvels at Google's tolerance of failure in pursuit of a visionary goal. “If every project they try works,” he says, “they think they aren't trying hard enough.” Martinis reckons that he is going to need that kind of patience. In September, Google recruited him and his 20-member research team from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and set them...
  • Quantum gravity: The most exciting discovery in physics could come about thanks to telecoms satellit

    11/28/2014 9:51:43 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 39 replies
    aeon ^ | 11/11/14 | Sidney Perkowitz
    Quantum gravity The most exciting discovery in physics could come about thanks to telecoms satellites. Is a single theory of reality in sight? Kindle ESA’s Optical Ground Station in the Canary Islands has set a new distance world record in ‘quantum teleportation’ by reproducing the characteristics of a light particle across 143 km of open air. Photo courtesy ESA Sidney Perkowitz is professor of physics emeritus at Emory University in Atlanta. His latest books are Slow Light (2011) and Hollywood Chemistry (2014), and he is at work on a new edition of Universal Foam (2001). Watching a rocket as it...
  • Is Quantum Entanglement Real?

    11/14/2014 9:04:13 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 48 replies
    NY Times ^ | 11/14/14 | David Kaiser
    FIFTY years ago this month, the Irish physicist John Stewart Bell submitted a short, quirky article to a fly-by-night journal titled Physics, Physique, Fizika. He had been too shy to ask his American hosts, whom he was visiting during a sabbatical, to cover the steep page charges at a mainstream journal, the Physical Review. Though the journal he selected folded a few years later, his paper became a blockbuster. Today it is among the most frequently cited physics articles of all time. Bell’s paper made important claims about quantum entanglement, one of those captivating features of quantum theory that depart...
  • A quantum world arising from many ordinary ones

    10/25/2014 2:08:48 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    Nature ^ | 10/24/14 | Alexandra Witze
    The bizarre behaviour of the quantum world — with objects existing in two places simultaneously and light behaving as either waves or particles — could result from interactions between many 'parallel' everyday worlds, a new theory suggests. “It is a fundamental shift from previous quantum interpretations,” says Howard Wiseman, a theoretical quantum physicist at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, who together with his colleagues describes the idea in Physical Review X1. Theorists have tried to explain quantum behaviour through various mathematical frameworks. One of the older interpretations envisages the classical world as stemming from the existence of many simultaneous quantum...
  • Our quantum problem

    09/29/2014 4:34:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    Aeon ^ | 1/28/14 | Adrian Kent
    In 1909, Ernest Rutherford, Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden took a piece of radium and used it to fire charged particles at a sheet of gold foil. They wanted to test the then-dominant theory that atoms were simply clusters of electrons floating in little seas of positive electrical charge (the so-called ‘plum pudding’ model). What came next, said Rutherford, was ‘the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life’. Despite the airy thinness of the foil, a small fraction of the particles bounced straight back at the source – a result, Rutherford noted, ‘as incredible as...
  • The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?

    08/10/2014 8:20:11 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 7/29/14
    The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? Jul 29, 2014 Enlarge The basic idea of the Quantum Cheshire Cat: In an interferometer, an object is separated from one if its properties -- like a cat, moving on a different path than its own grin. Credit: TU Vienna / Leon Filter The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland" is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from its properties? It is possible in the quantum world. In an experiment, neutrons travel...
  • Quantum Computing's 'Weird Magical Ingredient' Revealed

    06/12/2014 6:24:21 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    hngn.com ^ | Jun 12, 2014 01:40 PM EDT | Rebekah Marcarelli
    An aspect of quantum theory called contextuality is crucial for achieving universal quantum computation, a University of Waterloo Institute of Quantum Computing news release reported. ... Quantum devices are almost impossible to build because they need to operate in a noise-resistant environment. The "magic" is a new approach to building a noise-resistant quantum computer. The process is known as magic-state distillation. By identifying this "magic" state researchers could be closer to achieving a universal quantum computer. ... In the real world measurements look at the property of something but in quantum terms what is observed really depends on how the...
  • Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's famous 1927 principle

    04/29/2014 10:27:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-29-2014 | Provided by American Institute of Physics
    Nearly 90 years after Werner Heisenberg pioneered his uncertainty principle, a group of researchers from three countries has provided substantial new insight into this fundamental tenet of quantum physics with the first rigorous formulation supporting the uncertainty principle as Heisenberg envisioned it. In the Journal of Mathematical Physics, the researchers reports a new way of defining measurement errors that is applicable in the quantum domain and enables a precise characterization of the fundamental limits of the information accessible in quantum experiments. Quantum mechanics requires that we devise approximate joint measurements because the theory itself prohibits simultaneous ideal measurements of position...
  • Evidence of young universe's growth spurt is discovered

    03/18/2014 1:56:49 AM PDT · by blueplum · 21 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | March 17, 2014 11:56pm | Amina Khan
    Researchers focusing on gravitational waves find the first direct evidence for the theory of cosmic inflation, a faster-than-light expansion just after the big bang. Scientists staring at the faint afterglow from the universe's birth 13.8 billion years ago have discovered the first direct evidence for the theory of cosmic inflation — the mysterious and violent expansion after the big bang. The findings, made using radio telescopes at the South Pole, support the idea that our known cosmos make up just a tiny fragment in a much larger, unknown frontier that extends far beyond the reaches of light. During this period...
  • How to see quantum gravity in Big Bang traces

    09/30/2013 11:28:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 9/27/13 | Ron Cowen
    The cosmic microwave background sky, here mapped by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, has a polarization, represented by white bars. Future experiments might measure the polarization with enough sensitivity to prove the existence of gravitons, the quanta of gravity. Can a quantum of gravity ever be detected? Two physicists suggest that it can — using the entire Universe as a detector. Researchers think that the gravitational force is transmitted by an elementary particle called the graviton, just as the electromagnetic force is carried by photons. But most of them despair about ever recording individual gravitons. That is because gravity is...
  • Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter (light sabers, anyone?)

    09/25/2013 3:40:05 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/25/13
    Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter Photons with strong mutual attraction in a quantum nonlinear medium. Harvard and MIT scientists are challenging the conventional wisdom about light, and they didn't need to go to a galaxy far, far away to do it. Working with colleagues at the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms, a group led by Harvard Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin and MIT Professor of Physics Vladan Vuletic have managed to coax photons into binding together to form molecules – a state of matter that, until recently, had been purely theoretical. The work is described in a September 25...
  • A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

    09/19/2013 5:59:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    SimonsFoundation.org ^ | 9/17/13 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics Artist’s rendering of the amplituhedron, a newly discovered mathematical object resembling a multifaceted jewel in higher dimensions. Encoded in its volume are the most basic features of reality that can be calculated — the probabilities of outcomes of particle interactions. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.“This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has...
  • Black Holes Feed On Quantum Foam, Says Cosmologist

    09/12/2013 6:29:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    Nobody knows how the universe’s biggest black holes grow so large. Now one astrophysicist says it’s because they feed on the quantum foam that makes up the fabric of spacetime One of the more fascinating astrophysical discoveries in recent years is that almost all galaxies hide supermassive black holes at their cores. Indeed, astronomers believe that galaxies and black holes have a kind of symbiotic relationship so that one cannot form or grow without the other. The evidence comes from observations of galaxies both near and far—almost all contain huge black holes. But that raises an interesting question. We see...
  • Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical [to] the quantum world

    09/09/2013 4:10:37 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/9/13
    Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical the quantum world 10 hours ago Enlarge Principle of the experiment: In the beginning the atom cloud is prepared in an almost perfectly ordered quantum state (symbolized by gray atoms). Over time, this quantum order is lost and disorder spreads through the system with a certain well-defined velocity (symbolized by the mixture of red and gray atoms). This disorder can be associated with the emergence of a temperature. The initial quantum properties are lost only through interactions between the atoms, without any influence from the outside world. How does a...
  • Quantum steps towards the Big Bang

    09/03/2013 5:19:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    A new approach to the unification of general theory of relativity and quantum theory Present-day physics cannot describe what happened in the Big Bang. Quantum theory and the theory of relativity fail in this almost infinitely dense and hot primal state of the universe. Only an all-encompassing theory of quantum gravity which unifies these two fundamental pillars of physics could provide an insight into how the universe began. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) in Golm/Potsdam and the Perimeter Institute in Canada have made an important discovery along this route. According to their theory,...
  • Lawrence Krauss: Quantum Computing Explained (YouTube video, 3min52sec)

    09/02/2013 7:23:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 10 replies
    Video here. (Duration: 3 minutes, 52 seconds)
  • Engage! Warp Drive Could Become Reality with Quantum-Thruster Physics

    08/24/2013 8:14:33 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Space.com ^ | 8/21/13 | Miriam Kramer
    DALLAS — Warp-drive technology, a form of "faster than light" travel popularized by TV's "Star Trek," could be bolstered by the physics of quantum thrusters — another science-fiction idea made plausible by modern science. NASA scientists are performing experiments that could help make warp drive a possibility sometime in the future from a lab built for the Apollo program at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. A warp-drive-enabled spacecraft would look like a football with two large rings fully encircling it. The rings would utilize an exotic form of matter to cause space-time to contract in front of and expand...
  • Quantum transistors at room temp

    06/24/2013 11:38:53 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 8 replies
    The Register ^ | 24 June 2013 | Richard Chirgwin
    The world might still be 20 years from the end of Moore's Law, but the hunt for technologies to replace semiconductors is going on right now. A group from Michigan Technological University is offering one such alternative: a quantum tunnelling transistor that operates at room temperature. The culmination of work begun in 2007, their demonstration has been published in Advanced Materials, here (abstract). Moore's famous observation (the number of transistors on an IC doubles roughly every two years) is one day going to run into two physical constraints: the feature size of the transistor, and its ability to dissipate heat....
  • Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years

    05/06/2013 6:00:49 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 38 replies
    Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers One of the dreams for security experts is the creation of a quantum internet that allows perfectly secure communication based on the powerful laws of quantum mechanics.The basic idea here is that the act of measuring a quantum object, such as a photon, always changes it. So any attempt to eavesdrop on a quantum message cannot fail to leave telltale signs...
  • Astrophysics: Fire in the hole! (Black hole firewalls, relativity vs. quantum mechanics)

    04/05/2013 5:46:23 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | 4/3/13 | Zeeya Merali
    n March 2012, Joseph Polchinski began to contemplate suicide — at least in mathematical form. A string theorist at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, Polchinski was pondering what would happen to an astronaut who dived into a black hole. Obviously, he would die. But how? According to the then-accepted account, he wouldn’t feel anything special at first, even when his fall took him through the black hole’s event horizon: the invisible boundary beyond which nothing can escape. But eventually — after hours, days or even weeks if the black hole was big enough — he...
  • Chinese Physicists Measure Speed of “Spooky Action At a Distance”

    03/07/2013 11:41:49 PM PST · by Bobalu · 48 replies
    Physics arXiv Blog ^ | March 7, 2013 | Physics arXiv Blog
    Einstein railed against the possibility of spooky action at a distance because it violates relativity. Now Chinese physicists have clocked it traveling more than four orders of magnitude faster than light
  • Quantum theory is wrong.

    03/07/2013 5:44:05 AM PST · by ABrit · 62 replies
    A word in your ear ^ | March 7th 2013 | Mark
    Particles do not retain "information", don't have "knowledge". It is not that the act of observation that alters reality. In fact the physical nature of the "observation" small though it may be is sufficient to alter the metrics of sub atomic particles.
  • Do we live in a computer simulation? UW researchers say idea can be tested

    12/11/2012 8:54:00 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 58 replies
    University of Washington ^ | 12/10/12 | Vince Stricherz
    A decade ago, a British philosopher put forth the notion that the universe we live in might in fact be a computer simulation run by our descendants. While that seems far-fetched, perhaps even incomprehensible, a team of physicists at the University of Washington has come up with a potential test to see if the idea holds water. The concept that current humanity could possibly be living in a computer simulation comes from a 2003 paper published in Philosophical Quarterly by Nick Bostrom, a philosophy professor at the University of Oxford. In the paper, he argued that at least one of...
  • Manipulators of the Quantum Realm Reap Nobel Glory

    10/09/2012 11:43:46 AM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 October 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Light touch. Serge Haroche and David Wineland (right) won the Nobel for their work manipulating the quantum states of individual atoms. Credit: CNRS and NIST The past couple of decades have witnessed a sea change in quantum physics. Previously, scientists relied on the strange rules of quantum theory mainly to explain the odd natural behavior of masses of atoms and other quantum particles such as photons. Increasingly, however, physicists are exploiting those rules to create delicate quantum states of individual particles and to do novel things with them. This year's Nobel Prize in physics honors two experimenters...
  • The Nobel Prize in Physics 2012 Haroche, David J. Wineland (France and USA)

    10/09/2012 3:40:47 AM PDT · by AdmSmith · 28 replies
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences ^ | 9 oct 2012 | The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2012 to Serge Haroche Collčge de France and Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France and David J. Wineland National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems" Particle control in a quantum world Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland have independently invented and developed methods for measuring and manipulating individual particles while preserving their quantum-mechanical nature, in ways that were previously thought unattainable.
  • Quantum causal relations: A causes B causes A

    10/03/2012 4:33:24 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 48 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | 10/2/12
    One of the most deeply rooted concepts in science and in our everyday life is causality; the idea that events in the present are caused by events in the past and, in turn, act as causes for what happens in the future. If an event A is a cause of an effect B, then B cannot be a cause of A. Now theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Université Libre de Bruxelles have shown that in quantum mechanics it is possible to conceive situations in which a single event can be both, a cause and an effect...
  • Scientific (Quantum) Immortality

    09/06/2012 10:51:02 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 32 replies
    The Freehold ^ | September 6, 2012 | Jonathan David Baird
    I have long been fascinated by the idea that the universe is not actually a singular object but made up of a multiverse of infinite universes. Each of these Universes is seemingly branch off at every possible action or inaction. This idea is staggering in it’s immensity. It seems like science fiction and it has certainly been a staple of science fiction for at least forty years. It may have remained science fiction but fortunately I am not alone in believing this might in fact be possible.
  • 10-year-old problem in theoretical computer science falls

    07/31/2012 11:57:26 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 17 replies
    MIT News Office ^ | 7/31/12 | Larry Hardesty
    Interactive proofs — mathematical games that underlie much modern cryptography — work even if players try to use quantum information to cheat.Interactive proofs, which MIT researchers helped pioneer, have emerged as one of the major research topics in theoretical computer science. In the classic interactive proof, a questioner with limited computational power tries to extract reliable information from a computationally powerful but unreliable respondent. Interactive proofs are the basis of cryptographic systems now in wide use, but for computer scientists, they’re just as important for the insight they provide into the complexity of computational problems. Twenty years ago, researchers showed...
  • Is Space Digital?

    02/03/2012 5:46:10 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 7 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 1/17/12 | Michael Moyer
    An experiment going up outside of Chicago will attempt to measure the intimate connections among information, matter and spacetime. If it works, it could rewrite the rules for 21st-century physicsCraig Hogan believes that the world is fuzzy. This is not a metaphor. Hogan, a physicist at the University of Chicago and director of the Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center near Batavia, Ill., thinks that if we were to peer down at the tiniest subdivisions of space and time, we would find a universe filled with an intrinsic jitter, the busy hum of static. This hum comes not from particles bouncing...
  • Here come the quantum dot TVs and wallpaper

    12/14/2011 1:12:13 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 35 replies · 2+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | 12/13/11 | Nancy Owano
    (PhysOrg.com) -- A British firm's quantum dot technology will be used for flat screen TVs and flexible screens, according to the company’s chief executive.The quantum dots will be in use for ultra thin, light flat screen TVs by the end of next year, and, in another three years, will be used in flexible screens rolled up like paper or used as wall coverings. The company, Nanoco Group, is reportedly working with Asian electronics companies to bring this technology to market. “The first products we are expecting to come to market using quantum dots will be the next generation of flat-screen...
  • Multi-purpose photonic chip paves the way to programmable quantum processors

    12/12/2011 7:57:29 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12/11/11
    Artist’s impression of the quantum photonic chip, showing the waveguide circuit (in white), and the voltage-controlled phase shifters (metal contacts on the surface). Photon pairs become entangled as they pass through the circuit. The fundamental resource that drives a quantum computer is entanglement—the connection between two distant particles which Einstein famously called 'spooky action at a distance'. The Bristol researchers have, for the first time, shown that this remarkable phenomenon can be generated, manipulated and measured entirely on a tiny silica chip. They have also used the same chip to measure mixture—an often unwanted effect from the environment, but...
  • Quantum theorem shakes foundations

    11/18/2011 5:52:08 AM PST · by ShadowAce · 86 replies
    Nature ^ | 17 November 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    At the heart of the weirdness for which the field of quantum mechanics is famous is the wavefunction, a powerful but mysterious entity that is used to determine the probabilities that quantum particles will have certain properties. Now, a preprint posted online on 14 November1 reopens the question of what the wavefunction represents — with an answer that could rock quantum theory to its core. Whereas many physicists have generally interpreted the wavefunction as a statistical tool that reflects our ignorance of the particles being measured, the authors of the latest paper argue that, instead, it is physically real. “I...
  • Quantum levitating (locking) video goes viral

    10/19/2011 7:01:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 18 October 2011 | Bob Yirka
    A video created by researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel has the Internet buzzing. Though rather simple, it just looks really cool, hence all the attention. It’s a demonstration of quantum locking, though to non-science buffs, it looks more like science fiction come to life. In the video a disc, obviously frozen due to the vapor rising from its surface hovers over a surface. This is nothing new of course, everyone’s seen it in science class. What is new is that when the demonstrator turns the disc, it stays hovered at that angle. This is in contrast to the...
  • Quantum life: The weirdness inside us

    10/08/2011 11:36:11 AM PDT · by Reeses · 30 replies
    NewScientist ^ | October 6, 2011 | Michael Brooks
    Ever felt a little incoherent? Or maybe you've been in two minds about something, or even in a bit of delicate state. Well, here's your excuse: perhaps you are in thrall to the strange rules of quantum mechanics. We tend to think that the interaction between quantum physics and biology stops with Schrödinger's cat. Not that Erwin Schrödinger intended his unfortunate feline - suspended thanks to quantum rules in a simultaneous state of being both dead and alive - to be anything more than a metaphor. Indeed, when he wrote his 1944 book What is Life?, he speculated that living...
  • Rush for rare earth may create Nebraska boomtown

    08/02/2011 5:57:55 PM PDT · by jazusamo · 51 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | August 2, 2011 | Claire Courchane
    Elk Creek, Neb. (population 112), may not be so tiny much longer. Reports suggest that the southeastern Nebraska hamlet may be sitting on the world’s largest untapped deposit of “rare earth” minerals, which have proved to be indispensable to a slew of high-tech and military applications such as laser pointers, stadium lighting, electric car batteries and sophisticated missile-guidance systems. Canada-based Quantum Rare Earths Developments Corp. last week received preliminary results from test drilling in the area, showing “significant” proportions of “rare earth” minerals and niobium. The only people more excited than Quantum? The residents of Elk Creek, where nearly one...
  • Super-Small Transistor Created: Artificial Atom Powered by Single Electrons

    04/18/2011 12:57:55 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 04-18-2011 | University of Pittsburgh
    A University of Pittsburgh-led team has created a single-electron transistor that provides a building block for new, more powerful computer memories, advanced electronic materials, and the basic components of quantum computers. The researchers report in Nature Nanotechnology that the transistor's central component -- an island only 1.5 nanometers in diameter -- operates with the addition of only one or two electrons. That capability would make the transistor important to a range of computational applications, from ultradense memories to quantum processors, powerful devices that promise to solve problems so complex that all of the world's computers working together for billions of...
  • As if Quantum Teleportation Weren't Spooky Enough, Physicists Propose 'Time Teleportation'

    01/18/2011 12:20:07 PM PST · by Nachum · 98 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 1/18/11 | Clay Dillow
    As if the idea ideas of quantum entanglement and time travel weren’t difficult enough to wrap one’s head around separately, two physicists at the Universtiy of Queensland in Australia have further compounded the headache by merging the two ideas via a new kind of quantum entanglement that links particles not across space, but across time. Quantum entanglement is that “spooky action” (Einstein’s words, not ours) that links two particles such that a measurement on one immediately influences the state of the other, even if the two particles are separated by miles, or even light years. Entanglement defies the intuitive way...
  • The Secret Financial Network Behind "Wizard" George Soros

    11/12/2010 2:50:25 AM PST · by bronxville · 66 replies
    Questions Questions Doc. ^ | November 1st, 1996 | William Engdahl
    The Secret Financial Network Behind "Wizard" George Soros by William Engdahl EIR Investigation Executive Intelligence Review (EIR), November 1, 1996 The dossier that follows is based upon a report released on Oct. 1 by EIR's bureau in Wiesbaden, Germany, titled "A Profile of Mega-Speculator George Soros." Research was contributed by Mark Burdman, Elisabeth Hellenbroich, Paolo Raimondi, and Scott Thompson. ......................................................... Time magazine has characterized financier George Soros as a "modern-day Robin Hood," who robs from the rich to give to the poor countries of eastern Europe and Russia. It claimed that Soros makes huge financial gains by speculating against western...
  • Computers set for quantum leap

    09/16/2010 4:43:02 PM PDT · by AU72 · 42 replies
    Financial Times ^ | 09/16/10 | Clive Cookson
    A new photonic chip that works on light rather than electricity has been built by an international research team, paving the way for the production of ultra-fast quantum computers with capabilities far beyond today’s devices. Future quantum computers will, for example, be able to pull important information out of the biggest databases almost instantaneously. As the amount of electronic data stored worldwide grows exponentially, the technology will make it easier for people to search with precision for what they want. EDITOR’S CHOICE Making sense of a ‘nonsensical world’ - Sep-16 Fears over computers’ impact on lives - Sep-14 Brain scan...
  • Rethinking Einstein: The end of space-time

    08/09/2010 7:25:58 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    NewScientist ^ | 8/9/10 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    Physicists struggling to reconcile gravity with quantum mechanics have hailed a theory – inspired by pencil lead – that could make it all very simpleIT WAS a speech that changed the way we think of space and time. The year was 1908, and the German mathematician Hermann Minkowski had been trying to make sense of Albert Einstein's hot new idea - what we now know as special relativity - describing how things shrink as they move faster and time becomes distorted. "Henceforth space by itself and time by itself are doomed to fade into the mere shadows," Minkowski proclaimed, "and...
  • Quantum time machine 'allows paradox-free time travel'

    07/26/2010 1:28:23 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 7/22/10 | Tom Chivers
    Quantum physicists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe it is possible to create a time machine which could affect the past without creating a "grandfather paradox".Scientists have for some years been able to 'teleport' quantum states from one place to another. Now Seth Lloyd and his MIT team say that, using the same principles and a further strange quantum effect known as 'postselection', it should be possible to do the same backwards in time. Lloyd told the Technology Review: "It is possible for particles (and, in principle, people) to tunnel from the future to the past."
  • Quantum mechanics flummoxes physicists again

    07/24/2010 5:35:11 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 82 replies · 3+ views
    Nature ^ | 7/22/10 | Jon Cartwright
    A fresh take on a classic experiment makes no progress in unifying quantum mechanics and relativity. If you ever want to get your head around the riddle that is quantum mechanics, look no further than the double-slit experiment. This shows, with perfect simplicity, how just watching a wave or a particle can change its behaviour. The idea is so unpalatable to physicists that they have spent decades trying to find new ways to test it. The latest such attempt, by physicists in Europe and Canada, used a three-slit version — but quantum mechanics won out again. In the standard double-slit...
  • Latest Physics Theories May Help Challenge Evolution

    03/30/2010 8:53:37 AM PDT · by nysuperdoodle · 85 replies · 1,787+ views
    ECR/Technology Review ^ | 30 Mar 10 | EC
    The latest theories on the nature and origin of gravity are generating lots of interest from those looking to unify the various systems (Einsteinian, Newtonian, Quantum, String Theory) of looking at our universe, and bringing to the forefront the importance of the second law of thermodynamics as an organizing principle in our universe. The problem is that the second law of thermodynamics and evolution are pretty much incompatible, as EC explains...