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Keyword: radiocarbondating

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  • Oldest noodles unearthed in China

    10/12/2005 1:36:46 PM PDT · by bigmac0707 · 78 replies · 1,386+ views
    BBC News ^ | 9/12/05 | BBC News
    Oldest noodles unearthed in China Late Neolithic noodles: They may settle the origin debate The 50cm-long, yellow strands were found in a pot that had probably been buried during a catastrophic flood. Radiocarbon dating of the material taken from the Lajia archaeological site on the Yellow River indicates the food was about 4,000 years old. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the noodles were made using grains from millet grass - unlike modern noodles, which are made with wheat flour. The discovery goes a long way to settling the old argument over who first created the string-like food. Professor Houyuan...
  • Photos: "Body Jars," Cliff Coffins Are Clues to Unknown Tribe [ Cambodia ]

    05/19/2012 6:06:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | May 15, 2012 | John Miksic
    Skulls and other human bones poke from large ceramic jars at Khnorng Sroal, one of the newly dated mountainside burials in southwestern Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains. The bones were placed in the 20-inch-tall (50-centimeter-tall) body jars only after the bodies had decomposed or had been picked clean by scavenging animals, according to the study, which is published in the latest issue of the journal Radiocarbon. "The Cardamom highlanders may have used some form of exposure of the body to de-flesh the bones, like the 'sky burials' known in other cultures," study leader Beavan said. Placing the sky-high burials couldn't have been...
  • Modern humans 'blitzed Europe'(Radiocarbon Dating Development)

    02/23/2006 10:22:51 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies · 998+ views
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 23/02/2006 | Roger Highfield
    Our ancestors colonised Europe and wiped out their Neanderthal cousins even faster than we thought, says a study published today. Argument has raged for years about whether our ancestors from Africa outsurvived, killed or bred with the Neanderthals, who were stronger, bulkier and shorter but had equally large brains. Now developments in radiocarbon dating suggest that many of the dates published over the past 40 years are likely to underestimate the true ages of the samples. Prof Paul Mellars, of the University of Cambridge, describes today in the journal Nature how better calibration of radiocarbon ages have led to revisions...
  • Modern humans took over Europe in just 5,000 years

    02/23/2006 4:20:40 AM PST · by S0122017 · 14 replies · 1,069+ views ^ | 22 February 2006 | Michael Hopkin
    Published online: 22 February 2006; | doi:10.1038/news060220-11 Better bone dates reveal bad news for Neanderthals Modern humans took over Europe in just 5,000 years. Michael Hopkin These drawings from the Chauvet cave were originally dated to around 31,000 years ago. But a new analysis pushes that back four or five thousand years. © Nature, with permission from the French Ministry of Culture and Communication. Advances in the science of radiocarbon dating - a common, but oft-maligned palaeontological tool - have narrowed down the overlap between Europe's earliest modern humans and the Neanderthals that preceded them. Refinements to the technique, which...
  • Humans vs. Neanderthals: Game Over Earlier

    02/22/2006 10:25:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 734+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 22 February 2006 | Associated Press
    Humans and Neanderthals, thought to have coexisted for 10,000 years across the whole of Europe, are more likely to have lived at the same time for only 6,000 years, the new study suggests. Scientists believe the two species could have lived side by side at specific sites for periods of only about 2,000 years, but Mellars claims they would have lived in competition at each site for only 1,000 years... Two new studies of stratified radiocarbon in the Cariaco Basin, near Venezuela, and of radiocarbon on fossilized coral formations in the tropical Atlantic and Pacific have given scientists a better...
  • Study: Modern Humans Killed Off Neanderthals Quickly

    02/25/2006 5:11:22 AM PST · by ThreePuttinDude · 356 replies · 26,781+ views ^ | Saturday, February 25, 2006 | AP
    LONDON — Neanderthals in Europe were killed off by the advance of modern humans thousands of years earlier than previously believed, losing a competition for food and shelter, according to a scientific study published Wednesday. The research uses advances in radiocarbon dating to revise understanding of early humans, suggesting they colonized Europe more rapidly and coexisted for a much shorter period with genetic ancestors. Paul Mellars, professor of prehistory and human evolution at the University of Cambridge and author of the study, said Neanderthals — the species of the Homo genus that lived in Europe and western Asia from around...
  • Neanderthal Bone Fragment Identified in Denisova Cave

    04/02/2016 2:37:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | editors
    Scientists from the University of Oxford and the University of Manchester have used a new technique, "Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry," or ZooMS, to identify more than 2,000 bone fragments recovered from Russia's Denisova Cave. ZooMS analyzes the collagen peptide sequences in bone, which can then be used to identify its species. Among the remains of mammoths, woolly rhino, wolf, and reindeer, the researchers found one Neanderthal bone. "When the ZooMS results showed that there was a human fingerprint among the bones I was extremely excited. ...The bone itself is not exceptional in any way and would otherwise be missed by...
  • Earliest evidence of humans in Ireland

    03/21/2016 7:57:11 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | March 21, 2016
    A bear bone found in a cave may push back dates for the earliest human settlement of Ireland by 2,500 years. The bone shows clear signs of cut marks with stone tools, and has been radiocarbon dated to 12,500 years ago. This places humans in Ireland in the Palaeolithic era; previously, the earliest evidence of people came from the Mesolithic, after 10,000 years ago. The brown bear bone had been stored in a cardboard box at the National Museum of Ireland for almost a century.
  • Inside the abandoned City of Libraries

    09/02/2015 4:02:19 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 1st September 2015 | Michael Huniewicz
    'The desert city of Chinguetti, sinking ever-deeper under the sands of the Sahara, is the last place in the world you would expect to find a library. Yet this crumbling outpost in the west-African country of Mauritania is home to around 6,000 rare books and manuscripts, including some of the oldest Koranic texts in existence which date back to the 9th Century. It was once the prosperous and bustling trade centre of several 'trans-Sahara' trade routes. Traders from all over Europe, north-Africa and the Levant would stop in Chinguetti before moving on to sub-Saharan Africa. There, they would rub shoulders...
  • The Yemeni Koran

    12/14/2009 5:55:25 AM PST · by SJackson · 7 replies · 975+ views
    Frontpagemagazine ^ | 12-14-09 | Jamie Glazov/Robert Spencer/Moorthy Muthuswamy.
    Explosive ramifications result from new evidence revealing the Muslim holy book has undergone a textual evolution Frontpage Interview’s guests today are Robert Spencer and Moorthy Muthuswamy. Moorthy Muthuswamy is an expert on terrorism in India. He grew up in India, where he had firsthand experience with political Islam and jihad. He moved to America in 1984 to pursue graduate studies. In 1992, he received a doctorate in nuclear physics from Stony Brook University, New York. Since 1999 he has extensively published ideas on neutralizing political Islam’s terror war as it is imposed on unbelievers. He is the author of the...
  • Higher Criticism of the Koran Resisted

    11/02/2009 5:50:14 PM PST · by Teófilo · 13 replies · 547+ views
    Folks, Sandro Magister, the world-renowned vaticanista, hosted in his website an exchange between Muslim theologian Aref Ali Nayed and the Catholic Islamologist Michel Cuypers which I think you should read. The subject of the exchange is one that I’ve covered repeatedly in these humble folios, having to do with the need for a higher criticism of the Koran in order to know, expose, and study its literary genres, its historical context, the oral traditions that converged in its formation, and the phases in its redaction that gave us the text as we read it today. Of course, such an...
  • What is the Koran?

    11/20/2002 3:13:18 PM PST · by dennisw · 122 replies · 6,190+ views
    atlantic monthly ^ | J A N U A R Y 1 9 9 9 | Toby Lester
    J A N U A R Y   1 9 9 9Researchers with a variety of academic and theological interests are proposing controversial theories about the Koran and Islamic history, and are striving to reinterpret Islam for the modern world. This is, as one scholar puts it, a "sensitive business" by Toby Lester (The online version of this article appears in three parts. Click here to go to part two. Click here to go to part three.) N 1972, during the restoration of the Great Mosque of Sana'a, in Yemen, laborers working in a loft between the structure's inner and...
  • Brass tacks discussion on Islam

    11/18/2015 8:12:10 PM PST · by Jim Robinson · 238 replies
    Ok, let's get down to brass tacks. How long has the Islam religion been around and have they always been so hateful and violent (like so many of them are today)? I believe they claim to be direct descendants of Abraham but I also believe that Abraham was a favorite of our one true Judeo-Christian God, and was the father or grandfather of the Jewish and Christian religions. I have a hard time believing that our loving Judeo-Christian God is also the Islam God, Allah, whose Muslim followers seem to be so misplaced. Haven't the warlike Muslim tribes fanned out...

    07/23/2015 8:07:49 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 50 replies
    FrontPage Mag ^ | 07/23/2015 | Robert Spencer
    The BBC announced enthusiastically Wednesday that “what may be the world’s oldest fragments of the Koran have been found by the University of Birmingham.” This news is not only of interest to scholars and Muslim intellectuals; it appears to buttress the Islamic claim that the Qur’an’s text has remained unchanged for 1,400 years – which is purported to be proof of its divine origin. There is only one problem with all this: the BBC article raises more questions than it answers, and reveals more about the wishful thinking of the academic and media establishments than it does about the...
  • 'Oldest' Koran Fragments Found in Birmingham University

    07/22/2015 1:16:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 33 replies
    BBC News ^ | 22 July 2015 | Sean Coughlan
    What may be the world's oldest fragments of the Koran have been found by the University of Birmingham. Radiocarbon dating found the manuscript to be at least 1,370 years old, making it among the earliest in existence. The pages of the Muslim holy text had remained unrecognised in the university library for almost a century. The British Library's expert on such manuscripts, Dr Muhammad Isa Waley, said this "exciting discovery" would make Muslims "rejoice". The manuscript had been kept with a collection of other Middle Eastern books and documents, without being identified as one of the oldest fragments of the...
  • Scientists ID Head of France's King Henry IV

    12/15/2010 2:19:47 PM PST · by billorites · 31 replies ^ | December 14, 2010
    After nine months of tests, researchers in France have identified the head of France's King Henry IV, who was assassinated in 1610 aged 57. The scientific tests helped identify the late monarch's embalmed head, which was shuffled between private collections ever since it disappeared during the French Revolution in 1793. The results of the research identifying Henry IV's head were published online Wednesday in the medical journal, BMJ. Henry IV was buried in the Basilica of Saint Denis near Paris, but during the frenzy of the French Revolution, the royal graves were dug up and revolutionaries chopped off Henry's head,...
  • 6,000-year-old skeletons in French pit came from victims of violence

    12/12/2015 8:47:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Science News ^ | December 10, 2015 | Bruce Bower
    A gruesome discovery in eastern France casts new light on violent conflicts that took lives -- and sometimes just limbs -- around 6,000 years ago. Excavations of a 2-meter-deep circular pit in Bergheim revealed seven human skeletons plus a skull section from an infant strewn atop the remains of seven human arms, say anthropologist Fanny Chenal of Antea Archáologie in Habsheim, France, and her colleagues. Two men, one woman and four children were killed, probably in a raid or other violent encounter, the researchers report in the December Antiquity. Their bodies were piled in a pit that already contained a...
  • 2200 year old walrus bones suggest the most famous medieval chess set might be Icelandic in origin

    09/30/2015 1:06:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Icelandmag ^ | September 28, 2015 | staff
    Carbon dating of walrus bones found in Snæfellsnes peninsula indicates that the bones are at least 2000 years old. A large number of walrus skulls and walrus tusks have been found around Garðafjara beach on the south coast Snæfellsnes. The first skull was discovered 1884. All in all the bones of 50 walruses have been found, most in the past 50 years. Biologists argue this indicates Snæfellsnes was the home of a sizable walrus colony prior to the settlement of Iceland. Large pre-settlement colonies of walruses in Iceland A previous theory, explaining the concentration of bone discoveries, speculated they came...
  • Human Remains In Ancient Jar A Mystery

    01/26/2007 2:38:22 PM PST · by blam · 37 replies · 1,040+ views ^ | 1-26-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Human Remains in Ancient Jar a Mystery Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Jan. 23, 2007 — For over 100 years, four blue-glazed jars bearing the nametag of Rameses II (1302-1213 B.C.) were believed to contain the Egyptian pharaoh's bodily organs. But analysis of organic residues scraped from the jars has determined one actually contained an aromatic salve, while a second jar held the organs of an entirely different person who lived around 760 years later. Now the question is, who was this individual? "We do believe that the unknown person was of importance for at least two reasons," said Jacques Connan,...

    09/04/2015 8:13:47 AM PDT · by Biggirl · 50 replies ^ | September 4, 2015 | Raymond Ibrahim
    The media is abuzz with news that a portion of the Koran, which Muslims believe was first recited by their prophet, Muhammad, may actually predate Muhammad himself. Many seem to think that such news will have a large impact on the Muslim world and make Muslims rethink the veracity of their faith.
  • 'Birmingham Koran' fragment could shake Islam, carbon-dating suggests it is OLDER than Muhammad

    09/01/2015 6:46:13 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 09/01/2015 | By JENNIFER NEWTON
    The 'Birmingham Koran' fragment that could shake Islam after carbon-dating suggests it is OLDER than the Prophet Muhammad Fragments of the oldest Koran were discovered last month in BirminghamCarbon dating found the pages were produced between 568AD and 654AD But several historians now say that the parchment may predate MuhammadThey believe that this discovery could rewrite the early history of Islam Fragments of the world's oldest Koran, found in Birmingham last month, may predate the Prophet Muhammad and could even rewrite the early history of Islam, according to scholars.The pages, thought to be between 1,448 and 1,371 years old, were...
  • 17th Century Scottish Soldiers Identified from Mass Graves [Battle of Dunbar]

    09/04/2015 11:37:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, September 2, 2015 | Durham University/Scottish Soldiers Project
    In November 2013, during construction of a new café for the University's Palace Green Library, on the City's UNESCO World Heritage Site, human remains were uncovered by Durham University archaeologists who were present throughout the building work. The jumbled skeletons of at least 17 and up to 28 individuals were subsequently excavated from two burial pits (a 29th individual was not exhumed). Since then the researchers have been carrying out a wide range of tests to establish their identities. Experts initially considered that most of the evidence was consistent with the bodies being those of the Scottish soldiers but could...
  • Mesolithic site on Skye to be investigated

    09/04/2015 11:18:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    BBC ^ | 2 September 2015 | unattributed
    Excavations of a Mesolithic site on Skye could give new insights into the lives of some of the island's earliest residents. Archaeologists believe the location above Staffin Bay has the remains of a house that could be 8,000 years old. Mesolithic flints have previously been found in an area of eroded grazing land near the site. Archaeologists will work with Staffin Community Trust and volunteers in making small excavations. The University of the Highlands and Islands' Archaeology Institute will lead the investigation. Archaeologist Dan Lee said the dig at the site of "important prehistoric occupation" had "huge potential". Staffin Community...
  • Oldest Koran ‘Destabilises’ Islamic History, Scientists Say It Pre-dates Mohammed

    08/31/2015 11:22:54 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 72 replies
    Breitbart ^ | August 31, 2015 | by Nick Hallett
    Fragments of an early Koran found in a Birmingham library may rewrite Islamic history after carbon dating revealed they could be older than Mohammed.
  • Fossil-Fuel Emissions Causing Huge Impact on Radiocarbon Dating

    07/24/2015 3:56:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 45 replies ^ | Fri, 07/24/2015 - 13:26 | Gloria Bradley
    Radiocarbon dating which is used to estimate the age of every particular thing on earth is facing big threat from the fossil fuel and carbon in the atmosphere. Researchers said excess of carbon in atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuel could reduce the accuracy of Radiocarbon dating. Heather Graven, a climate-physics researcher at Imperial College London, after an analysis has found that emissions from fossil fuels are artificially raising the carbon age of the atmosphere. ... "Combustion of fossil fuels is diluting the fraction of atmospheric carbon dioxide containing radiocarbon. This is making the atmosphere appear as though it...
  • Scarlet Macaw Skeletons Point to Early Emergence of Pueblo Hierarchy

    06/23/2015 11:56:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    New work on the skeletal remains of scarlet macaws found in an ancient Pueblo settlement indicates that social and political hierarchies may have emerged in the American Southwest earlier than previously thought. Researchers determined that the macaws, whose brilliant red and blue feathers are highly prized in Pueblo culture, were persistently traded hundreds of miles north from Mesoamerica starting in the early 10th century, at least 150 years before the origin of hierarchy is usually attributed. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that the acquisition and control of macaws, along with other valued...
  • 777-Year-Old Tree Is a Babe in Muir Woods (Tallest Tree AT Muir Woods Not 1500 Yrs Old, Study Shows)

    06/01/2015 7:22:29 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 29 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Monday, June 1, 2015 | Peter Fimrite
    The tallest redwood tree in Muir Woods — a giant that was assumed to have sprouted up to 1,500 years ago in the Middle Ages — is a measly 777 years old, a puerile sprig in the hallowed halls of old growth, an analysis of tree-ring data has revealed. The study, by a Humboldt State University scientist, is the first definitive determination of the age of trees in Muir Woods. The findings by Allyson Carroll, a tree-ring specialist, mean that a 249-foot-tall coast redwood known by the lackluster name of Tree 76 sprouted seven centuries later than originally believed, at...
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • Fish based diets cause archaeological dating problems

    02/24/2015 2:46:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 25, 2013 | Bente Philippsen and Rasmus Rorbaek
    Hard water contains less Carbon-14 than the atmosphere, because dissolved carbonates are Carbon-14 free. A fish caught in hard water has thus a higher Carbon-14 age than contemporaneous terrestrial samples. If such a fish is then cooked in a ceramic pot, the radiocarbon age of the food crust will be higher than if a terrestrial animal was cooked in the pot. This is known as the “reservoir effect” because the fish’s carbon actually comes from another “reservoir” than the carbon in terrestrial animals from the surrounding area. “Reservoir age” is the difference between the true age and the Carbon-14 date......
  • History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud [2005]

    01/14/2015 9:55:35 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 47 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 01/14/2015 | Luke Harding in Berlin
    It appeared to be one of archaeology's most sensational finds. The skull fragment discovered in a peat bog near Hamburg was more than 36,000 years old - and was the vital missing link between modern humans and Neanderthals. This, at least, is what Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten - a distinguished, cigar-smoking German anthropologist - told his scientific colleagues, to global acclaim, after being invited to date the extremely rare skull. However, the professor's 30-year-old academic career has now ended in disgrace after the revelation that he systematically falsified the dates on this and numerous other "stone age" relics. Yesterday...
  • Upper Paleolithic blues: Consequences of recent dating fiasco on human evolutionary prehistory

    04/13/2005 12:07:50 PM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 21 replies · 554+ views
    Answers in Genesis ^ | 13 April 2005 | Peter Line
    Upper Paleolithic blues: Consequences of recent dating fiasco on human evolutionary prehistory by guest columnist Peter Line, Ph.D., Australia 13 April 2005 The evolutionary history of modern humans could be in for a bumpy ride following revelations that a German anthropologist, Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten, falsified dates of human remains, an act that, according to his university in Frankfurt, resulted in him being forced into retirement.1 Although the exposure of the fraud was announced in February 2005, doubts about Protsch’s work had been reported in the UK Telegraph,2 and also mentioned as a ‘news in brief’ item in Nature,3...
  • History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud

    02/21/2005 9:44:35 AM PST · by FNU LNU · 106 replies · 1,858+ views
    The Guardian ^ | February 19, 2005 | Luke Harding
    History of modern man unravels as German scholar is exposed as fraud Flamboyant anthropologist falsified dating of key discoveries Luke Harding in Berlin Saturday February 19, 2005 The Guardian It appeared to be one of archaeology's most sensational finds. The skull fragment discovered in a peat bog near Hamburg was more than 36,000 years old - and was the vital missing link between modern humans and Neanderthals. This, at least, is what Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten - a distinguished, cigar-smoking German anthropologist - told his scientific colleagues, to global acclaim, after being invited to date the extremely rare skull....
  • Anthropologist resigns in 'dating disaster'

    02/19/2005 7:36:30 AM PST · by Woodworker · 842 replies · 10,941+ views
    Worlnetdaily ^ | February 19, 2005 | unattributed
    Panel says professor of human origins made up data, plagiarized works A flamboyant anthropology professor, whose work had been cited as evidence Neanderthal man once lived in Northern Europe, has resigned after a German university panel ruled he fabricated data and plagiarized the works of his colleagues. Reiner Protsch von Zieten, a Frankfurt university panel ruled, lied about the age of human skulls, dating them tens of thousands of years old, even though they were much younger, reports Deutsche Welle. "The commission finds that Prof. Protsch has forged and manipulated scientific facts over the past 30 years," the university said...
  • Disgraced Anthropologist Drinks 40,000-Year-Old Milk (Humerus break)

    02/19/2005 7:28:21 AM PST · by InvisibleChurch · 28 replies · 2,007+ views
    Disgraced Anthropologist Drinks 40,000-Year-Old Milk by Scott Ott (2005-02-19) -- A disgraced German anthropology professor, who pretended to use carbon dating to establish a link between Neanderthals and modern man, told reporters today that he regularly drinks 40,000-year-old milk and drives a Porsche Carrera made in 736 BC. Frankfurt Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten resigned this week from a 30-year career as one of the world's leading anthropologists, when a panel concluded his carbon dating of human bones was incorrect by thousands of years. The inquiry found that one skull, which Mr. Protsch claimed came from a 27,400-year-old human fossil,...
  • Anthropologist resigns in 'dating disaster'

    02/19/2005 4:36:58 AM PST · by ovrtaxt · 40 replies · 1,233+ views ^ | February 19, 2005 | WorldNetDaily
    A flamboyant anthropology professor, whose work had been cited as evidence Neanderthal man once lived in Northern Europe, has resigned after a German university panel ruled he fabricated data and plagiarized the works of his colleagues. Reiner Protsch von Zieten, a Frankfurt university panel ruled, lied about the age of human skulls, dating them tens of thousands of years old, even though they were much younger, reports Deutsche Welle. "The commission finds that Prof. Protsch has forged and manipulated scientific facts over the past 30 years," the university said of the widely recognized expert in carbon data in a prepared...
  • Neanderthal Man 'Never Walked In Northern Europe'

    08/21/2004 7:25:32 PM PDT · by blam · 194 replies · 5,880+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-22-2004 | Tony Paterson
    Neanderthal Man 'never walked in northern Europe' By Tony Paterson in Berlin (Filed: 22/08/2004) Historians of the Stone Age fear that they will have to rip up their theories about Neanderthal Man after doubt has been cast on the carbon dating of skeletons by a leading German anthropologist. Work by the flamboyant Professor Reiner Protsch von Zieten showed that Neanderthal Man existed in northern Europe. Calculations on skeletal remains found at Hahnofersand, near Hamburg, stated they were 36,000 years old. Yet recent research at Oxford University's carbon-dating laboratory has suggested that they date back a mere 7,500 years. By that...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Second Piece of Historic Ship Discovered at WTC Site

    08/06/2011 5:14:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    DNAinfo, Digital Network Associates ^ | August 4, 2011 | Olivia Scheck
    Archaeologists helping to excavate the World Trade Center site have uncovered a second piece of the more than 200-year-old ship that was discovered there last summer. The find, made last Friday, came as workers began digging up the east side of the construction area, which once housed the World Trade Center complex... Archaeologists first noticed remnants of the ship -- curved pieces of wood buried 25 feet below street level -- last July and spent two weeks excavating the artifact, which turned out to be a 32-foot-long section of the boat's hull. The piece that was found last Friday belongs...
  • WTC Ship Gives Up Lucky Coin

    09/10/2010 7:06:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Friday, September 10, 2010 | James William
    Lucky coin? Ever since the 2nd century B.C. -- not long after Romans began minting coins -- shipbuilders have been slipping a coin into the structure of their ships. It's a tradition that continues today. In fact, the USS New York -- made partially from steel recovered from the World Trade Center towers -- did it as well (see "What is Stepping the Mast?"). For the ancient Romans it was likely a continuation of religious customs. Now it's just a tradition and done for good luck. So we didn't find it during the five days we were actually excavating it....
  • Ancient Buried Ship Found at Ground Zero Site

    07/15/2010 10:07:56 PM PDT · by AngieGal · 12 replies · 1+ views
    AOLNews ^ | 7/15/2010 | AP
    The ship was buried as junk two centuries ago - landfill to expand a bustling little island of commerce called Manhattan. When it re-emerged this week, surrounded by skyscrapers, it was an instant treasure that popped up from the mud near ground zero. A 32-foot piece of the vessel was found in soil 20 feet under street level, amid noisy bulldozers excavating a parking garage for the future World Trade Center. Near the site of so many grim finds - Sept. 11 victims' remains, twisted steel - this discovery was as unexpected as it was thrilling. Historians say the ship,...
  • Experts work to free buried ship hull at WTC site

    07/15/2010 2:38:37 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 17 replies
    hosted ^ | Jul 15
    NEW YORK (AP) -- Workers at the World Trade Center site are excavating a 32-foot-long ship hull that apparently was used in the 18th century as part of the fill that extended lower Manhattan into the Hudson River.....
  • Boat From 1700s Found At World Trade Centre

    07/15/2010 12:31:59 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 23 replies · 1+ views
    Sky News ^ | 15th July 2010 | Sky News
    'Archaeologists working at the World Trade Centre site in New York have found the remains of a wooden ship apparently buried there more than 200 years ago. The remains of the 30ft length of a wood-hulled vessel were found when workers excavating the site, where a new World Trade Centre is being built, hit a row of wood timbers, The New York Times reported.'
  • Origins of Mysterious World Trade Center Ship Revealed

    07/29/2014 5:49:18 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 27 replies
    Yahoo UK News ^ | 29th July 2014 | Megan Gannon
    'In July 2010, amid the gargantuan rebuilding effort at the site of the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, construction workers halted the backhoes when they uncovered something unexpected just south of where the Twin Towers once stood. At 22 feet (6.7 meters) below today's street level, in a pit that would become an underground security and parking complex, excavators found the mangled skeleton of a long-forgotten wooden ship. Now, a new report finds that tree rings in those waterlogged ribs show the vessel was likely built in 1773, or soon after, in a small shipyard near Philadelphia. What's more,...
  • Scientists: Bison in Illinois earlier (aren't you relieved?)

    09/03/2005 7:17:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 681+ views
    South Carolina homepage ( ^ | Tue, Aug. 30, 2005 | Associated Press
    The discovery of bison bones in Peoria County proves the animals were in Illinois about 1,700 years earlier than previously thought, according to scientists. Radiocarbon dating confirmed a group of eight bison died at a site along the Illinois River around 265 B.C., said Alan Harn, an archaeologist with Dickson Mounds Museum. Until the dating tests, scientists did not have evidence of bison in Illinois before 1450... Archaeologists also found two partial deer skeletons and two partial elk skeletons near the bison, Harn said.
  • The Latest Challenge to the Bible's Accuracy: Abraham's Anachronistic Camels?

    02/16/2014 3:48:28 PM PST · by daniel1212 · 33 replies ^ | February 14, 2014 | Gordon Govier
    Two researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) studied the bones of camels found in an area of ancient copper mines in the Aravah Valley, south of the Dead Sea. Using radiocarbon dating and other techniques, they determined that camels were first used in the mining operations near the end of the 10th century BC. They state that this is the first evidence of domesticated camels in ancient Israel. This would be almost 1,000 years later than the time of the patriarchs, when camels first appear in the Bible. Their study was quickly used to claim that the Bible was written...
  • Camel bones suggest error in Bible, archaeologists say

    02/05/2014 5:24:50 PM PST · by workerbee · 84 replies
    Fox ^ | 1/5/14
    Archaeologists from Israel’s top university have used radiocarbon dating to pinpoint the arrival of domestic camels in the Middle East -- and they say the science directly contradicts the Bible’s version of events. Camels are mentioned as pack animals in the biblical stories of Abraham, Joseph and Jacob, Old Testament stories that historians peg to between 2000 and 1500 BC. But Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University's Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures say camels weren’t domesticated in Israel until centuries later, more like 900 BC. “In addition to challenging the Bible's historicity, this anachronism is...
  • Reconstruction of ancient Slavic boat in Rugen

    10/19/2013 6:29:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Slavorum ^ | October 17, 2013 | unattributed
    A significant archaeological discovery was made in the village of Ralswiek on the legendary island of Rügen in 1967. During roadworks an excavator dug out several oak planks from the ground. The road workers took their finding to a team of archaeologists working nearby and those soon began archaeological excavations during which four ancient Slavic ships and a trading settlement was uncovered. The settlement was one of the most important ports on the Baltic coast existed the 8th century. It was proposed that Rujani (an early Slavic tribe) harboured their fleet in the place of archealogical discovery because it is...
  • New timeline for origin of ancient Egypt [RC dating of 1st dynasty]

    09/04/2013 6:17:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    BBC News ^ | September 3, 2013 | Rebecca Morelle
    A team from the UK found that the transformation from a land of disparate farmers into a state ruled by a king was more rapid than previously thought. Using radiocarbon dating and computer models, they believe the civilisation's first ruler -- King Aha -- came to power in about 3100BC... Lead researcher Dr Michael Dee, from the Research Laboratory for Archaeology at the University of Oxford, said: "The formation of Egypt was unique in the ancient world. It was a territorial state; a state from which the moment it formed had established borders over a territory in much the same...
  • ARCHAEOLOGY: New Carbon Dates Support Revised History of Ancient Mediterranean

    04/27/2006 4:59:30 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 77 replies · 2,583+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 4/28/2006 | Michael Balter
    During the Late Bronze Age, the Aegean volcanic island of Thera erupted violently, spreading pumice and ash across the eastern Mediterranean and triggering frosts as far away as what is now California. The Theran town of Akrotiri was completely buried. Tsunamis up to 12 meters high crashed onto the shores of Crete, 110 kilometers to the south, and the cataclysm may ultimately have sped the demise of Crete's famed Minoan civilization. For nearly 30 years, archaeologists have fought over when the eruption took place. Those who rely on dates from pottery styles and Egyptian inscriptions put the event at roughly...
  • Olive branch solves a Bronze Age mystery

    04/28/2006 5:59:40 AM PDT · by The_Victor · 14 replies · 737+ views
    Yahoo/MSNBC (Science) ^ | 3:04 p.m. ET April 27, 2006 | Kathleen Wren
    WASHINGTON - Compared to the well-studied world of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the civilizations that flourished in the eastern Mediterranean just before Homer’s time are still cloaked in mystery. Even the basic chronology of the region during this time has been heatedly debated. Now, a resolution has finally emerged -- initiated, quite literally, by an olive branch.Scientists have discovered the remains of a single olive tree, buried alive during a massive volcanic eruption during the Late Bronze Age. A study that dates this tree, plus another study that dates a series of objects from before, during and after the eruption,...