Keyword: russianmeteor

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  • Colombian boffins reconstruct flight path of Russian meteor ( Video Illustration)

    02/27/2013 10:20:27 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies
    The Register (UK) ^ | 27th February 2013 14:46 GMT | Brid-Aine Parnell
    Trajectory apparently began in near-Earth asteroid group ApolloAstroboffins have figured out where the Chelaybinsk meteorite came from using the power of maths and videos shot by witnesses in Russia.Click here for VideoJorge Zuluaga and Ignacio Ferrin of the University of Antioquia in Colombia have come up with a preliminary reconstruction of the orbit of the meteor, which smashed into the city in the Urals completely unexpectedly two weeks ago. By combing through the witness videos and using trigonometry, the astronomers have determined that the meteorite came from the Apollo class of asteroids in our Solar System's space rock belt. The...
  • Where exactly did the Russian meteor come from?

    02/26/2013 4:19:06 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 63 replies
    thewee.comk ^ | 4:22pm EST | Chris Gayomali |
    Poring over crowd-sourced footage, researchers Jorge Zuluaga and Ignacio Ferrin from the University of Antioquia in Medellin, Colombia, were able to use "simple trigonometry to calculate the height, speed, and position of the rock as it fell to Earth," says BBC News. More importantly, the duo was able to find out where Russia's most famous meteor was likely born. Using astronomy software developed by the U.S. Naval Observatory, Zuluaga and Ferrin gathered enough data to trace the meteoroid's origins in outer space. The information included the meteor's relative angle to the horizon, the shadows it cast, and video timestamps of...
  • Russia meteor virtually impossible to see coming - Current and planned efforts focus on larger...

    02/17/2013 1:01:22 AM PST · by neverdem · 40 replies
    Science News ^ | February 15, 2013 | Andrew Grant
    Current and planned efforts focus on larger objects Scientists have begun piecing together the characteristics of the meteor that exploded over Russia on the morning of February 15, using data from seismic instruments that track earthquakes and microphones designed to detect sonic booms from nuclear explosions. Unlike the asteroid DA14, which narrowly but predictably missed Earth later that day, the meteor was too small to detect before its contrail appeared in the dawn skies over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. Yet even an object too small to detect can produce an impressive amount of destruction. The meteor was 15 meters...