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Keyword: quantummechanics

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  • Fluid Tests Hint at Concrete Quantum Reality

    06/25/2014 10:17:27 AM PDT · by Reeses · 16 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | June 24, 2014 | Natalie Wolchover
    For nearly a century, “reality” has been a murky concept. The laws of quantum physics seem to suggest that particles spend much of their time in a ghostly state, lacking even basic properties such as a definite location and instead existing everywhere and nowhere at once. Only when a particle is measured does it suddenly materialize, appearing to pick its position as if by a roll of the dice. This idea that nature is inherently probabilistic — that particles have no hard properties, only likelihoods, until they are observed — is directly implied by the standard equations of quantum mechanics....
  • Scientists achieve reliable quantum teleportation for first time

    05/29/2014 5:34:05 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 75 replies
    C/NET ^ | 05/29/2014 | Nick Statt
    Albert Einstein once told a friend that quantum mechanics doesn't hold water in his scientific world view because "physics should represent a reality in time and space, free from spooky actions at a distance." That spooky action at a distance is entanglement, a quantum phenomenon in which two particles, separated by any amount of distance, can instantaneously affect one another as if part of a unified system. Now, scientists have successfully hijacked that quantum weirdness -- doing so reliably for the first time -- to produce what many sci-fi fans have long dreamt up: teleportation. No, not beaming humans aboard...
  • Researchers look beyond space and time to cope with quantum theory

    10/28/2012 8:50:13 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 78 replies
    Phys Org ^ | October 28, 2012
    Physicists have proposed an experiment that could force us to make a choice between extremes to describe the behaviour of the Universe. The proposal comes from an international team of researchers from Switzerland, Belgium, Spain and Singapore, and is published today in Nature Physics. It is based on what the researchers call a 'hidden influence inequality'. This exposes how quantum predictions challenge our best understanding about the nature of space and time, Einstein's theory of relativity. "We are interested in whether we can explain the funky phenomena we observe without sacrificing our sense of things happening smoothly in space and...
  • Astrophysics: Fire in the hole! (Black hole firewalls, relativity vs. quantum mechanics)

    04/05/2013 5:46:23 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | 4/3/13 | Zeeya Merali
    n March 2012, Joseph Polchinski began to contemplate suicide — at least in mathematical form. A string theorist at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, Polchinski was pondering what would happen to an astronaut who dived into a black hole. Obviously, he would die. But how? According to the then-accepted account, he wouldn’t feel anything special at first, even when his fall took him through the black hole’s event horizon: the invisible boundary beyond which nothing can escape. But eventually — after hours, days or even weeks if the black hole was big enough — he...
  • Ex nihilo: Dynamical Casimir effect in metamaterial converts vacuum fluctuations into real photons

    03/08/2013 2:41:26 PM PST · by Kevmo · 24 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | March 8 2013 | Stuart Mason Dambrot
    Ex nihilo: Dynamical Casimir effect in metamaterial converts vacuum fluctuations into real photons March 8, 2013 by Stuart Mason Dambrot Copyright © PNAS, doi:10.1073/pnas.1212705110 (Phys.org) —In the strange world of quantum mechanics, the vacuum state (sometimes referred to as the quantum vacuum, simply as the vacuum) is a quantum system's lowest possible energy state. While not containing physical particles, neither is it an empty void: Rather, the quantum vacuum contains fluctuating electromagnetic waves and so-called virtual particles, the latter being known to transition into and out of existence. In addition, the vacuum state has zero-point energy – the lowest quantized...
  • Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter (light sabers, anyone?)

    09/25/2013 3:40:05 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/25/13
    Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter Photons with strong mutual attraction in a quantum nonlinear medium. Harvard and MIT scientists are challenging the conventional wisdom about light, and they didn't need to go to a galaxy far, far away to do it. Working with colleagues at the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms, a group led by Harvard Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin and MIT Professor of Physics Vladan Vuletic have managed to coax photons into binding together to form molecules – a state of matter that, until recently, had been purely theoretical. The work is described in a September 25...
  • Scientists Claim That Quantum Theory Proves Consciousness Moves To Another Universe At Death

    01/17/2014 7:43:11 PM PST · by DaveMSmith · 249 replies
    A book titled “Biocentrism: How Life and Consciousness Are the Keys to Understanding the Nature of the Universe“ has stirred up the Internet, because it contained a notion that life does not end when the body dies, and it can last forever. The author of this publication, scientist Dr. Robert Lanza who was voted the 3rd most important scientist alive by the NY Times, has no doubts that this is possible.[...]The theory implies that death of consciousness simply does not exist. It only exists as a thought because people identify themselves with their body. They believe that the body is...
  • Syracuse University physicists develop model that pushes limits of quantum theory, relativity

    08/03/2010 9:56:52 AM PDT · by decimon · 8 replies · 10+ views
    Syracuse University ^ | August 2, 2010 | Judy Holmes
    All of the matter in the universe—everything we see, feel and smell—has a certain predictable structure, thanks to the tiny electrons spinning around their atomic nuclei in a series of concentric shells or atomic levels. A fundamental tenet of this orderly structure is that no two electrons can occupy the same atomic level (quantum state) at the same time—a principle called the Pauli exclusion principle, which is based on Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity and quantum theory. However, a team of Syracuse University physicists recently developed a new theoretical model to explain how the Pauli exclusion principle can be violated...
  • Research team challenges the limits of famous quantum principle

    02/08/2014 4:04:33 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | February 05, 2014 | University of Queensland
    Almost a century ago, renowned quantum theorist Werner Heisenberg found fundamental limits on how well a quantum system can be prepared and measured, known as Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. However, only the limit that pertains to the preparation of quantum systems has been quantified; the other two, relating to measurements, have long been a matter of debate, lacking a formal treatment. These limits are: That it is impossible to jointly measure incompatible quantities, for instance, location and speed of a quantum object, with perfect accuracy; and that a measurement of one of these quantities necessarily disturbs the other. Last year, UQ's...
  • Physicists scoop information from Schrodinger's cat box [Quantum Mechanics]

    01/22/2014 2:53:50 PM PST · by ETL · 86 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | January 21, 2014 | Eoin O'Carroll
    In a paper published in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature Communications and titled "Direct measurement of a 27-dimensional orbital-angular-momentum state vector," a team of physicists led by the University of Rochester's Mehul Malik describe how they circumvented a basic principle of uncertainty that requires that some states of a quantum system must be understood poorly if other states are to be understood well. Determining a quantum state, such as the position of an electron or the momentum of a photon, is tricky, to say the least. That's because subatomic particles behave nothing at all like billiard balls,...
  • Physics: Quantum quest

    09/16/2013 1:40:34 PM PDT · by neverdem · 28 replies
    Nature News ^ | 11 September 2013 | Philip Ball
    Physicists have spent a century puzzling over the paradoxes of quantum theory. Now a few of them are trying to reinvent it. If the truth be told, few physicists have ever really felt comfortable with quantum theory. Having lived with it now for more than a century, they have managed to forge a good working relationship; physicists now routinely use the mathematics of quantum behaviour to make stunningly accurate calculations about molecular structure, high-energy particle collisions, semiconductor behaviour, spectral emissions and much more. But the interactions tend to be strictly formal. As soon as researchers try to get behind the...
  • Can Quantum Mechanics Produce a Universe from Nothing?

    07/18/2013 10:36:09 AM PDT · by kimtom · 170 replies
    www.apologeticspress.org ^ | 2/1/2013 | Jeff Miller, Ph.D.
    According to the First Law of Thermodynamics, nothing in the Universe (i.e., matter or energy) can pop into existence from nothing (see Miller, 2013). All of the scientific evidence points to that conclusion. So, the Universe could not have popped into existence before the alleged “big bang” (an event which we do not endorse). Therefore, God must have created the Universe. One of the popular rebuttals by the atheistic community is that quantum mechanics could have created the Universe. In 1905, Albert Einstein proposed the idea of mass-energy equivalence, resulting in the famous equation, E = mc2 (1905). We now...
  • Relativity behind mercury's liquidity

    06/24/2013 12:56:35 AM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 June 2013 | Laura Howes
    The effects of relativity can be seen in everyday phenomena © ShutterstockWhy is mercury a liquid at room temperature? If you ask that question in a school classroom you will probably be told that relativity affects the orbitals of heavy metals, contracting them and changing how they bond. However, the first evidence that this explanation is correct has only just been published.An international team led by Peter Schwerdtfeger of Massey University Auckland in New Zealand used quantum mechanics to make calculations of the heat capacity of the metal either including or excluding relativistic effects. They showed that if they...
  • Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years

    05/06/2013 6:00:49 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 38 replies
    Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers One of the dreams for security experts is the creation of a quantum internet that allows perfectly secure communication based on the powerful laws of quantum mechanics.The basic idea here is that the act of measuring a quantum object, such as a photon, always changes it. So any attempt to eavesdrop on a quantum message cannot fail to leave telltale signs...
  • New Research Shows the Speed of Light is Variable in Real Space

    03/25/2013 11:27:40 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 20 replies
    Cleveland Leader ^ | March 25, 2013 1:33pm | Julie Kent
    Two new studies to be published in the European Physical Journal D demonstrate that the speed of light is variable in real space. Textbook explanations of the speed of light assume that light travels in a vacuum, but space is not a vacuum. … It is not expected that the small variation in the speed of light which has been found will affect the universally accepted theories of particle physics and quantum mechanics to a large extent. However, the studies are proof that the speed of light may be variable, and shows that the mathematical treatments that have long been...
  • Quantum theory is wrong.

    03/07/2013 5:44:05 AM PST · by ABrit · 62 replies
    A word in your ear ^ | March 7th 2013 | Mark
    Particles do not retain "information", don't have "knowledge". It is not that the act of observation that alters reality. In fact the physical nature of the "observation" small though it may be is sufficient to alter the metrics of sub atomic particles.
  • 1 clock with 2 times

    10/19/2011 4:45:47 PM PDT · by decimon · 13 replies
    University of Vienna ^ | October 19, 2011 | Unknown
    When quantum mechanics meets general relativityThe unification of quantum mechanics and Einstein's general relativity is one of the most exciting and still open questions in modern physics. General relativity, the joint theory of gravity, space and time gives predictions that become clearly evident on a cosmic scale of stars and galaxies. Quantum effects, on the other hand, are fragile and are typically observed on small scales, e.g. when considering single particles and atoms. That is why it is very hard to test the interplay between quantum mechanics and general relativity. Now theoretical physicists led by Prof. ÄŒaslav Brukner at the...
  • Quantum mechanics rule 'bent' in classic experiment

    06/03/2011 5:57:14 PM PDT · by decimon · 19 replies
    BBC ^ | June 3, 2011 | Jason Palmer
    Researchers have bent one of the most basic rules of quantum mechanics, a counterintuitive branch of physics that deals with atomic-scale interactions. Its "complementarity" rule asserts that it is impossible to observe light behaving as both a wave and a particle, though it is strictly both. In an experiment reported in Science, researchers have now done exactly that. They say the feat "pulls back the veil" on quantum reality in a way that was thought to be prohibited by theory. Quantum mechanics has spawned and continues to fuel spirited debates about the nature of what we can see and measure,...
  • Moving mirrors make light from nothing

    06/03/2011 11:58:13 AM PDT · by neverdem · 46 replies
    Nature News ^ | 3 June 2011 | Geoff Brumfiel
    Researchers claim to have produced sought-after quantum effect. A team of physicists is claiming to have coaxed sparks from the vacuum of empty space1. If verified, the finding would be one of the most unusual experimental proofs of quantum mechanics in recent years and "a significant milestone", says John Pendry, a theoretical physicist at Imperial College London who was not involved in the study. The researchers, based at the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, will present their findings early next week at a workshop in Padua, Italy. They have already posted a paper on the popular pre-print server...
  • Quantum time machine 'allows paradox-free time travel'

    07/26/2010 1:28:23 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 7/22/10 | Tom Chivers
    Quantum physicists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe it is possible to create a time machine which could affect the past without creating a "grandfather paradox".Scientists have for some years been able to 'teleport' quantum states from one place to another. Now Seth Lloyd and his MIT team say that, using the same principles and a further strange quantum effect known as 'postselection', it should be possible to do the same backwards in time. Lloyd told the Technology Review: "It is possible for particles (and, in principle, people) to tunnel from the future to the past."
  • Quantum mechanics flummoxes physicists again

    07/24/2010 5:35:11 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 82 replies · 3+ views
    Nature ^ | 7/22/10 | Jon Cartwright
    A fresh take on a classic experiment makes no progress in unifying quantum mechanics and relativity. If you ever want to get your head around the riddle that is quantum mechanics, look no further than the double-slit experiment. This shows, with perfect simplicity, how just watching a wave or a particle can change its behaviour. The idea is so unpalatable to physicists that they have spent decades trying to find new ways to test it. The latest such attempt, by physicists in Europe and Canada, used a three-slit version — but quantum mechanics won out again. In the standard double-slit...
  • The Destiny of the Universe

    07/17/2010 4:54:59 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies · 3+ views
    FQXI ^ | 7/2/10 | Julie Rehmeyer
    A radical reformulation of quantum mechanics suggests that the universe has a set destiny and its pre-existing fate reaches back in time to influence the past. It could explain the origin of life, dark energy and solve other cosmic conundrums.The universe has a destiny—and this set fate could be reaching backwards in time and combining with influences from the past to shape the present. It’s a mind-bending claim, but some cosmologists now believe that a radical reformulation of quantum mechanics in which the future can affect the past could solve some of the universe’s biggest mysteries, including how life arose....
  • Randomness is a Matter of Information

    04/16/2010 7:04:26 AM PDT · by mattstat · 3 replies · 175+ views
    Acin and a colleague cobbled together ytterbium atoms to produce “true” randomness, by which they mean the results of an electron being “up” or “down” cannot be predicted skillfully using any information. In their experiment, the information on the ytterbium atoms’ quantum (which means discrete!) state is not humanly accessible, so we can never do better than always guessing “up”. Brain teaser for advanced readers. Acin’s experiment generates an “up” or “down”, each occurring half the time unpredictably. Why is guessing “up” every time better than switching guesses between “up” and “dow
  • Quivering Gizmo Ushers in Quantum Machines

    03/20/2010 8:29:47 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies · 757+ views
    ScienceNOW ^ | March 17, 2010 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Springboard. This little vibrating widget has been eased into the simplest quantum state of motion. Credit: O'Connell et al., Nature, Advance Online Publication (2010) The weird rules of quantum mechanics state that a tiny object can absorb energy only in discrete amounts, or quanta, and can literally be in two places simultaneously. Those mind-bending tenets have been amply demonstrated in experiments with electrons, photons, atoms, and molecules. Ironically, though, physicists have never observed such bizarre quantum-mechanical effects in the motion of a human-made mechanical device. Now, Andrew Cleland, John Martinis, and colleagues at the University of California,...
  • Scientists supersize quantum mechanics

    03/18/2010 9:10:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 28 replies · 720+ views
    Nature ^ | 3/17/10 | Geoff Brumfiel
    Largest ever object put into quantum state.A team of scientists has succeeded in putting an object large enough to be visible to the naked eye into a mixed quantum state of moving and not moving. Andrew Cleland at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and his team cooled a tiny metal paddle until it reached its quantum mechanical 'ground state' — the lowest-energy state permitted by quantum mechanics. They then used the weird rules of quantum mechanics to simultaneously set the paddle moving while leaving it standing still. The experiment shows that the principles of quantum mechanics can apply...
  • Quivering ions pass quantum test - Table-top experiments unlock quantum realm predicted by...

    01/06/2010 9:51:25 PM PST · by neverdem · 14 replies · 824+ views
    Nature News ^ | 6 January 2010 | Zeeya Merali
    Table-top experiments unlock quantum realm predicted by Dirac equation. Trapped ions masquerading as high-speed particles have been used to confirm a bizarre 80-year-old prediction of quantum mechanics. Quantum particles racing at close to the speed of light were first predicted to jitter violently as they moved — a phenomenon known as the Zitterbewegung — in 1930, by the father of quantum mechanics, Erwin Schrödinger. The prediction was based on the Dirac equation, developed by British physicist Paul Dirac in 1928, which merges quantum mechanics with special relativity to describe how particles such as electrons behave. "The motion is particularly unexpected...
  • Looking for Life in the Multiverse

    12/18/2009 12:07:14 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 35 replies · 1,339+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 01/01/2010 | Alejandro Jenkins and Gilad Perez
    The typical Hollywood action hero skirts death for a living. Time and again, scores of bad guys shoot at him from multiple directions but miss by a hair. Cars explode just a fraction of a second too late for the fireball to catch him before he finds cover. And friends come to the rescue just before a villain’s knife slits his throat. If any one of those things happened just a little differently, the hero would be hasta la vista, baby. Yet even if we have not seen the movie before, something tells us that he will make it to...
  • The quantum life (quantum mechanics can explain many fundamental aspects of life)

    07/19/2009 5:42:44 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies · 1,259+ views
    Physics World ^ | 7/15/2009 | Paul Davies
    To a physicist, life seems little short of miraculous — all those stupid atoms getting together to perform such clever tricks! For centuries, living organisms were regarded as some sort of magic matter. Today, we know that no special “life force” is at work in biology; there is just ordinary matter doing extraordinary things, all the while obeying the familiar laws of physics. What, then, is the secret of life’s remarkable properties? In the late 1940s and 1950s it was fashionable to suppose that quantum mechanics — or perhaps some soon-to-be-formulated “post-quantum mechanics” — held the key to the mystery...
  • Physicists Put the Quantum Into Mechanics

    06/08/2009 7:43:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 40 replies · 1,401+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 5 June 2009 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge ImageSpooky connection. Physicists forged a quantum link called entanglement between the mechanical oscillations of one pair of ions and another distant pair. Credit: John Jost and Jason Amini/NIST Quantum mechanics and its bizarre rules explain the structure of atoms, the formation of chemical bonds, and the switching of transistors in microchips. Oddly, though, in spite of the theory's name, physicists have never made an actual machine whose motion captures the quirkiness of quantum mechanics. Now a group from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado, has taken a step in that direction by forging...
  • Could nanomachines give friction the slip?

    03/28/2009 12:08:25 AM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies · 620+ views
    Nature News ^ | 25 March 2009 | Philip Ball
    The quantum stickiness between very close surfaces produces no drag when they move, researchers claim.The 'sticky' Casimir force can even be repulsive.Jay Penni and Federico Capasso The quantum-mechanical effect that makes objects stick together when they are very close produces no friction when the objects are moving, two physicists claim. The results suggest that the operation of nanoscale machinery might not be as sticky a problem as feared. It's long been thought that the 'Casimir force', which pulls together two objects when they are much less than a hair's breadth apart, will create a drag force when the objects move....
  • Concept of 'hypercosmic God' wins Templeton Prize (Quantum Mechanics meets Metaphysics?)

    03/16/2009 4:29:12 PM PDT · by GOPGuide · 98 replies · 3,287+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 16 March 2009 | Amanda Gefter
    Today the John Templeton Foundation announced the winner of the annual Templeton Prize of a colossal £1 million ($1.4 million), snip D'Espagnat boasts an impressive scientific pedigree, having worked with Nobel laureates Louis de Broglie, Enrico Fermi and Niels Bohr. De Broglie was his thesis advisor; he served as a research assistant to Fermi; and he worked at CERN when it was still in Copenhagen under the direction of Bohr. snip Third view Unlike classical physics, d'Espagnat explained, quantum mechanics cannot describe the world as it really is, it can merely make predictions for the outcomes of our observations. If...
  • Atom takes a quantum leap

    01/25/2009 11:55:38 PM PST · by neverdem · 8 replies · 903+ views
    Nature News ^ | 22 January 2009 | Geoff Brumfiel
    Ytterbium ion is the first element to be teleported over a distance. Ytterbium ions have been 'teleported' over a distance of a metre.MM_photo / Alamy Researchers have teleported a single ion of the element ytterbium over a metre in distance, shattering previous records. Photons have gone further but teleportation of matter has only occurred between ions in the same trap over a few micrometers.Although still highly inefficient, their technique provides an important proof-of-principle for long-distance quantum teleportation and brings the era of quantum communication closer to reality. The work appears in the journal Science1.The spandexed crew of Star Trek has...
  • U.S. scientists learn how to levitate tiny objects

    01/08/2009 9:47:09 AM PST · by BGHater · 17 replies · 1,201+ views
    Reuters ^ | 07 Jan 2009 | Julie Steenhuysen
    U.S. scientists have found a way to levitate the very smallest objects using the strange forces of quantum mechanics, and said on Wednesday they might use it to help make tiny nanotechnology machines. They said they had detected and measured a force that comes into play at the molecular level using certain combinations of molecules that repel one another. The repulsion can be used to hold molecules aloft, in essence levitating them, creating virtually friction-free parts for tiny devices, the researchers said. Federico Capasso, an applied physicist at Harvard University in Massachusetts, whose study appears in the journal Nature, said...
  • Arguments that Prove that Climate Change is driven by Solar Activity and not by CO2 Emission

    05/26/2008 4:09:08 PM PDT · by Delacon · 45 replies · 228+ views
    Canada Free Press ^ | May 26, 2008 | Dr. Gerhard Löbert
    <p>Conveyor of a super-Einsteinian theory of gravitation that explains, among many other post-Einstein-effects, the Sun-Earth-Connection and the true cause of the global climate changes.</p> <p>As the glaciological and tree ring evidence shows, climate change is a natural phenomenon that has occurred many times in the past, both with the magnitude as well as with the time rate of temperature change that have occurred in the recent decades. The following facts prove that the recent global warming is not man-made but is a natural phenomenon.</p>
  • Written in the skies: why quantum mechanics might be wrong

    05/18/2008 10:40:38 PM PDT · by neverdem · 77 replies · 1,331+ views
    Nature News ^ | 15 May 2008 | Zeeya Merali
    Observations of the cosmic microwave background might deal blow to theory. The background patterns of space could help us focus on quantum problems.NASA / ESA / Hubble Heritage Team The question of whether quantum mechanics is correct could soon be settled by observing the sky — and there are already tantalizing hints that the theory could be wrong. Antony Valentini, a physicist at Imperial College, London, wanted to devise a test that could separate quantum mechanics from one of its closest rivals — a theory called bohmian mechanics. Despite being one of the most successful theories of physics, quantum mechanics...
  • Parallel Universes Exist - Study

    09/24/2007 4:10:41 PM PDT · by anymouse · 150 replies · 339+ views
    Parallel universes really do exist, according to a mathematical discovery by Oxford scientists described by one expert as "one of the most important developments in the history of science". The parallel universe theory, first proposed in 1950 by the US physicist Hugh Everett, helps explain mysteries of quantum mechanics that have baffled scientists for decades, it is claimed. In Everett's "many worlds" universe, every time a new physical possibility is explored, the universe splits. Given a number of possible alternative outcomes, each one is played out - in its own universe. A motorist who has a near miss, for instance,...
  • 'We have broken speed of light'

    08/16/2007 10:15:43 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 371 replies · 10,437+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 8/16/07 | Nick Fleming
    A pair of German physicists claim to have broken the speed of light - an achievement that would undermine our entire understanding of space and time. According to Einstein's special theory of relativity, it would require an infinite amount of energy to propel an object at more than 186,000 miles per second. However, Dr Gunter Nimtz and Dr Alfons Stahlhofen, of the University of Koblenz, say they may have breached a key tenet of that theory. The pair say they have conducted an experiment in which microwave photons - energetic packets of light - travelled "instantaneously" between a pair of...
  • The bees who flew too high.

    04/02/2007 5:45:35 AM PDT · by EarthBound · 77 replies · 3,709+ views
    Honeybees and Sunspots may be interacting in one of the most unwatched ballets since television was created. Metaphorically speaking of course: Imagine an aquarium containing a fish. Imagine also that you are unable to see the aquarium directly and your knowledge about it and what it contains comes from two television cameras, one directed at the aquarium’s front and the other directed at its side. As you stare at the two television monitors, you might assume that the fish on each of the screens are separate entities. After all, because the cameras are set at different angles, each of the...
  • Quantum Physics and the Media

    10/25/2005 10:44:35 PM PDT · by Logic Times · 13 replies · 572+ views
    Logic Times ^ | 10-26-05 | Dan Hallagan
    This inherent inaccuracy stems from the violent interaction of the information gatherer(s) with the event being observed, and what emerges no longer represents the actual event. The violence done during the observation phase is not a physical violence, but a disruptive, prejudicial and dysfunctional pattern of thought and action by all members of the news gathering infrastructure, from factors as well-understood as biased reporters and editors, to elements as subtle as camera angles, props, timing, tone and the selection of adjectives. The end result is that no event of any complexity can run the gauntlet of distortion erected between the...
  • Is Consciousness Quantum?

    02/12/2006 9:37:11 PM PST · by TBP · 43 replies · 505+ views
    I AM Spirit ^ | February 14, 2006 | Tim Phares, RScP
    "Consciousness is the singular for which there is no plural," wrote the scientist Erwin Schroedinger. Schroedinger, famous for his theoretical disappearing cat, was one of the pioneers of quantum science. Lately, I've been contemplating the idea, if I understand it correctly (I am emphatically NOT a scientist), that things in a quantum Universe are essentially wavicles -- potentially, at least, in several places at once, achieving locality only when observed. Only when we focus on them do they show up in a specific place called here. The essential principle is that there is an observer consciousness that is the overriding...
  • Quantum Entanglement

    Introduction These pages explain quantum entanglement by way of colourful pictures, helpful analogies, and absolutely no math. To understand quantum entanglement, several ideas and words must be explained, especially the idea of a photon. The photon is a key concept in physics, and so critical to entanglement that its behaviours must be fully understood. But before delving into the details of photons, let's take a look at the world of the very tiny, beginning with waves and atoms. What is a Wave? Tossing a pebble into a pond creates ripples that travel from where the pebble landed to the edge...
  • Quantum Leap

    07/28/2006 3:46:51 AM PDT · by Neville72 · 10 replies · 437+ views
    Fortune Magazine/CNN ^ | 7/27/2006 | Peter Schwartz & Rita Koselka
    Brain prosthetics. Telepathy. Punctual flights. A futurist's vision of where quantum computers will take us. (FORTUNE Magazine) -- She awakes early on the morning of April 10, 2030, in the capable hands of her suburban Chicago apartment. All night, microscopic sensors in her bedside tables have monitored her breathing, heart rate, and brain activity. The tiny blood sample she gave her bathroom sink last night has been analyzed for free radicals and precancerous cells; the appropriate preventative drugs will be delivered to her hotel in Atlanta this evening. It's an expensive service, but as a gene therapist, Sharon Oja knows...
  • It's official, Elvis lives [inflationary cosmology saves the King!]

    01/15/2007 6:32:55 PM PST · by snarks_when_bored · 72 replies · 1,246+ views
    Telegraph.co.uk ^ | 16 January 2007 | Marcus Chown
    It's official, Elvis lives Last Updated: 12:01am GMT 16/01/2007 It might sound a little crazy, but our standard theories of cosmology and physics suggest that an infinite number of Presleys still exist, says Marcus Chown. And if that's not scary enough, it also means that you, and these words, are repeated ad infinitum across the universeElvis is alive. No, really! He didn't die of a cardiac arrest in his bathroom at Graceland on August 16, 1977. Instead, he slipped out of the back door under cover of darkness dressed as a nun, had a sex change and worked for several years...
  • Physicists seek to put one thing in two places

    09/26/2006 4:23:06 AM PDT · by snarks_when_bored · 57 replies · 2,425+ views
    World Science ^ | 25 Sept 2006
    Physicists seek to put one thing in two placesSept. 25, 2006 Special to World Science  Physi­cists say they have made an ob­ject move just by watch­ing it. This is in­spir­ing them to a still bold­er proj­ect: put­ting a small, or­di­nary thing in­to two places at once. It may be a “fan­ta­sy,” ad­mits Keith Schwab of Cor­nell Uni­ver­si­ty in Ith­a­ca, N.Y., one of the re­search­ers. Then again, the first ef­fect seemed that way not long ago, and the sec­ond is re­lat­ed. The gray sliv­er reach­ing from top to bot­tom, slanted in the im­age, is a na­no­me­chan­i­cal re­s­o­na­tor, a sub-mi­c­ro­s­co­pic de­vice...
  • Why Quantum Mechanics Is Not So Weird after All

    09/14/2006 10:27:24 PM PDT · by snarks_when_bored · 123 replies · 4,330+ views
    Skeptical Inquirer ^ | July 2006 | Paul Quincey
    Why Quantum Mechanics Is Not So Weird after All Richard Feynman's "least-action" approach to quantum physics in effect shows that it is just classical physics constrained by a simple mechanism. When the complicated mathematics is left aside, valuable insights are gained. PAUL QUINCEY The birth of quantum mechanics can be dated to 1925, when physicists such as Werner Heisenberg and Erwin Schrödinger invented mathematical procedures that accurately replicated many of the observed properties of atoms. The change from earlier types of physics was dramatic, and pre-quantum physics was soon called classical physics in a kind of nostalgia for the...
  • Gravity's quantum leaps detected

    01/17/2002 4:06:29 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 103 replies · 1,925+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 19:00 16 January 02 | Hazel Muir
    Gravity's quantum leaps detected &nbsp; 19:00&nbsp;16&nbsp;January&nbsp;02 Hazel Muir &nbsp; Gravity's subtle influence in the quantum world has been directly observed for the first time. On tiny scales, nature makes particles behave according to curiously rigid rules. For instance, negatively charged electrons trapped around a positive nucleus under the pull of the electromagnetic force cannot have any energy they want -they have to fall into a set of distinct energy levels. In the same way, the pull of gravity should make particles fall into discrete energy levels. But because gravity is extremely weak on small scales, the effect has been ...
  • Raiders Of The Lost Dimension (quantum mechanics)

    06/06/2006 9:59:36 AM PDT · by Ben Mugged · 37 replies · 1,224+ views
    Space Mart ^ | Jun 06, 2006 | Unattributed
    A team of scientists working at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory's Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos has uncovered an intriguing phenomenon while studying magnetic waves in barium copper silicate, a 2,500-year-old pigment known as Han purple. The researchers discovered that when they exposed newly grown crystals of the pigment to very high magnetic fields at very low temperatures, it entered a rarely observed state of matter. At the threshold of that matter state--called the quantum critical point-the waves actually lose a dimension. That is, the magnetic waves go from a three-dimensional to a two-dimensional pattern. The discovery is...
  • Three cosmic enigmas, one audacious answer [bye-bye to black holes?]

    03/09/2006 8:34:42 PM PST · by snarks_when_bored · 103 replies · 2,349+ views
    New Scientist ^ | March 9, 2006 | Zeeya Merali
    Three cosmic enigmas, one audacious answer 09 March 2006 Exclusive from New Scientist Print Edition Zeeya Merali DARK energy and dark matter, two of the greatest mysteries confronting physicists, may be two sides of the same coin. A new and as yet undiscovered kind of star could explain both phenomena and, in turn, remove black holes from the lexicon of cosmology. The audacious idea comes from George Chapline, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and Nobel laureate Robert Laughlin of Stanford University and their colleagues. Last week at the 22nd Pacific Coast Gravity Meeting in Santa Barbara,...
  • A Quantum Sampler

    12/28/2005 2:23:45 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies · 963+ views
    NY Times ^ | December 26, 2005 | NA
    Thoughts on quantum theory by various scientists:"On quantum theory, I use up more brain grease than on relativity." Albert Einstein to Otto Stern in 1911"Those are the crazy people who are not working on quantum theory."Albert Einstein referring to the inmates of an insane asylum near his office in Prague, in 1911"I could probably have arrived at something like this myself, but if all this is true then it means the end of physics."Albert Einstein, referring to a 1913 breakthrough by Niels Bohr"Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood a single word."Niels Bohr"I don't like it,...
  • Quantum Trickery: Testing Einstein's Strangest Theory

    12/28/2005 1:42:38 PM PST · by snarks_when_bored · 122 replies · 2,996+ views
    The New York Times ^ | December 27, 2005 | Dennis Overbye
    December 27, 2005 Quantum Trickery: Testing Einstein's Strangest Theory By DENNIS OVERBYE Einstein said there would be days like this.This fall scientists announced that they had put a half dozen beryllium atoms into a "cat state."No, they were not sprawled along a sunny windowsill. To a physicist, a "cat state" is the condition of being two diametrically opposed conditions at once, like black and white, up and down, or dead and alive.These atoms were each spinning clockwise and counterclockwise at the same time. Moreover, like miniature Rockettes they were all doing whatever it was they were doing together, in...