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Keyword: romanempire

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  • Roman road discovered during digging in German city Aachen

    11/09/2017 11:37:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Wichita Eagle ^ | November 07, 2017 | AP
    Aachen city archaeologist Andreas Schaub told the dpa news agency Tuesday the road is about six meters (yards) wide and is thought to possibly date back to the second century. Schaub says the road could have connected the important settlement in Aachen to what is today the Dutch city of Maastricht.
  • The Death of Trajan ~ August 8 ~ His correspondence with Pliny, and his legendary rescue from Hell.

    08/08/2017 10:30:01 AM PDT · by Antoninus · 3 replies
    Gloria Romanorum ^ | 8/8/17 | Florentius
    Conqueror of Dacia. Subduer of Parthia. The Roman Emperor Marcus Ulpius Traianus — or Trajan as he is known to history — died on August 8 in the year AD 117. By most measures, Trajan was a superior emperor. In his satirical work The Caesars, written in AD 361, the emperor Julian the Apostate puts these words into the mouth of Trajan in defense of his reign and exploits before the gods: "O Zeus and ye other gods, when I took over the empire it was in a sort of lethargy and much disordered by the tyranny that had long...
  • Trump… Our Claudius

    06/04/2017 9:57:31 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies
    The Hoover Institution ^ | May 31, 2017 | Victor Davis Hanson
    The Roman Emperor Claudius, who reigned from 41 to 54 AD, was never supposed to be emperor. He came to office at age 50, an old man in Roman times. Claudius succeeded the charismatic, youthful heartthrob Caligula—son of the beloved Germanicus and the “little boot” who turned out to be a narcissist monster before being assassinated in office. Claudius was an unusual emperor, the first to be born outside Italy, in Roman Gaul. Under the Augustan Principate, new Caesars—who claimed direct lineage from the “divine” Augustus—were usually rubber-stamped by the toadyish Senate. However, the outsider Claudius (who had no political...
  • How Roman Central Planners Destroyed Their Economy

    10/07/2016 5:30:24 PM PDT · by Beave Meister · 15 replies
    Foundation for Economic Education ^ | 10/5/2016 | Richard M. Ebeling
    In 449 B.C., the Roman government passed the Law of the Twelve Tables, regulating much of commercial, social, and family life. Some of these laws were reasonable and consistent with an economy of contract and commerce; others prescribed gruesome punishments and assigned cruel powers and privileges given to some. Other regulations fixed a maximum rate of interest on loans of approximately 8 percent. The Roman government also had the habit of periodically forgiving all interest owed in the society; that is, it legally freed private debtors from having to pay back interest due to private creditors. The Roman government also...
  • St. Maurice The first black saint

    09/20/2016 9:33:53 AM PDT · by mainestategop · 12 replies
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYQDSQM0Mb4 Saint Maurice's feast day is on the 22nd of September. (Two days from right now.) So for my Catholic and Coptic viewers, I present to you, this diddy on the life and martyrdom of St Maurice. Saint Maurice (also Moritz, Morris, or Mauritius) was the leader of the legendary Roman Theban Legion n the 3rd century, and one of the favorite and most widely venerated saints of that group. He was the patron saint of several professions, locales, and kingdoms. He is revered in the Catholic Coptic and Orthodox churches. He is the patron saint of soldiers, veterans, armorers,...
  • Chariot races bring ancient Roman city back to life in Jordan

    06/14/2005 11:48:57 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 4 replies · 686+ views
    Middle East Times ^ | June 14, 2005 | Hala Boncompagni
    The sun bears down and dust swirls as Roman centurions, followed by armor-clad legionnaires and bruised gladiators, tramp out of the ancient hippodrome to the trailing sounds of a military march. In the seats all around twenty-first century spectators in modern-day Jordan cheer and applaud the spectacle before them - a one-hour show held in honor of Julius Caesar and part of Jordan's newest tourist attraction. Starting mid-July visitors to Jordan can plunge into the past, reliving in a unique location just north of the capital, Amman, some of the high moments that made the Roman Empire. The setting is...
  • Highest-Paid Athlete Hailed From Ancient Rome

    09/02/2010 12:07:51 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 40 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 9/1/10 | Rossella Lorenz1
    Ultra millionaire sponsorship deals such as those signed by sprinter Usain Bolt, motorcycle racer Valentino Rossi and tennis player Maria Sharapova, are just peanuts compared to the personal fortune amassed by a second century A.D. Roman racer, according to an estimate published in the historical magazine Lapham's Quarterly.According to Peter Struck, associate professor of classical studies at the University of Pennsylvania, an illiterate charioteer named Gaius Appuleius Diocles earned “the staggering sum" of 35,863,120 sesterces (ancient Roman coins) in prize money.Recorded in a monumental inscription erected in 146 A.D., the figure eclipses the fortunes of all modern sport stars,...
  • Blue versus Green: Rocking the Byzantine Empire

    03/05/2012 5:55:02 AM PST · by Renfield · 11 replies
    “Bread and circuses,” the poet Juvenal wrote scathingly. “That’s all the common people want.” Food and entertainment. Or to put it another way, basic sustenance and bloodshed, because the most popular entertainments offered by the circuses of Rome were the gladiators and chariot racing, the latter often as deadly as the former. As many as 12 four-horse teams raced one another seven times around the confines of the greatest arenas—the Circus Maximus in Rome was 2,000 feet long, but its track was not more than 150 feet wide—and rules were few, collisions all but inevitable, and hideous injuries to the...
  • Carthage Archaeologists Dig Up Smart Cooling System For Chariot Racers

    07/09/2016 8:36:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 30, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    On the north coast of Africa lie the ruins of a city that came within a hairbreadth of defeating the might of Rome. Now archaeologists digging at the famous Circus of Carthage have revealed a startlingly advanced system to cool down horses and chariots during races... Key to the discovery of the clever cooling system at the Circus of Carthage, the biggest sporting arena outside Rome, was the detection of water resistant mortar... The discovery was made at the spina, the median strip of the circus, around the ends of which the charioteers would turn during races. The spina would...
  • Rites of the Scythians

    07/09/2016 3:17:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Andrew Curry
    ...As he and his team began to slice into the mound, located 30 miles east of Stavropol... It took nearly a month of digging to reach the bottom. There, Belinski ran into a layer of thick clay that, at first glance, looked like a natural feature of the landscape, not the result of human activity. He uncovered a stone box, a foot or so deep, containing a few finger and rib bones from a teenager... Nested one inside the other in the box were two gold vessels of unsurpassed workmanship. Beneath these lay three gold armbands, a heavy ring, and...
  • Jerusalem dig finds big gold hoard from 7th century

    12/22/2008 7:58:22 AM PST · by BGHater · 26 replies · 1,152+ views
    Reuters ^ | 22 Dec 2008 | Douglas Hamilton
    Excavations have unearthed a hoard of more than 1,300-year-old gold coins under a car park by the ancient walls of Jerusalem, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said on Monday. Archaeologists said the discovery of the 264 coins, in the ruins of a building dating to about the 7th century, the end of the Byzantine period, was one of the largest coin hoards uncovered in Jerusalem. "We've had pottery, we've had glass, but we've had nothing like this," said British archaeologist Nadine Ross, who found the hoard under a large rock on Sunday, in the fourth and final week of a trip...
  • All transactions to be conducted in the presence of a tax collector

    07/05/2016 4:30:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 22 replies
    SovereignMan.com ^ | April 17, 2012 | simon black
    In the terminal collapse of the Roman Empire, there was perhaps no greater burden to the average citizen than the extreme taxes they were forced to pay. The tax ‘reforms’ of Emperor Diocletian in the 3rd century were so rigid and unwavering that many people were driven to starvation and bankruptcy. The state went so far as to chase around widows and children to collect taxes owed. By the 4th century, the Roman economy and tax structure were so dismal that many farmers abandoned their lands in order to receive public entitlements. At this point, the imperial government was spending...
  • April 16, 2012 Vilnius, Lithuania : $7 Gasoline. Thanks Ben.

    07/05/2016 4:36:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 23 replies
    SovereignMan.com ^ | April 16, 2012 | simon black
    The consistent theme from my travels so far in Europe– the UK, Scandinavia, Lithuania– has been noticeably higher prices. Shockingly so, in some instances. London, where I spent a rather pleasant and rare sunny weekend with friends and colleagues, has gone from being ‘stupid’ pricey, to just plain absurd. Tube prices, taxi fares, food prices, restaurant bills, train fares… it all keeps going up. And to cap it all off, the British government’s VAT increases have ensured that absolutely everyone is paying a little bit more. Here in Lithuania, the buzz around town is the spiraling gasoline prices, which have...
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • Goths Vs.Greeks: Epic battle revealed in newfound text

    06/30/2016 8:01:58 AM PDT · by wildbill · 23 replies
    Fox News ^ | March 2016 | Owen Jarus
    Fragments of an ancient Greek text telling of an invasion of Greece by the Goths during the third century A.D. have been discovered in the Austrian National Library. The text includes a battle fought at the pass of Thermopylae. Researchers used spectral imaging to enhance the fragments, making it possible to read them. The analysis suggests the fragments were copied in the 11th century A.D. and are from a text that was written in the third-century A.D. by an Athens writer named Dexippus.
  • Face of the Greek God Pan

    06/30/2016 8:07:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | October 12, 2015 | Megan Sauter
    In November 2014, the team at Antiochia Hippos, Israel, uncovered an extraordinary artifact -- a large bronze mask of the Greek god Pan (or Faunus in the Roman pantheon)... Weighing more than 11 pounds and measuring nearly 12 inches tall, the Pan mask is made of well-cast bronze. It was discovered outside the walled city of Hippos, Israel -- in a basalt tower with 6.5-foot-wide exterior walls... The Pan mask at Hippos, Israel, is an extraordinary and unique find, but Eisenberg explains that some parallels exist in the archaeological record: Similar masks -- perhaps influenced by the style of theater...
  • Skeletons and Gold Coins Found in Pompeii Shop

    06/24/2016 10:31:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists excavating a shop on the outskirts of Pompeii have found four skeletons, several gold coins, and a necklace pendant, according to an Associated Press report. The skeletons belonged to young people who died in the back of the shop when nearby Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. There was an oven in the shop that the archaeologists believe may have been used to make bronze objects. There is evidence that the shop was targeted by looters seeking treasure after the eruption, but they apparently missed the gold coins and the gold-leaf-foil, flower-shaped pendant. Archaeologists have been excavating a second...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Egyptians hope to find Cleopatra's tomb

    04/15/2009 7:51:41 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 10 replies · 570+ views
    timesonline.co.uk ^ | April 16, 2009 | Sheera Frenkel
    Cleopatra and Mark Antony were immortalised as two of history’s greatest lovers, but their final resting place has always been a mystery. Now archaeologists in Egypt are about to start excavating a site that they believe could conceal their tombs. Zahi Hawass, director of Egypt’s Superior Council for Antiquities, said yesterday that there was evidence to suggest that Cleopatra and Mark Antony were buried together in the complex tunnel system underlying the Tabusiris Magna temple, 17 miles from the city of Alexandria. The dig, which begins next week, could reveal answers to the many myths surrounding the pair — including...