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Keyword: romanempire

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  • Chariot races bring ancient Roman city back to life in Jordan

    06/14/2005 11:48:57 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 4 replies · 686+ views
    Middle East Times ^ | June 14, 2005 | Hala Boncompagni
    The sun bears down and dust swirls as Roman centurions, followed by armor-clad legionnaires and bruised gladiators, tramp out of the ancient hippodrome to the trailing sounds of a military march. In the seats all around twenty-first century spectators in modern-day Jordan cheer and applaud the spectacle before them - a one-hour show held in honor of Julius Caesar and part of Jordan's newest tourist attraction. Starting mid-July visitors to Jordan can plunge into the past, reliving in a unique location just north of the capital, Amman, some of the high moments that made the Roman Empire. The setting is...
  • Highest-Paid Athlete Hailed From Ancient Rome

    09/02/2010 12:07:51 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 40 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 9/1/10 | Rossella Lorenz1
    Ultra millionaire sponsorship deals such as those signed by sprinter Usain Bolt, motorcycle racer Valentino Rossi and tennis player Maria Sharapova, are just peanuts compared to the personal fortune amassed by a second century A.D. Roman racer, according to an estimate published in the historical magazine Lapham's Quarterly.According to Peter Struck, associate professor of classical studies at the University of Pennsylvania, an illiterate charioteer named Gaius Appuleius Diocles earned “the staggering sum" of 35,863,120 sesterces (ancient Roman coins) in prize money.Recorded in a monumental inscription erected in 146 A.D., the figure eclipses the fortunes of all modern sport stars,...
  • Blue versus Green: Rocking the Byzantine Empire

    03/05/2012 5:55:02 AM PST · by Renfield · 11 replies
    “Bread and circuses,” the poet Juvenal wrote scathingly. “That’s all the common people want.” Food and entertainment. Or to put it another way, basic sustenance and bloodshed, because the most popular entertainments offered by the circuses of Rome were the gladiators and chariot racing, the latter often as deadly as the former. As many as 12 four-horse teams raced one another seven times around the confines of the greatest arenas—the Circus Maximus in Rome was 2,000 feet long, but its track was not more than 150 feet wide—and rules were few, collisions all but inevitable, and hideous injuries to the...
  • Carthage Archaeologists Dig Up Smart Cooling System For Chariot Racers

    07/09/2016 8:36:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 30, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    On the north coast of Africa lie the ruins of a city that came within a hairbreadth of defeating the might of Rome. Now archaeologists digging at the famous Circus of Carthage have revealed a startlingly advanced system to cool down horses and chariots during races... Key to the discovery of the clever cooling system at the Circus of Carthage, the biggest sporting arena outside Rome, was the detection of water resistant mortar... The discovery was made at the spina, the median strip of the circus, around the ends of which the charioteers would turn during races. The spina would...
  • Rites of the Scythians

    07/09/2016 3:17:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Andrew Curry
    ...As he and his team began to slice into the mound, located 30 miles east of Stavropol... It took nearly a month of digging to reach the bottom. There, Belinski ran into a layer of thick clay that, at first glance, looked like a natural feature of the landscape, not the result of human activity. He uncovered a stone box, a foot or so deep, containing a few finger and rib bones from a teenager... Nested one inside the other in the box were two gold vessels of unsurpassed workmanship. Beneath these lay three gold armbands, a heavy ring, and...
  • Jerusalem dig finds big gold hoard from 7th century

    12/22/2008 7:58:22 AM PST · by BGHater · 26 replies · 1,152+ views
    Reuters ^ | 22 Dec 2008 | Douglas Hamilton
    Excavations have unearthed a hoard of more than 1,300-year-old gold coins under a car park by the ancient walls of Jerusalem, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said on Monday. Archaeologists said the discovery of the 264 coins, in the ruins of a building dating to about the 7th century, the end of the Byzantine period, was one of the largest coin hoards uncovered in Jerusalem. "We've had pottery, we've had glass, but we've had nothing like this," said British archaeologist Nadine Ross, who found the hoard under a large rock on Sunday, in the fourth and final week of a trip...
  • All transactions to be conducted in the presence of a tax collector

    07/05/2016 4:30:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 22 replies
    SovereignMan.com ^ | April 17, 2012 | simon black
    In the terminal collapse of the Roman Empire, there was perhaps no greater burden to the average citizen than the extreme taxes they were forced to pay. The tax ‘reforms’ of Emperor Diocletian in the 3rd century were so rigid and unwavering that many people were driven to starvation and bankruptcy. The state went so far as to chase around widows and children to collect taxes owed. By the 4th century, the Roman economy and tax structure were so dismal that many farmers abandoned their lands in order to receive public entitlements. At this point, the imperial government was spending...
  • April 16, 2012 Vilnius, Lithuania : $7 Gasoline. Thanks Ben.

    07/05/2016 4:36:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 23 replies
    SovereignMan.com ^ | April 16, 2012 | simon black
    The consistent theme from my travels so far in Europe– the UK, Scandinavia, Lithuania– has been noticeably higher prices. Shockingly so, in some instances. London, where I spent a rather pleasant and rare sunny weekend with friends and colleagues, has gone from being ‘stupid’ pricey, to just plain absurd. Tube prices, taxi fares, food prices, restaurant bills, train fares… it all keeps going up. And to cap it all off, the British government’s VAT increases have ensured that absolutely everyone is paying a little bit more. Here in Lithuania, the buzz around town is the spiraling gasoline prices, which have...
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • Goths Vs.Greeks: Epic battle revealed in newfound text

    06/30/2016 8:01:58 AM PDT · by wildbill · 23 replies
    Fox News ^ | March 2016 | Owen Jarus
    Fragments of an ancient Greek text telling of an invasion of Greece by the Goths during the third century A.D. have been discovered in the Austrian National Library. The text includes a battle fought at the pass of Thermopylae. Researchers used spectral imaging to enhance the fragments, making it possible to read them. The analysis suggests the fragments were copied in the 11th century A.D. and are from a text that was written in the third-century A.D. by an Athens writer named Dexippus.
  • Face of the Greek God Pan

    06/30/2016 8:07:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | October 12, 2015 | Megan Sauter
    In November 2014, the team at Antiochia Hippos, Israel, uncovered an extraordinary artifact -- a large bronze mask of the Greek god Pan (or Faunus in the Roman pantheon)... Weighing more than 11 pounds and measuring nearly 12 inches tall, the Pan mask is made of well-cast bronze. It was discovered outside the walled city of Hippos, Israel -- in a basalt tower with 6.5-foot-wide exterior walls... The Pan mask at Hippos, Israel, is an extraordinary and unique find, but Eisenberg explains that some parallels exist in the archaeological record: Similar masks -- perhaps influenced by the style of theater...
  • Skeletons and Gold Coins Found in Pompeii Shop

    06/24/2016 10:31:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists excavating a shop on the outskirts of Pompeii have found four skeletons, several gold coins, and a necklace pendant, according to an Associated Press report. The skeletons belonged to young people who died in the back of the shop when nearby Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. There was an oven in the shop that the archaeologists believe may have been used to make bronze objects. There is evidence that the shop was targeted by looters seeking treasure after the eruption, but they apparently missed the gold coins and the gold-leaf-foil, flower-shaped pendant. Archaeologists have been excavating a second...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Egyptians hope to find Cleopatra's tomb

    04/15/2009 7:51:41 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 10 replies · 570+ views
    timesonline.co.uk ^ | April 16, 2009 | Sheera Frenkel
    Cleopatra and Mark Antony were immortalised as two of history’s greatest lovers, but their final resting place has always been a mystery. Now archaeologists in Egypt are about to start excavating a site that they believe could conceal their tombs. Zahi Hawass, director of Egypt’s Superior Council for Antiquities, said yesterday that there was evidence to suggest that Cleopatra and Mark Antony were buried together in the complex tunnel system underlying the Tabusiris Magna temple, 17 miles from the city of Alexandria. The dig, which begins next week, could reveal answers to the many myths surrounding the pair — including...
  • Snake unlikely to have killed Cleopatra

    10/21/2015 1:16:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 21, 2015 | Mike Addelman
    Academics at The University of Manchester have dismissed the long-held argument that the ancient Egyptian queen Cleopatra was killed by a snake bite. Andrew Gray, curator of herpetology at Manchester Museum, says venomous snakes in Egypt -- cobras or vipers -- would have been too large to get unseen into the queen's palace. He was speaking to Egyptologist Dr Joyce Tyldesley in a new video which is part of a new online course introducing ancient Egyptian history, using six items from the Museum's collection. According to Dr Tyldesley, the ancient accounts say a snake hid in a basket of figs...
  • Cleopatra Killed by Drug Cocktail?

    07/02/2010 6:04:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, July 1, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Cleopatra, the last queen of Egypt, died from swallowing a lethal drug cocktail and not from a snake bite, a new study claims. According to Christoph Schäfer, a German historian and professor at the University of Trier, the legendary beauty queen was unlikely to have committed suicide by letting an asp -- an Egyptian cobra -- sink into her flesh... "The Roman historian Cassius Dio, writing about 200 years after Cleopatra's demise, stated that she died a quiet and pain-free death, which is not compatible with a cobra bite. Indeed, the snake's venom would have caused a painful and disfiguring...
  • Tomb of the century [Anthony and Cleopatra]

    04/29/2009 4:03:39 PM PDT · by SJackson · 19 replies · 1,099+ views
    Al Ahram ^ | 4-29-09
    Archaeological traces found at Taposiris Magna west of Alexandria may indicate the tomb of one of the most famous couples in history, Queen Cleopatra and Mark Anthony, reports Nevine El-Aref A joint Egyptian and Dominican Republic archaeological mission working at Taposiris Magna, an area of great archaeological importance on the Mediterranean coast west of Alexandria and site of a temple dedicated to the god of prosperity, Osiris, and a number of Graeco- Roman catacombs, has discovered several Ptolemaic objects dating back to the reign of the famous Queen Cleopatra. The team was searching the site in the hope of locating...
  • Dig 'may reveal' Cleopatra's tomb

    04/15/2009 6:43:13 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 11 replies · 1,146+ views
    BBC ^ | April 15, 2009 | BBC
    Archaeologists are to search three sites in Egypt that they say may contain the tomb of doomed lovers Anthony and Cleopatra. Excavation at the sites, which are near a temple west of the coastal city of Alexandria, is due to begin next week. Teams working in the area said the recent discovery of tombs containing 10 mummies suggested that Anthony and Cleopatra might be buried close by.
  • 'Indiana Jones'-Like Archeologist Says He's Found Cleopatra's Tomb

    05/25/2008 1:02:47 PM PDT · by AngieGal · 30 replies · 2,544+ views
    Fox News ^ | May 25, 2008 | The Sunday Times
    A flamboyant archeologist known worldwide for his trademark Indiana Jones hat believes he has identified the site where Cleopatra is buried. Now, with a team of 12 archeologists and 70 excavators, Zahi Hawass, 60, the head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, has begun the search for her tomb. In addition, after a breakthrough two weeks ago, Hawass hopes to find Cleopatra's lover, the Roman general Mark Antony, sharing her last resting place at the site of a temple, the Taposiris Magna, 28 miles west of Alexandria.
  • Egypt: Tomb Of Cleopatra And Lover To Be Uncovered

    04/25/2008 7:44:34 PM PDT · by blam · 82 replies · 8,437+ views
    Adnkronos ^ | 4-24-2008
    Egypt: Tomb of Cleopatra and lover to be uncovered Cairo, 24 April(AKI) - Archaeologists have revealed plans to uncover the 2000 year-old tomb of ancient Egypt's most famous lovers, Cleopatra and the Roman general Mark Antony later this year. Zahi Hawass, prominent archaeologist and director of Egypt's superior council for antiquities announced a proposal to test the theory that the couple were buried together. He discussed the project in Cairo at a media conference about the ancient pharaohs. Hawass said that the remains of the legendary Egyptian queen and her Roman lover, Mark Antony, were inside a temple called Tabusiris...
  • Found: the Sister Cleopatra Killed

    03/15/2009 11:07:14 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 35 replies · 1,596+ views
    The Times (London) ^ | March 15, 2009 | Daniel Foggo
    ARCHEOLOGISTS and forensic experts believe they have identified the skeleton of Cleopatra’s younger sister, murdered more than 2,000 years ago on the orders of the Egyptian queen. The remains of Princess Arsinöe, put to death in 41BC on the orders of Cleopatra and her Roman lover Mark Antony to eliminate her as a rival, are the first relics of the Ptolemaic dynasty to be identified. The breakthrough, by an Austrian team, has provided pointers to Cleopatra’s true ethnicity. Scholars have long debated whether she was Greek or Macedonian like her ancestor the original Ptolemy, a Macedonian general who was made...
  • Skeleton of Cleopatra's Murdered Sister Identified

    03/15/2009 3:13:37 PM PDT · by RDTF · 16 replies · 693+ views
    Fox ^ | March 15, 2009
    Archeologists and forensic experts believe they have identified the skeleton of Cleopatra’s younger sister, murdered more than 2,000 years ago on the orders of the Egyptian queen. The remains of Princess Arsinöe, put to death in 41BC on the orders of Cleopatra and her Roman lover Mark Antony to eliminate her as a rival, are the first relics of the Ptolemaic dynasty to be identified. -snip-
  • Found: the sister Cleopatra killed

    03/15/2009 2:18:56 AM PDT · by BlackVeil · 28 replies · 2,002+ views
    The Times ^ | March 15, 2009 | Daniel Foggo
    Forensic experts believe they have identified the skeleton of the queen’s younger sister, murdered over 2,000 years ago ARCHEOLOGISTS and forensic experts believe they have identified the skeleton of Cleopatra’s younger sister, murdered more than 2,000 years ago on the orders of the Egyptian queen. The remains of Princess Arsinöe, put to death in 41BC on the orders of Cleopatra and her Roman lover Mark Antony to eliminate her as a rival, are the first relics of the Ptolemaic dynasty to be identified. The breakthrough, by an Austrian team, has provided pointers to Cleopatra’s true ethnicity. Scholars have long debated...
  • Roman Silver Hoard Discovered in Scotland

    06/18/2016 12:53:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | editors
    Researchers led by Gordon Noble of the University of Aberdeen returned to a farmer’s field in northeastern Scotland where a hand pin, chain, and spiral bangle all made of silver in the fourth or fifth centuries A.D. had been found more than 170 years ago. According to a report in Live Science, on the second day of the investigation, the team, which had the assistance of metal detectorists, found three Roman silver coins, a silver strap end, a piece of a silver bracelet, and pieces of hack silver. Over a period of 18 months, they gathered a total of 100...
  • Archaeologists Find Ancient Collector's Hoard of Hasmonean Coins

    06/14/2016 12:54:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 10, 2016 | Nir Hasson
    A rare cache of silver coins dating to the Hasmonean period, some 2,140 years ago, has been discovered in a salvage excavation in central Israel. The 16 coins, shekels and half-shekels (tetradrachms and didrachms), date from around 126 BCE. They had been minted farther north, in the city of Tyre, and bear the images of the king, Antiochus VII and his brother Demetrius Israeli, stated Avraham Tendler, director of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority... Closer analysis of the coins showed that the cache contains one or two coins from every year between 135 to 126 BCE... Aside...
  • Whistling Sling Bullets Were Roman Troops' Secret 'Terror Weapon'

    06/13/2016 11:55:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 13, 2016 | Tom Metcalfe
    Some 1,800 years ago, Roman troops used "whistling" sling bullets as a "terror weapon" against their barbarian foes, according to archaeologists who found the cast lead bullets at a site in Scotland. Weighing about 1 ounce (30 grams), each of the bullets had been drilled with a 0.2-inch (5 millimeters) hole that the researchers think was designed to give the soaring bullets a sharp buzzing or whistling noise in flight. The bullets were found recently at Burnswark Hill in southwestern Scotland, where a massive Roman attack against native defenders in a hilltop fort took place in the second century A.D......
  • The World's First Computer May Have Been Used To Tell Fortunes [Engraved text translation]

    06/10/2016 6:55:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    A ten-year project to decipher inscriptions on the ancient Greek “Antikythera mechanism” has revealed new functions, including the first hint that the device was used to make astrological predictions. The writings also lend support to the idea that the gadget, often called the world's first computer because of its ability to model complex astronomical cycles, originated from the island of Rhodes. Until now, scholars have focused on decoding the sophisticated array of gearwheels inside the 2000-year-old artifact. The new publication tackles instead the lettering squeezed onto every available surface. “It’s like discovering a whole new manuscript,” says Mike Edmunds, emeritus...
  • One of the world's greatest art collections hides behind this fence

    05/30/2016 6:24:20 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 21 replies
    New York Times ^ | May 28 2016 | Graham Bowley and Doreen Carvajal
    The drab free port zone near the Geneva city center, a compound of blocky gray and vanilla warehouses surrounded by train tracks, roads and a barbed-wire fence, looks like the kind of place where beauty goes to die. But within its walls, crated or sealed cheek by jowl in cramped storage vaults, are more than a million of some of the most exquisite artworks ever made. Treasures from the glory days of ancient Rome. Museum-quality paintings by old masters. An estimated 1,000 works by Picasso. As the price of art has skyrocketed, perhaps nothing illustrates the art-as-bullion approach to contemporary...
  • Discovery of 410 wooden tablets gives glimpse into life of London's first Romans (ed)

    06/01/2016 7:41:27 PM PDT · by Ray76 · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Jun 1, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    An archaeological dig has turned up the earliest known handwritten documents in Britain among hundreds of Roman waxed writing tablets. Some 410 wooden tablets have been discovered, 87 of which have been deciphered to reveal names, events, business and legal dealings and evidence of someone practising writing the alphabet and numerals. With only 19 legible tablets previously known from London, the find from the first decades of Roman rule in Britain provides a wealth of new information about the city's earliest Romans.
  • Finding a new formula for concrete

    05/28/2016 11:29:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 75 replies
    MIT News ^ | May 25, 2016 | Jennifer Chu
    Researchers at MIT are seeking to redesign concrete — the most widely used human-made material in the world — by following nature’s blueprints. In a paper published online in the journal Construction and Building Materials, the team contrasts cement paste — concrete’s binding ingredient — with the structure and properties of natural materials such as bones, shells, and deep-sea sponges. As the researchers observed, these biological materials are exceptionally strong and durable, thanks in part to their precise assembly of structures at multiple length scales, from the molecular to the macro, or visible, level. From their observations, the team, led...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • Grim reality of life in ancient Rome revealed: Average worker was DEAD by 30 [tr]

    05/28/2016 5:01:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 28, 2016 | Ekin Karasin
    The average ancient Roman worker was riddled with arthritis, suffered broken bones and was dead by 30 thanks to a diet of rotting grains and a lifetime of hard labour. The grim realities of the Eternal City were revealed in a study carried out by an Italian team of specialists that used modern-scanning techniques to analyse 2,000 ancient skeletons. The majority of the skeletons from the first and third century AD, found in the suburbs of the ancient city, had broken collar bones, noses and hand bones.
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • Rome Mulls 'Metro Museum' After New Line Unearths Ruin

    05/21/2016 5:27:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Local ^ | 17 May 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Rome authorities are set to build the world's first 'archaeological underground station' around an ancient Roman barracks which came to light during works to build a new underground station. The remains of a second century imperial barracks were found nine metres below street level in November, when construction began on Amba Aradam-Ipponio station on the city's new metro Line C. The 1,753 square-metre ruin contains some 39 rooms, many of which contain original mosaics and frescoes. Lying so deep under the city, it was impossible for modern survey equipment to detect the ruin before work began. But work on the...
  • It Came from Outer Space?

    11/25/2004 5:13:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 972+ views
    American Scientist ^ | November-December 2004 | David Schneider
    Speranza points out another difficulty with the impact-origins theory. Large blocks of limestone sit within the boundaries of the Sirente "crater." Such limestone would not have survived an impact. So if Ormö's theory is correct, one must surmise that somebody set these giant chunks of rock in place since the crater formed. To Speranza, that just didn't make sense. Speranza and colleagues further argue that Ormö's radiocarbon dating gave one age for the main feature (placing it in the 4th or 5th century a.d.) and a completely different age for a nearby "crater" called C9, a date in the 3rd...
  • 'Asteroid Impact Could Have Prompted Constantine's Conversion'

    06/18/2003 4:45:56 PM PDT · by blam · 36 replies · 777+ views
    Ananova ^ | 6-18-2003
    'Asteroid impact could have prompted Constantine's conversion' An asteroid which exploded like a nuclear bomb may have converted the Roman emperor Constantine to Christianity it is now being claimed. Scientists have discovered an impact crater dating from the fourth of fifth century in the Italian Apennine mountains. They believe the crater in the Sirente mountains, which is larger than a football field, could explain the legend of Constantine's conversion. Accounts from the 4th century describe how barbarians stood at the gates of the Roman empire while a Christian movement threatened its stability from within. It is said the emperor saw...
  • Boadicea May Have Had Her Chips On Site Of McDonald's

    05/24/2006 8:59:01 PM PDT · by blam · 74 replies · 1,808+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5-25-2006 | Nick Britten
    Boadicea may have had her chips on site of McDonald's By Nick Britten (Filed: 25/05/2006) Archaeologists believe they may have found the final battle site for the warrior queen Boadicea - on the site of a McDonald's restaurant. Having spent her life in fierce resistance to one empire - the Romans - her last stand is thought to have been overshadowed by another one, this time corporate. Having found ancient artefacts where new houses and flats are due to be built, experts have now asked the local authority to allow a full excavation of the area. Little is known about...
  • Return of the queen

    06/30/2004 9:58:21 AM PDT · by orionblamblam · 12 replies · 377+ views
    The Guardian (boo, hisss) ^ | June 30, 2004 | Stuart Jeffries
    There are some lines of William Cowper inscribed on the plinth of the bronze statue of Boadicea near Westminster Bridge in central London: "Regions Caesar never knew/Thy posterity shall sway." The words have never been truer. Hollywood has four films in development about the British warrior queen. One of them, Warrior, is being produced by Mel Gibson, partly with money from the proceeds of his film The Passion of The Christ (a rare example of fundamentalist Christian money backing a project with a pagan heroine). Along with a DreamWorks project called Queen Fury, Paramount's Warrior Queen and another called My...
  • Gibson To Cause More Controversy?

    06/02/2004 5:04:07 PM PDT · by Paul Atreides · 30 replies · 1,740+ views
    IMDb.com ^ | 6-2-04
    Mel Gibson's forthcoming film about Britain's warrior queen Boudicca is guaranteed to cause fury amongst feminists and historians, experts predict. Folklorists believe Gibson - whose controversial The Passion Of The Christ movie sparked uproar among Jewish groups this year - faces widespread criticism in his efforts to bring Boudicca to the big screen, because she remains an enigma to historians. Scholars are also convinced feminists will attack Gibson if he fails to portray Boudicca as the icon they have turned her into. Folklorist Dr Juliette Wood, "Take any figure where there's been emotional investment and you're going to annoy someone....
  • Gibson to Produce 'Boudicca' Epic

    04/28/2004 7:25:58 PM PDT · by solitas · 40 replies · 1,575+ views
    newsmax ^ | 4/28/2004 | Newsmax staff
    With the success of "The Passion Of The Christ," Mel Gibson can pretty much make whatever movie he wants, and he is once again looking back in time – to produce an epic about Boudicca, who led Britain against Roman conquerors. The Scotsman newspaper reports that the film will be like "Bravehart - with a bra." Boudicca rose from peasant girl to military leader, and united the Celtic tribes of Britain. The film will be directed by Gavin O’Connor, who told the Hollywood trade paper Variety: "What drew me is that she was driven by personal revenge. Her goals were...
  • Study Sheds Light On Ancient Roman Water System In Naples

    05/18/2016 1:46:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, May 16, 2016 | editors
    A study suggests that lead isotopes can reveal the history of ancient Roman water distribution systems. The impact of the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in AD 79 on the water supply of Naples and other nearby cities has been a matter of debate. Hugo Delile and colleagues measured lead isotopic compositions of a well-dated sedimentary sequence from the excavated ancient harbor of Naples. The isotopic composition of leachates from the harbor sediments differed from those of lead native to the region, suggesting contamination from imported lead used in the ancient plumbing. The authors observed an abrupt change in isotopic composition in...
  • Discovery of Roman fort built after Boudican revolt

    05/18/2016 1:36:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | May 13, 2016 | editors
    New research published by archaeologists from MOLA reveals a previously unknown Roman fort, built in AD63 as a direct response to the sacking of London by the native tribal Queen of the Iceni, Boudica. The revolt razed the early Roman town to the ground in AD60/61 but until now little was understood about the Roman's response to this devastating uprising. Excavations at Plantation Place for British Land on Fenchurch Street in the City of London exposed a section of a rectangular fort that covered 3.7acres. The timber and earthwork fort had 3metre high banks reinforced with interlacing timbers and faced...
  • Roman-Era Shipwreck Yields Moon Goddess Statue, Coin Stashes

    05/17/2016 2:45:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 16, 2016 | Stephanie Pappas
    One civilization's trash is another civilization's treasure. A ship in Israel's Caesarea Harbor was filled with bronze statues headed for recycling when it sank about 1,600 years ago. Now, thanks to a chance discovery by a pair of divers, archaeologists have salvaged a haul of statuary fragments, figurines and coins from the seafloor. The coins found in the wreckage date to the mid-300s A.D. Some show Constantine, who ruled the Western Roman Empire from A.D. 312-324, and who unified the Eastern and Western Roman Empire in A.D. 324; he ruled both until his death in A.D. 337. Other coins show...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/15/2016 1:15:34 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 10 replies
    business-standard.com ^ | May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST | Press Trust of India
    Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India Press Trust of India | Melbourne May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST Ancient Irish musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India, according to a new study of musical horns from iron-age Ireland. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts shows a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive...
  • Pompeii Pottery May Rewrite History

    11/08/2004 11:40:27 AM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 1,296+ views
    ABC Net ^ | 11-8-2004 | Heather Catchpole
    Pompeii pottery may rewrite history Heather Catchpole ABC Science Online Monday, 8 November 2004 A broken plate is one of the pieces in the puzzle of how ancient cultures traded (Image: Jaye Pont) Archaeologists may need to change their view of Pompeii's role in trade and commerce, after a ceramics expert's recent discovery. Australian researcher Jaye Pont from the Museum of Ancient Cultures at Sydney's Macquarie University says people who lived in Pompeii bought their pottery locally and didn't import it. Pont said the find could "make waves" among archaeologists looking at trade in the Mediterranean. And she said researchers...
  • Evidence of 3,000-Year-Old Cinnamon Trade Found in Israel

    08/20/2013 9:55:09 AM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | 8-20-2013 | Owen Jarus
    How far would you go to get your cinnamon fix? If you lived in the Levant 3,000 years ago (a region that includes modern day Israel), very far indeed new research indicates. Researchers analyzing the contents of 27 flasks from five archaeological sites in Israel that date back around 3,000 years have found that 10 of the flasks contain cinnamaldehyde, the compound that gives cinnamon its flavor, indicating that the spice was stored in these flasks. At this time cinnamon was found in the Far East with the closest places to Israel being southern India and Sri Lanka located at...
  • 'India's Pompeii' uncovered

    12/11/2006 9:17:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 449+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 9, 2006 | Chitrangada Choudhury
    The first construction boom began about 2,000 years ago, when Ashoka the Great was founding the first Indian empire, when Julius Caesar reigned over Rome, when traders from the Mediterranean found their way to what is now an obscure Maharastra village... But another construction boom threatens the existence of an area they say could well reveal itself as "the Pompeii of India", the legendary Roman city buried by a volcano and lost for 1,600 years... A dusty village museum houses a treasure-trove of 23,852 pieces of stone and terracotta sculptures, replicas of Roman coins and lamps, miniature inkpots, jewellery and...
  • Scientists Discover Ancient Sea Wharf (Marine Silk Road)

    12/30/2004 11:46:01 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 782+ views
    East Day.Com ^ | 12-30-2004
    Scientists discover ancient sea wharf 30/12/2004 7:32 Archeologists say that they have found the country's oldest wharf and it is believed to be the starting point of an ancient sea route to Central and West Asia. The discovery has reaffirmed the widespread belief that the ancient trade route started in Hepu County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, archeologists said at yesterday's symposium on the nation's marine silk road. After three years of excavation, archeologists have unearthed a wharf that is at least 2,000 years old in Guchengtou Village, according to Xiong Zhaoming, head of the archeological team. At the same site,...
  • The Shipwreck at Assarca Island, Eritrea

    10/17/2004 9:22:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 549+ views
    Institute of Nautical Archaeology ^ | Revised January 1996 | Ralph K. Pedersen, M.A.
    It is not known whether the wood fragments were wreck material, or if they were associated with the remains of a Stalin's Organ lying nearby. No other artifacts, including anchors, were found despite the digging of several small test pits approximately 15 cm. deep to determine the extent of the wreck. It is probable more artifacts lie under the sand, as well as concreted into the coral. My original opinion of the date of the pottery was 7th century...I believed, however, a date a few centuries earlier or later was also possible. Research has revealed that my initial dating...