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Keyword: radiocarbondating

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  • Archaeology professor scrutinizes age-old mystery [ Uluburun wreck excavation]

    11/24/2008 3:39:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1,338+ views
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville ^ | Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Kayla Kitts
    In 1983 a sponge diver found funny metal biscuits with ears at the ocean floor. That is how the excavation got started, Hirschfeld said. The ship carried ten tons of copper ingots, which after being analyzed, were determined to be from Cyprus. Each ingot weighs approximately 60 pounds, she said. She and her team also excavated glass ingots, tons of tin, and three Italian swords that were not part of the cargo of the ship. Among the 130 Canaanite jars they found, there were traces of wine in the jars and one was full of glass beads. The team also...
  • Bronze Age mouse offers clues to royal shipwreck [ Ulu Burun wreck ]

    09/09/2008 12:31:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 194+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Thursday, September 4, 2008 | unattributed
    Remains of a long dead house mouse have been found in the wreck of a Bronze Age royal ship. That makes it the earliest rodent stowaway ever recorded, and proof of how house mice spread around the world. Archaeologist Thomas Cucchi of the University of Durham, UK, identified a fragment of a mouse jaw in sediment from a ship that sank 3500 years ago off the coast of Turkey. The cargo of ebony, ivory, silver and gold - including a gold scarab with the name of the Egyptian queen Nefertiti - indicates it was a royal vessel. Because the cargo...
  • Anatolian tree-ring studies are untrustworthy

    02/03/2006 8:59:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 643+ views
    The Limehouse Cut ^ | 30 October 2005 | Douglas J. Keenan
    The approach that was adopted for Anatolia, however, was to rely largely on what is called a "D-score". The D-score does not exist in statistics. It has been used solely with tree rings. D-scores do not have a mathematical derivation -- unlike t-scores, g-scores, and times series. In fact, D-scores were more or less just made up (in an unpublished 1987 thesis), and using them to evaluate a tree-ring match turns out to be little better than rolling dice... The most important of those dates was perhaps for wood from a shipwreck, which was claimed to resolve some of the...
  • Ancient Tree With Record of Earth's Magnetic Field Reversal in Its Rings Discovered

    07/15/2019 9:21:19 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 93 replies
    Newsweak ^ | Thursday, July 4, 2019 | Hannah Osborne
    An ancient tree that contains a record of a reversal of Earth's magnetic field has been discovered in New Zealand. The tree -- an Agathis australis, better known as its M&Ccedilori name kauri -- was found in Ngawha, on New Zealand's North Island, during excavation work for the expansion of a geothermal power plant, stuff.nz reports. The tree, which had been buried in 26 feet of soil, measures eight feet in diameter and 65 feet in length. Carbon dating revealed it lived for 1,500 years, between 41,000 and 42,500 years ago... The lifespan of the kauri tree covers a point...
  • Some Reservations about the Newport Tower C-14 Dates (The Newport Tower mystery)

    06/02/2019 12:31:15 AM PDT · by vannrox · 17 replies
    ASC Ohio State University ^ | August 2001 | J. Huston McCulloch
    Some Reservations about the Newport Tower C-14 Dates</h1><p> </p><h2>J. Huston McCulloch</h2><p> August, 2001 </p><p> This paper was published in the <i> Midwestern Epigraphic Journal</i>, Vol. 15, 2001, pp. 79-92.</p><p> </p></center> In a widely cited 1997 paper, Johannes Hertz raises a number of arguments against a pre-Colonial origin for the famous <a href="http://www.redwood1747.org/tower/millmenu.htm">Newport, Rhode Island Stone Tower</a>. Hertz insists that it was modeled after the 17th century Chesterton Mill in Warwickshire, England, and points out that a 1948-9 survey by Hugh Hencken and William S. Godfrey found indisputably colonial artifacts at the bottom of a trench that surrounds the foundations. He...
  • Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc

    05/14/2019 3:29:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 9, 2019 | CNRS
    The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the Col du Dôme of the Mont Blanc glacier in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era. Published in Geophysical Research Letters, the study, led by an international team and coordinated by a CNRS scientist at the Institute for Geosciences and Environmental Research (IGE)(CNRS/IRD/UGA/Grenoble INP)*, reveals significant atmospheric pollution from heavy metals: the presence of lead and antimony (detected in ancient alpine ice for the first time here) is linked to mining activity and lead and silver production by the ancient Romans, well before...
  • A 2,624-Year-Old Tree Has Just Been Found Growing in a Swamp in America

    05/10/2019 2:33:53 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 53 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 10 May 2019 | MICHELLE STARR
    Along the Black River in North Carolina, bald cypress trees have been quietly growing for millennia. Quite literally so: Scientists recently found trees over 2,000 years old - including one that is at least 2,624 years old. Another nearby tree was found to be 2,088 years old - and geoscientists believe that more bald cypresses (Taxodium distichum) in the Three Sisters Swamp could be the same age or even older. Surprisingly, a tree named BLK227 was found to be at least 2,624 years old. That makes it a seedling or sapling in 605 BCE - a timeframe that predates the...
  • "Off the Richter Scale" (Huge Predicted West Coast Earthquakes)

    03/13/2019 9:37:20 AM PDT · by Sarcasm Factory · 98 replies
    City Journal ^ | Winter 2019 | Michael J. Totten
    Americans have long dreaded the “Big One,” a magnitude 8.0 earthquake along California’s San Andreas Fault that could one day kill thousands of people and cause billions of dollars in damage. The Big One, though, is a mere mini-me compared with the cataclysm forming beneath the Pacific Northwest. Roughly 100 miles off the West Coast, running from Mendocino, California, to Canada’s Vancouver Island, lurks the Cascadia Subduction Zone, where the Juan de Fuca Plate is sliding beneath the North American Plate, creating the conditions for a megathrust quake 30 times stronger than the worst-case scenario along the notorious San...
  • Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old

    09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · by blam · 90 replies · 3,344+ views
    Sunday Gazette Mail ^ | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
    Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN — The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeleton’s teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
  • Giant Siberian Rhinoceros Lived alongside Early Modern Humans

    11/29/2018 10:37:04 AM PST · by ETL · 11 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Nov 28, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    For a long time it was believed that a giant rhinoceros called Elasmotherium sibericum went extinct around 200,000 years ago — well before the Quaternary megafaunal extinction event, which saw the end of the woolly mammoth, Irish elk and saber-toothed cat. Now improved dating of fossils suggests that the species survived in Eastern Europe and Central Asia until at least 39,000 years ago, overlapping in time with the existence of early modern humans. Today there are just five surviving rhinoceros species, although in the past there have been as many as 250 species at different times.Weighing up to 3.5 tons, Elasmotherium...
  • 'Siberian unicorn' walked Earth with humans

    11/27/2018 1:15:48 PM PST · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/27/2018 | By Helen Briggs
    A giant rhino that may have been the origin of the unicorn myth survived until at least 39,000 years ago - much longer than previously thought. Known as the Siberian unicorn, the animal had a long horn on its nose, and roamed the grasslands of Eurasia. New evidence shows the hefty beast may have eventually died out because it was such a picky eater. Scientists say knowing more about the animal's extinction could help save the remaining rhinos on the planet. Rhinos are in particular danger of extinction because they are very picky about their habitat, said Prof Adrian Lister...
  • Hunters present in North America 800 years earlier than previously thought: DNA analysis

    10/20/2011 12:18:28 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 20 OCT 2011 | Provided by Texas A&M University
    The tip of a bone point fragment found embedded in a mastodon rib from an archaeological site in Washington state shows that hunters were present in North America at least 800 years before Clovis, confirming that the first inhabitants arrived earlier to North America than previously thought, says a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University archaeologist. Michael Waters, director of the Center for the Study of the First Americans in the Department of Anthropology at Texas A&M, and colleagues from Colorado, Washington and Denmark believe the find at the Manis site in Washington demonstrates that humans were...
  • Scarlet macaw DNA points to ancient breeding operation in Southwes

    08/13/2018 7:37:17 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    phys.org ^ | August 13, 2018, | Pennsylvania State University
    Historically, scarlet macaws lived from South America to eastern coastal Mexico and Guatemala, thousands of miles from the American Southwest. Previously, researchers thought that ancestral Puebloan people might have traveled to these natural breeding areas and brought birds back, but the logistics of transporting adolescent birds are difficult. None of the sites where these early macaw remains were found contained evidence of breeding—eggshells, pens or perches. "We were interested in the prehistoric scarlet macaw population history and the impacts of human direct management," said George. "Especially any evidence for directed breeding or changes in the genetic diversity that could co-occur...
  • New Technique Provides Accurate Dating of Ancient Skeletons

    06/21/2018 4:09:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | June 17, 2018 | European Society of Human Genetics
    Interest in the origins of human populations and their migration routes has increased greatly in recent years. A critical aspect of tracing migration events is dating them. However, the radiocarbon techniques*, that are commonly used to date and analyse DNA from ancient skeletons can be inaccurate and not always possible to apply. Inspired by the Geographic Population Structure model that can track mutations in DNA that are associated with geography, researchers have developed a new analytic method, the Time Population Structure (TPS), that uses mutations to predict time in order to date the ancient DNA. Dr Umberto Esposito... TPS can...
  • Study: Radiocarbon Dating Inaccurate in the Holy Land

    The analysis was made by comparing Jordanian juniper trees that grew between roughly 1600 and 1910 A.D., according to the researchers... The researchers results indicated that, like in many other parts of the globe, the growing season fluctuates enough to tilt the results. Thus, the traditional Carbon-14 calibration curve for the Northern Hemisphere is not entirely accurate for southern Jordan, Israel and Egypt. The offset averages about 19 years, the researchers said... The paper contends that massive timeline restructuring could be in the offing, for events both major and minor. “Although, overall, the Carbon-14 offset identified here produces what may...
  • The Study You Won’t Be Hearing About: No Impact On Groundwater From Fracking

    05/11/2018 8:48:28 PM PDT · by MarvinStinson · 11 replies
    hotair ^ | May 10, 2018 | JAZZ SHAW
    Protests by environmentalists against hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) have been going on for years now, along with the Hollywood efforts of serial fabulists such as Josh Fox. One of the biggest concerns surrounding the process is the possibility of contamination of groundwater. While a previous study in Pennsylvania by the state Department of Environmental Protection revealed zero instances of this happening (except for surface spills during transport of hydraulic fluids), critics discounted the study and the protests continued. Now a different study conducted in Ohio on the Utica shale play has been completed and published. They were looking for evidence...
  • Dogs lived and died with humans 10,000 years ago in the Americas

    04/17/2018 5:40:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 37 replies
    Science News ^ | April 16, 2018 | Bruce Bower
    A trio of dogs buried at two ancient human sites in Illinois lived around 10,000 years ago, making them the oldest known domesticated canines in the Americas. Radiocarbon dating of the dogs’ bones shows they were 1,500 years older than thought, zooarchaeologist Angela Perri said April 13 at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The previous age estimate was based on a radiocarbon analysis of burned wood found in one of the animals’ graves. Until now, nearly 9,300-year-old remains of dogs eaten by humans at a Texas site were the oldest physical evidence of American canines.
  • Unusual climate during Roman times plunged Eurasia into hunger and disease

    04/15/2018 6:41:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    Science News ^ | April 11, 2018 | University of Helsinki
    A recent study indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid 500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period. A joint research project of the Chronology Laboratory of the Finnish Museum of Natural History and Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) suggests that the years 536 and 541-544 CE were very difficult... An extended period of little light may make it difficult for humans to survive. The level of production of plants is dependent on the amount of available sunlight. Food production, i.e, farming and animal husbandry, rely on the same solar energy. Humans, meanwhile, become more prone to disease if...
  • How Hannibal's crossing of the Alps with 30,000 soldiers was even harder than first thought

    02/18/2018 8:40:47 AM PST · by mairdie · 45 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 17 February 2018 | Claudia Joseph
    How Hannibal's crossing of the Alps with 30,000 soldiers was even harder than first thought as researchers find he took a perilous route on a narrow bridle path 9,500ft above sea level ****** Soil containing traces of horse manure has been carbon dated to 218BC, the time of HannibalÂ’s crossing, and shows that he took the Col de la Traversette, a narrow bridle path 9,500ft above sea level that links the Guil Valley in France with the Po Valley in Italy. Previous speculation that he took this direct route had been discounted because of its sheer difficulty, with gradients as...
  • Did Abraham Lincoln sleep here?

    02/11/2018 11:40:26 AM PST · by bgill · 34 replies
    cbs ^ | Feb. 11, 2018 | cbs
    Visitors to a small log cabin in Kentucky are right to ask: Is it true that Abraham Lincoln slept here? On the eve of Lincoln's 209th birthday tomorrow, Brook Silva-Braga has the answer... "What we're trying to do is authenticate when this cabin was made by using the tree rings in the logs," he replied. Some say our 16th president, born in these hills in 1809, spent some of his childhood in this cabin at Knob Creek. But did he?... So no, Abraham Lincoln did not sleep here in the Knob Creek cabin … or in the "symbolic cabin" at...