Keyword: rareearth

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  • North Dakota coal studying supply of valuable rare earth elements

    07/18/2017 2:21:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    The Bismark Tribune ^ | July 4, 2017 | Jessica Holdman
    North Dakota coal companies are hoping to have a hand in solving the nation’s supply problem of rare earth elements. Europium, dysprosium, erbium, terbium, neodymium, holmium, scandium, lutetium, and yttrium, are just a few of these valuable materials. “They’re used in pretty much all of our modern electronics,” said Steve Benson, associate vice president for research at the Energy and Environmental Research Center in Grand Forks. Magnets, hard drives, alloys, batteries, catalysts in cars, lasers, even coal’s cleaner energy cousins wind turbines and solar panels rely on rare earth elements - and could, in turn, rely on lignite coal. And...
  • Bond: Retiring but still not shy

    12/26/2010 3:23:12 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies · 1+ views
    The St. Louis Post-Dispatch ^ | December 26, 2010 | Bill Lambrecht
    Sen. Christopher "Kit" Bond isn't going quietly. In his final days as a U.S. senator before retiring, Bond marched repeatedly to the Senate floor to deliver policy addresses on matters ranging from energy to national security to global trade. He even made a speech entitled "Rare Earth," a lesson on the strategic value of metallic elements in Missouri's soil. He recently introduced a bill to spend $50 million to secure a rare earth supply chain — even though he won't be in the Senate to shepherd it. On Dec. 14, Bond, R-Mo., stood to deliver his farewell address, a panoramic...
  • US coal ash highly rich in rare earths, scientists find

    05/31/2016 3:41:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    Mining ^ | May 30, 2016 | Cecilia Jamasmie
    US scientists have found what it could be key for the future of the country’s ailing coal industry as they detected that ashes from local operations, particularly those around the Appalachian region, are very rich in rare earth elements. Researchers from North Carolina-based Duke University analyzed coal ashes from coal-fired power plants throughout the US, including those in the largest coal-producing regions: the Appalachian Mountains; southern and western Illinois; and the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. One of the team main conclusions was that coal waste generated by the Appalachian coal operations was the richest in rare earth...
  • Astrobiology Top 10: Earth's Moon May Not Be Critical to Life

    12/25/2015 12:03:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Astrobiology ^ | Wednesday, December 23, 2015 | Keith Cooper
    In 1993, French astronomer Jacques Laskar ran a series of calculations indicating that the gravity of the Moon is vital to stabilizing the tilt of our planet. Earth's obliquity, as this tilt is technically known as, has huge repercussions for climate. Laskar argued that should Earth's obliquity wander over hundreds of thousands of years, it would cause environmental chaos by creating a climate too variable for complex life to develop in relative peace. So his argument goes, we should feel remarkably lucky to have such a large moon on our doorstep, as no other terrestrial planet in our solar system...
  • New US space mining law to spark interplanetary gold rush

    12/08/2015 11:11:12 AM PST · by simpson96 · 36 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 12/8/2015 | Luc Olinga
    Flashing some interplanetary gold bling and sipping "space water" might sound far-fetched, but both could soon be reality, thanks to a new US law that legalizes cosmic mining.In a first, President Barack Obama signed legislation at the end of November that allows commercial extraction of minerals and other materials, including water, from asteroids and the moon. That could kick off an extraterrestrial gold rush, backed by a private aeronautics industry that is growing quickly and cutting the price of commercial space flight. The US Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act of 2015 says that any materials American individuals or companies find...
  • Solar system may be one of a kind

    08/05/2004 10:56:29 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 109 replies · 1,892+ views
    Reuters ^ | Thursday, August 5, 2004
    Our solar system may be unique after all, despite the discovery of at least 120 other systems with planets, astronomers said on Wednesday. All the other solar systems that have been found have big, gassy planets circling too close to their stars to allow them to be anything like Earth or its fellow planets, the British and U.S.-based researchers said. If that is the case, Earth-like planets will be very rare, the astronomers write in the latest issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. "Maybe these other extrasolar systems ... contain only the giant planets," said Mario...
  • Smart phone ingredient found in plant extracts

    09/07/2015 8:41:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    Reuters ^ | September 7, 2015
    HIRSCHFELD, GERMANY - Scientists in Germany have come up with a method for extracting the precious element germanium from plants. The element is a semi-conductor and was used to develop the first transistor because it is able to transport electrical charges extremely quickly. Nowadays, silicon-germanium alloy is indispensable to modern life, crucial in making computers, smartphones and fiber-optic cables. Transparent in infra-red light, germanium is also used in intelligent steering systems and parking sensors for vehicles. Yet although germanium is present in soil all over the world, it is difficult to extract, and most supplies currently come from China. Now...
  • Free Markets Smash Chinese Rare Earth Minerals Monopoly

    01/17/2015 8:26:32 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    The Daily Signal ^ | January 16, 2015 | William Wilson
    Last week China announced that it would adhere to a World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling from last year by removing export quotas among other restrictions on rare earth minerals (RE). After controlling the global market for a number of years and extracting handsome rents, why is Beijing suddenly deciding to comply? It probably has little to do with the Chinese deciding to play by the rules and more to do with the realization that their attempt to use their dominant position to coerce political concessions has backfired. China’s monopoly of RE production has been quickly slipping away due to market...
  • Rare Earth Metals Were Supposed To Be The 'Can't-Lose' Investment — Look How That Turned Out

    09/16/2014 9:53:05 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 18 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 09/16/2014 | Myles Udland
    Shares of rare earth mining company Molycorp are down more than 70% in 2014. But the decline of Molycorp began quickly and brutally in 2011. Molycorp went public in July 2010 at $14 per share, right as the price of rare earth minerals started to take off. The price of Molycorp shares quintupled within a year, and peaked at $74 in 2011. But over the last three years, the stock has been on a steady march towards $0. The 2010 surge in rare earth prices prompted ZeroHedge to write: "Ever heard of the oxides of Lanthanum, Cerium, Neodymium, Praseodymium and/or...
  • NASA is now accepting applications from companies that want to mine the moon

    02/12/2014 12:38:55 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    The Verge ^ | February 9, 2014 | Adrianne Jeffries
    NASA is now working with private companies to take the first steps in exploring the moon for valuable resources like helium 3 and rare earth metals. Initial proposals are due tomorrow for the Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown program (CATALYST). One or more private companies will win a contract to build prospecting robots, the first step toward mining the moon. The contract will be a "no funds exchanged" Space Agreement Act, which means the government will not be directly funding the effort, but will receive NASA support. Final proposals are due on March 17th, 2014. NASA has...
  • Blunt, Manchin Introduce Bill To Encourage Domestic Production Of Rare Earth Minerals

    02/09/2014 8:08:08 AM PST · by Kolath · 10 replies
    Senator Blunt ^ | 02/07/2014 | Senator Roy Blunt
    WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.) and U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (W. Va.) introduced the “National Rare Earth Cooperative Act of 2014” this week, bipartisan legislation that relieves America’s dependence on China’s rare earth minerals, encourages private sector jobs and innovation, and preserves our the United States’ military technological edge. To read the bill, click this link: http://www.blunt.senate.gov/public/_cache/files/8385bd2e-0063-48eb-85ed-ab19dc713c55/2-7-14%20National%20Rare%20Earth%20Cooperative%20Act%20of%202014.pdf
  • China Again Deploys The Rare Earth Weapon

    01/09/2014 8:33:03 AM PST · by Lower Deck · 15 replies
    Strategy Page ^ | 1/9/14 | Anonymous
    The U.S. Department of Defense recently granted the manufacturer of the new F-35 fighter a waiver for having some illegal Chinese components in newly built F-35s. The cheap Chinese components were nothing exotic; they were $2 magnets and stuff like that. These items inadvertently got into the supply chain as a Japanese subcontractor built parts of the aircraft. An audit later discovered the Chinese parts. The manufacturer told the Department of Defense that it would cost over $10 million and weeks, if not months, to take apart the offending assemblies, replace the Chinese items with American ones and reassemble, test...
  • Greenland votes to allow uranium, rare earths mining

    10/25/2013 11:22:23 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 6 replies
    EurActiv ^ | Thu Oct 24, 2013 5:19pm EDT | (with Reuters)
    Greenland’s parliament voted on Thursday (24 October) to end a decades-long prohibition on mining for radioactive materials like uranium, further opening up the country to investors from Australia and China eager to tap its vast mineral resources. The move will not only allow the mining of uranium deposits, but also of rare earths, minerals used in 21st century products from wind turbines to hybrid cars and smart phones and that are currently mostly extracted by China. With sea ice thawing and new Arctic shipping routes opening, the former Cold War ally of the West has emerged from isolation and gained...
  • Japan gains right to search for rare metals on high seas

    07/22/2013 6:08:50 PM PDT · by TexGrill · 10 replies
    Japan News ^ | 07/23/2013 | Yomiuri Shimbun
    The Yomiuri Shimbun Japan has obtained exclusive mineral exploration rights for rare metals and other resources on the seabed about 600 kilometers southeast of Tokyo’s Minami-Torishima island. It is the first time in 26 years that Japan has obtained mineral exploration rights on the high seas. In an announcement Saturday, the Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry said it would begin full-fledged exploration next fiscal year at the earliest. To obtain exclusive exporation rights, a nation must first gain the approval of the United Nations’ International Seabed Authority. The U.N. authority gave its approval Friday, and the government is expected to...
  • Rush to find gold rush-era discards that could fuel cellphones, TVs

    07/21/2013 5:59:40 PM PDT · by jazusamo · 14 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 21, 2013 | AP
    Across the West, early miners digging for gold, silver and copper had no idea that one day something else very valuable would be buried in the piles of dirt and rocks they tossed aside. There's a rush in the U.S. to find key components of cellphones, televisions, weapons systems, wind turbines, MRI machines and the regenerative brakes in hybrid cars, and old mine tailings piles just might be the answer. They may contain a group of versatile minerals the periodic table called rare earth elements. "Uncle Sam could be sitting on a gold mine," said Larry Meinert, director of the...
  • I learned something interesting about the moon and the earth + climate(vanity)

    01/16/2012 1:51:34 AM PST · by Ancient Drive · 47 replies · 1+ views
    I was watching this program about the moon and the important role it plays on stabilizing earth. One of the things it does is keep it from wobbling all over the place. It keeps the earth fairly balanced, but every now and then the planet tilts 5 degrees up or down causing massive climatic changes. The last tilt turned what we now know as the Sahara desert from a lush green forest with rivers into the pile of sand it is today. So I'm thinking ok.. we have these tilts every now and then let's not forget solar flares +...
  • China 'stockpiling rare earths for strategic reserves'

    07/05/2012 12:37:03 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 12 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6:10AM BST 05 Jul 2012 | (AFP)
    China has started stockpiling rare earths for strategic reserves, a state-backed newspaper said, in a move which may raise more worries over Beijing's control of the coveted resources. China has already started the purchase—using state funds—and storage of rare earths for strategic reserves, the China Securities Journal said, but did not say exactly when the initiative was launched. The country produces more than 90 percent of the world's rare earths, which are used in high-tech equipment ranging from iPods to missiles, and it has set production caps and export quotas on them. Major trading partners last month asked the World...
  • Hitachi unveils motor without 'rare earths'

    04/12/2012 5:48:31 AM PDT · by Abathar · 24 replies
    AFP ^ | 04/11/2012 | uncredited
    TOKYO — Japanese high-tech firm Hitachi Wednesday unveiled an electric motor that does not use "rare earths", aiming to cut costs and reduce dependence on imports of the scarce minerals from China. The prototype 11 kilowatt motor does not use magnets containing rare earths and is expected to go into commercial production in 2014, the company said. Hitachi started work on the project on 2008. Other Japanese firms, including automaker Toyota, have been working towards the same goal, spurred on by high prices of the minerals. Permanent magnet motors usually contain rare earth such as neodymium and dysprosium and are...
  • Thorium, Heavy Rare Earths, China & the Loss of Manufacturing Jobs

    10/15/2011 5:44:18 PM PDT · by Errant · 23 replies
    Youtube ^ | 10 Oct 2011 | thoriumremix
    Thorium policy in all western nations undermines the successful development of a domestic rare earth market. All of the rare earths that most western mining companies are willing to process are what they call bastnasites or carbonatites. They select these rare earths not because of the high ratios of rare earths but simply the absence of thorium. Manufacturers using rare earth elements in their products are relocating their manufacturing base inside China. The jobs in manufacturing transfer from the United States and western Europe into the Chinese mainland.
  • Huge rare earth deposits found in Pacific: Japan experts

    07/03/2011 9:32:09 PM PDT · by Enchante · 24 replies
    Reuters via Yahoo News ^ | 07/04/2011 | Reuters Staff
    TOKYO (Reuters) – Vast deposits of rare earth minerals, crucial in making high-tech electronics products, have been found on the floor of the Pacific Ocean and can be readily extracted, Japanese scientists said on Monday.