Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $51,220
58%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 58%!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: regenerativemedicine

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Cells Reprogrammed in Living Mice

    09/12/2013 6:34:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 2013-09-11 | Gretchen Vogel
    Sagrario Ortega/Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), MadridPregnant with possibilities. Cells reprogrammed in living mice (green) can contribute to both the placenta and body tissues of a developing mouse. Cells Reprogrammed in Living Mice Researchers have discovered a surprisingly effective way to “reprogram” mature mouse cells into an embryolike state, able to become any of the body’s cell types. Their recipe: Let the transformation happen in a living animal instead of a petri dish. The finding could help scientists better understand how reprogramming works and it may one day help breed replacement tissues or organs in the lab—or in patients.In...
  • Computational biology: Cells reprogrammed on the computer

    08/01/2013 4:37:41 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | July 31, 2013 | NA
    Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have developed a model that makes predictions from which differentiated cells – for instance skin cells – can be very efficiently changed into completely different cell types – such as nerve cells, for example. This can be done entirely without stem cells. These computer-based instructions for reprogramming cells are of huge significance for regenerative medicine. The LCSB researchers present their results today in the prestigious scientific journal Stem Cells. This is the first paper based solely on theoretical, yet practically proven, results of computational biology to...
  • Press P to print

    07/23/2013 11:17:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 25 June 2013 | Katharine Sanderson
    The use of 3D printers to create lab equipment, deliver reagents and even build biomaterials is on the rise. Katharine Sanderson installs drivers and prints away © Frank WojciechowskiThe latest piece of cool technology at the top of every self-confessed geek’s wish list is quite likely to be a 3D printer. Who wouldn’t want the wherewithal to print a range of gadgets on a whim, from plastic toys to a spare pair of glasses or even pizza? And now seems like the perfect time to splash out on your own 3D printer: companies like MakerBot are selling 3D printers...
  • Tissue engineering: How to build a heart

    07/04/2013 2:23:05 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    Nature News ^ | 03 July 2013 | Brendan Maher
    With thousands of people in need of heart transplants, researchers are trying to grow new organs. Doris Taylor doesn't take it as an insult when people call her Dr Frankenstein. “It was actually one of the bigger compliments I've gotten,” she says — an affirmation that her research is pushing the boundaries of the possible. Given the nature of her work as director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, Taylor has to admit that the comparison is apt. She regularly harvests organs such as hearts and lungs from the newly dead, re-engineers them starting from...
  • Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young

    05/15/2013 2:09:10 PM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 May 2013 | Paul Gabrielsen
    Enlarge Image Young at heart. Cross-sections of mouse ventricles show the visible change in size when old hearts are immersed in young blood. Credit: Francesco Loffredo It's time to turn back the clock on an aging ticker. Drawing on an odd experimental technique invented more than a century ago but rarely done now, researchers have found that a blood-borne protein makes old mouse hearts appear young and healthy again. It's not clear yet whether humans would react the same way, but scientists are hopeful that this discovery may help treat one of the heart's most frustrating ailments. "This is probably...
  • Printable 'bionic' ear melds electronics and biology

    05/08/2013 2:44:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | May 1, 2013 | NA
    Scientists used 3-D printing to merge tissue and an antenna capable of receiving radio signals.Scientists at Princeton University used off-the-shelf printing tools to create a functional ear that can "hear" radio frequencies far beyond the range of normal human capability. The researchers' primary purpose was to explore an efficient and versatile means to merge electronics with tissue. The scientists used 3D printing of cells and nanoparticles followed by cell culture to combine a small coil antenna with cartilage, creating what they term a bionic ear. "In general, there are mechanical and thermal challenges with interfacing electronic materials with biological materials,"...
  • Lab-grown kidneys transplanted into rats

    04/16/2013 7:16:05 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    Nature News ^ | 14 April 2013 | Ed Yong
    Engineered organs produce urine, though not as efficiently as natural ones. Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have fitted rats with kidneys that were grown in a lab from stripped-down kidney scaffolds. When transplanted, these 'bioengineered' organs starting filtering the rodents’ blood and making urine. The team, led by organ-regeneration specialist Harald Ott, started with the kidneys of recently deceased rats and used detergent to strip away the cells, leaving behind the underlying scaffold of connective tissues such as the structural components of blood vessels. They then regenerated the organ by seeding this scaffold with two cell types: human...
  • Scam Cell - California’s embryonic stem-cell research institute fails to deliver.

    03/23/2013 4:52:19 PM PDT · by neverdem · 24 replies
    City Journal ^ | 14 March 2013 | LLOYD BILLINGSLEY
    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state’s controversial, $3 billion stem-cell research agency, has yet to follow recommendations from a December report by the Institute of Medicine, a division of the National Academy of Sciences. The report, which urged the agency to overhaul its board of directors, did not fully convey the magnitude of CIRM’s failure—but it did confirm that CIRM might be better described as Conflict of Interest Research Money. Almost all members of the CIRM board, investigators noted, “are interested parties with a personal or financial stake in the allocation of CIRM fundings.” In fact, CIRM directed...
  • Painkillers mobilize blood stem cells

    03/14/2013 9:26:32 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    Nature News ^ | 13 March 2013 | Thea Cunningham
    Aspirin-related drugs suggest a way towards more effective stem-cell transplants. Aspirin-like drugs could improve the success of stem-cell transplants for patients with blood or bone-marrow disorders, a study suggests. The compounds coax stem cells from bone marrow into the bloodstream where they can be harvested for use in transplantation — and they do so with fewer side effects than drugs now in use. For patients with blood disorders such as leukaemia, multiple myeloma or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells — precursor cells that reside in the bone marrow and give rise to all types of blood cell —...
  • Diabetes Reversal In Mice Via Stem Cells

    03/07/2013 3:15:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    redOrbit ^ | June 28, 2012 | Connie K. Ho
    Diabetes is a detrimental disease. In order to combat the illness, University of British Columbia (UBC) researchers conducted a study with an industry partner and discovered that stem cells can reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice. The discovery leads the way for the development of innovative treatments of diabetes, which is caused by deficient production of insulin by the pancreas. Insulin allows glucose to be held by the bodyÂ’s muscle, fat, and liver; in turn, itÂ’s used as fuel for the body. Blindness, heart attack, kidney failure, nerve damage, and stroke are possible consequences of low insulin production. The research...
  • Newt sequencing may set back efforts to regrow human limbs

    02/27/2013 2:15:32 AM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Nature News ^ | 21 February 2013 | Zoe Cormier
    Amphibian's unique proteins cast doubt on existence of latent potential for regeneration. The ability of some animals to regenerate tissue is generally considered to be an ancient quality of all multicellular animals. A genetic analysis of newts, however, now suggests that it evolved much more recently. Tiny and delicate it may be, but the red spotted newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) has tissue-engineering skills that far surpass the most advanced biotechnology labs. The newt can regenerate lost tissue, including heart muscle, components of its central nervous system and even the lens of its eye. Doctors hope that this skill relies on a...
  • Researchers Develop Injectable Gel to Repair Damaged Hearts

    02/25/2013 9:31:30 PM PST · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Voice of America ^ | February 21, 2013 | Jessica Berman
    People who suffer heart attacks are at increased risk of having a second and potentially fatal occurrence because of the damage the heart attack does to cardiac muscle tissue. Now scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new biomaterial - an injectable hydrogel  - that can repair the damage from heart attacks, and help promote the growth of new heart tissue.   Millions of people around the world suffer heart attacks every year and survive. These traumatic events occur when blood supply to the heart muscles is somehow blocked, robbing them of oxygen and causing them...
  • Repair damaged eyes with stem cell discs

    12/13/2012 8:25:58 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Futurity ^ | December 11, 2012 | Amy Stone-Sheffield
    U. SHEFFIELD (UK) — Engineers have developed a new technique to graft a biodegradable disc loaded with stem cells onto damaged eyes.The team at the University of Sheffield describes the method, which involves producing membranes to assist with grafting, in the journal Acta Biomaterialia. The goal is to treat damage to the cornea, the transparent layer on the front of the eye, which is one of the major causes of blindness in the world.Using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning, the researchers made a disc of biodegradable material that can be fixed over the cornea. The disc...
  • Heart cells coaxed to divide and conquer

    12/06/2012 12:33:50 AM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 05 December 2012 | Kerri Smith
    The heart does have a limited ability to heal itself — and a genetic 'trick' can harness this. Can heart cells renew themselves, and can scientists help them do so? Two papers published online in Nature today suggest that heart muscle cells can make copies of themselves at a very low rate1, but that a genetic trick can prompt them to do a better job2. Those results give hope that hearts damaged by cardiovascular disease — which causes the deaths of almost 17 million people a year — could be coaxed to regenerate themselves. Heart muscle cannot renew itself very...
  • 'Fountain of youth' technique rejuvenates aging stem cells

    11/29/2012 7:38:28 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | November 27, 2012 | NA
    This is an image of an aged stem cell after growth factors were added. A new method of growing cardiac tissue is teaching old stem cells new tricks. The discovery, which transforms aged stem cells into cells that function like much younger ones, may one day enable scientists to grow cardiac patches for damaged or diseased hearts from a patient's own stem cells—no matter what age the patient—while avoiding the threat of rejection. Stem cell therapies involving donated bone marrow stem cells run the risk of patient rejection in a portion of the population, argues Milica Radisic, Canada Research Chair...
  • Designing Regenerative Biomaterial Therapies for the Clinic

    11/15/2012 8:36:27 PM PST · by neverdem
    Science Translational Medicine ^ | 14 November 2012 | E. Thomas Pashuck and Molly M. Stevens
    Vol. 4, Issue 160, p. 160sr4 Sci. Transl. Med. DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002717 STATE OF THE ART REVIEW The ability to regenerate damaged tissue is one of the great challenges in biomaterials and medicine. Successful treatments will require advances in areas ranging from basic cell biology to materials synthesis, but there have been major hurdles in translating the biomedical advances, such as scaffolds that direct stem cell differentiation, into marketed products. Careful consideration of the challenges going from bench to bedside is paramount in maximizing the chances that a good idea becomes a good treatment. We look at a variety of material-based...
  • President Obama and the Embryonic Backfire

    11/08/2012 12:54:57 AM PST · by neverdem · 21 replies
    huffingtonpost.com | November 7, 2012 | Robin L. Smith
    Here's the link.
  • Thyroid is latest success in regenerative medicine

    10/11/2012 5:03:43 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 10 October 2012 | Dan Jones
    Hormone-producing gland can be created from (mouse) embryonic stem cells. A series of achievements have stoked excitement about the potential of regenerative medicine, which aims to tackle diseases by replacing or regenerating damaged cells, tissues and organs. A paper in Nature today1 reports another step towards this goal: the generation of working thyroid cells from stem cells. Sabine Costagliola, a molecular embryologist at the Free University of Brussels, and her team study the development of the thyroid gland, which regulates how the body uses energy and affects sensitivity to other hormones. Their research shows that thyroid function can be re-established...
  • Reprogrammed Cells Earn Nobel Honor

    10/08/2012 7:27:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 8 October 2012 | Gretchen Vogel
    The discovery that cellular development is not a one-way street has earned this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. John B. Gurdon, a developmental biologist at the Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and Shinya Yamanaka, a stem cell researcher at Kyoto University in Japan and the Gladstone Institute at the University of California, San Francisco, have won the prize for their discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to resemble the versatile cells of a very early embryo. These so-called pluripotent cells have the ability to become any of...
  • One Day, Growing Spare Parts Inside the Body

    09/29/2012 7:50:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 17, 2012 | HENRY FOUNTAIN
    Dr. Tracy Grikscheit held a length of intestine in her gloved hands, examining it inch by inch as if she were checking a bicycle tube for leaks... --snip-- Dr. Grikscheit’s work is at the forefront of efforts in laboratories around the world to build replacement organs and tissues. Although the long-sought goal of creating complex organs like hearts and livers to ease transplant shortages remains a long way off, researchers are having success making simpler structures like bladders and windpipes, thanks to advances in understanding stem cells... --snip-- This kind of seeding of scaffolds with cells is a common approach...