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Keyword: saturatedfat

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  • The Big Fat Lie We’ve Been Fed About Our Diet

    05/22/2014 4:47:36 PM PDT · by goodwithagun · 121 replies
    The Fiscal Times ^ | May 22, 2014 | Maureen Mackey
    Be honest: That bacon, egg and cheese breakfast you scarfed down the other day was so delicious you’d love to have it for breakfast every morning. But like so many other health-conscious, weight-watching Americans, you just won’t allow yourself that indulgence. Instead, you opt for the usual low-fat, low-calorie and (oh-so-bland) oatmeal.
  • Saturated Fat and Skepticism

    05/07/2014 2:40:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    National Review Online ^ | May 2014 | Mona Charen
    The scientific community is not immune to politics, bias, and self-interest.The headline looks like a hoax — saturated fat does not cause heart disease — but it’s real. This news is more than just another example of changing health guidelines. It’s a cautionary tale about trusting the scientific consensus. For more than 50 years, the best scientific minds in America assured us that saturated fat was the enemy. Animal fat, we were instructed, was the chief culprit in causing obesity, Type II diabetes, and heart disease. Throughout my adult life, I have conscientiously followed the guidelines dispensed by the health...
  • Say 'No' to Bad Science

    05/06/2014 4:32:36 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 32 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 6, 2014 | Mona Charen
    The headline looks like a hoax-- saturated fat does not cause heart disease -- but it's real. This news is more than just another example of changing health guidelines; it's a cautionary tale about trusting the scientific consensus. For more than 50 years, the best scientific minds in America assured us that saturated fat was the enemy. Animal fat, we were instructed, was the chief culprit in causing obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Throughout my adult life, I have conscientiously followed the guidelines dispensed by the health arbiters of our age. Trusting utterly in the scientific research of...
  • Bacon Is Good for You

    05/04/2014 4:24:46 PM PDT · by kingattax · 100 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 5-4-14 | Peter Wilson
    Those who love rib-eye steaks and double-cream Brie will feel better about their guilty pleasures after reading Nina Teicholz’s article in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal, “The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease.” She writes, for example: Too much whole-grain oatmeal for breakfast and whole-grain pasta for dinner, with fruit snacks in between, add up to a less healthy diet than one of eggs and bacon, followed by fish. Gary Taubes covered some of the same ground in his excellent 2008 book, Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health. Taubes argued...
  • The Questionable Link Between Saturated Fat and Heart Disease

    05/04/2014 12:04:14 PM PDT · by Rusty0604 · 132 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 05/02/2014 | Nina Teicholz
    "Saturated fat does not cause heart disease"—or so concluded a big study published in March in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. How could this be? The very cornerstone of dietary advice for generations has been that the saturated fats in butter, cheese and red meat should be avoided because they clog our arteries. The new study's conclusion shouldn't surprise anyone familiar with modern nutritional science, however. The fact is, there has never been solid evidence for the idea that these fats cause disease. We only believe this to be the case because nutrition policy has been derailed over the...
  • Study Questions Fat and Heart Disease Link

    03/18/2014 8:16:42 AM PDT · by reaganaut1 · 45 replies
    New York Times ^ | MARCH 17, 2014 | ANAHAD O'CONNOR
    <p>Many of us have long been told that saturated fat, the type found in meat, butter and cheese, causes heart disease. But a large and exhaustive new analysis by a team of international scientists found no evidence that eating saturated fat increased heart attacks and other cardiac events.</p>
  • Time to end the war against saturated fat?

    10/23/2013 7:24:23 PM PDT · by Rusty0604 · 79 replies
    LA Times ^ | 10/22/2013 | Melissa Healy
    The British Medical Journal has issued a clarion call to all who want to ward off heart disease: Forget the statins and bring back the bacon (or at least the full-fat yogurt). Saturated fat is not the widow-maker it's been made out to be, writes British cardiologist Aseem Malhotra in a stinging "Observations" column in the BMJ: The more likely culprits are empty carbs and added sugar. He musters a passel of recent research that suggests that the "obsession" with lowering a patients' total cholesterol with statins, and a public health message that has made all sources of saturated fat...
  • Red meat is blamed for one in 10 early deaths

    03/12/2012 4:48:53 PM PDT · by Sub-Driver · 60 replies
    Red meat is blamed for one in 10 early deaths The Department of Health was last night urged to review its guidance on red meat after a study found that eating almost half the daily recommended amount can significantly increase the risk of dying early from cancer and heart disease. By Rebecca Smith, Medical Editor 10:00PM GMT 12 Mar 2012 Small quantities of processed meat such as bacon, sausages or salami can increase the likelihood of dying by a fifth, researchers from Harvard School of Medicine found. Eating steak increases the risk of dying by 12%. The study found that...
  • Move over Atkins: the South Beach Diet is Hot, Hot Hot!

    06/17/2003 8:46:37 AM PDT · by sinkspur · 56 replies · 3,136+ views
    Web MD ^ | 6/17/2003 | John Casey
    The South Beach Diet produces rapid weight loss without counting carbs, fats, or calories. It started out simply enough. Arthur Agatston, MD, a cardiologist, decided to develop an eating plan that would improve the cholesterol and insulin levels of his patients with heart disease. Now, the South Beach diet has grown into something much bigger. That's because the plan Agatston created not only improves cholesterol and insulin levels, but it also has helped many people lose weight. "We've had people lose anywhere from five to 100 pounds on the diet," says Agatston, who is director of the Mount Sinai Cardiac...
  • Atkins Lifestyle Fits Government Guidelines

    01/21/2005 1:25:54 PM PST · by ConservativeBamaFan · 25 replies · 878+ views
    Atkins Nutritionals ^ | January 21, 2005 | Stuart L. Trager, M.D.
    Changing the way the world eats is an ambitious goal. The significant changes in the government’s dietary guidelines are an important step forward and a clear signal that the message Dr. Atkins long championed is increasingly heeded. I’m delighted to see the much-awaited dietary guidelines of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A close look at the recommendations released last week shows how closely these recommendations reflect our efforts to raise carbohydrate awareness and emphasize the importance of weight management. It appears that government officials have listened to the Atkins’...
  • Japan's Kobe beef back on menus

    01/03/2006 11:48:01 AM PST · by billorites · 71 replies · 2,114+ views
    AP ^ | December 30, 2006 | Libby Quaid
    MABANK — For the first time in four years, a gourmet extravagance — authentic Japanese Kobe beef — is allowed back into the United States. The question is whether anyone will care. An American Kobe-style brand has taken its place on restaurant menus. Wagyu cattle began arriving in the United States in the 1990s, often flown over from Japan. They are fattened longer than the average American breed; they live about eight to 14 months longer than U.S. beef cattle. U.S. ranchers often crossbreed them with Angus cattle. The glossy black cows on Meliton Rincon's ranch in Athens are not...
  • Meat may be the reason humans outlive apes

    12/15/2009 6:44:02 PM PST · by Mount Athos · 87 replies · 3,196+ views
    livescience ^ | Dec . 15, 2009 | Charles Q. Choi
    Genetic changes that apparently allow humans to live longer than any other primate may be rooted in a more carnivorous diet. These changes may also promote brain development and make us less vulnerable to diseases of aging, such as cancer, heart disease and dementia. These key differences in lifespan may be due to genes that humans evolved to adjust better to meat-rich diets, biologist Caleb Finch at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles suggested. The oldest known stone tools manufactured by the ancestors of modern humans, which date back some 2.6 million years, apparently helped butcher animal bones....
  • High-protein diet reduces appetite

    09/05/2006 12:57:57 PM PDT · by Mount Athos · 106 replies · 2,845+ views
    News@nature.com ^ | 5 September 2006 | Michael Hopkin
    Eating a high-protein diet can boost the release of a hunger-suppressing hormone, according to new study on mice. The research suggests that a diet rich in protein may be a good way to lose weight and keep it off. Mice fed a protein-heavy diet produced higher levels of an appetite-regulating protein called peptide YY (PYY), which has been linked to reduced appetite in human studies. What's more, the high-protein mice put on less fat than mice on a low-protein regime. The discovery boosts the theory that eating more protein might help to reduce appetite and lead to sustained weight loss,...
  • The War On Fat: Researchers Chew The Fat On Merits Of The Atkins Diet

    08/07/2002 8:48:30 AM PDT · by an amused spectator · 130 replies · 2,090+ views
    USA Today ^ | August 7, 2002 | Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY staff writer
    <p>The Atkins low-carb, high-fat diet is supposed to be simple, but it's raising complex medical and nutrition questions. Now two new studies show that those who follow the diet can lose significant amounts of weight, but other research is raising concerns about the safety of the program, linking it to an increased risk of kidney stones and bone loss.</p>
  • The Cholesterol Myths: Exposing the Fallacy that Saturated Fat and Cholesterol Cause Heart Disease

    10/30/2001 9:25:13 AM PST · by sourcery · 45 replies · 13,962+ views
    Health911.com ^ | Review: [Joel M. Kauffman, Research Professor Chemistry]; Book: [Uffe Ravnskov, M. D., Ph. D.]
    <p>With courage and care Dr. Ravnskov exposes the lack of experimental evidence for the diet-heart theory, which claims that eating less fat and cholesterol will prevent atheroslcerosis (hardening of the arteries) and myocardial infarctions (heart attacks). By examining original peer-reviewed literature, the author finds no support for the diet-heart theory. He gives examples of scientific fraud among efforts to support the theory, including the deliberate selective omission of data points, and the deliberate assignment of subjects in a clinical trial to treatment or to control groups by physicians with the subject's medical records in hand. He shows how the abstract or conclusions of a number of papers are at odds with the actual data in the papers. He demonstrates how the use of one statistical method in preference to another can give a false impression that there is an effect, where there is, in fact, none. He shows how the reporting of differences in fatality rates by per cent reduction (say, a 50% reduction in relative risk) is actually misleading when the actual death rates are quite small in both the treatment and control groups of subjects in diet or drug studies. For example, a treatment that changes the absolute survival rate over a multi-year period from 99.0% to 99.5% represents a 50% reduction in relative risk, from 1% to 0.5% absolute. This is often described in papers as a 50% reduction in death rate. However, when the difference is barely significant statistically, as was often the case, Ravnskov points out that there is no real reason to recommend adoption of the treatment, especially if there are serious side-effects.</p>
  • Meta-analysis evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease

    01/25/2010 10:04:28 PM PST · by Coleus · 27 replies · 969+ views
    American Society for Clinical Nutrition ^ | January 13, 2010 | Patty W Siri-Tarino, Qi Sun, Frank B Hu and Ronald M Krauss
    Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease1,2,3,4,5Patty W Siri-Tarino, Qi Sun, Frank B Hu and Ronald M Krauss1 From the Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute Oakland CA (PWS-TRMK)the Departments of Nutrition (QSFBH)Epidemiology (FBH) Harvard School of Public Health Boston MA. 2 PWS-T and QS contributed equally to this work. 3 The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the National Center for Research Resources (http://www.ncrr.nih.gov) or the National Institutes of Health. 4 Supported by the National Dairy Council (PWS-T and...
  • Nutrigenomics researchers replicate gene interaction with saturated fat

    11/18/2009 7:41:43 AM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies · 682+ views
    Tufts University via physorg.com ^ | November 17th, 2009 | NA
    Tufts University researchers have identified a gene-diet interaction that appears to influence body weight and have replicated their findings in three independent studies. Men and women carrying the CC genotype demonstrated higher body mass index (BMI) scores and a higher incidence of obesity, but only if they consumed a diet high in saturated fat. These associations were seen in the apolipoprotein A-II gene (APOA2) promoter. "We believe this is the first time a gene-diet interaction influencing BMI and obesity has been replicated in as many as three independent study populations," says corresponding and senior author Jose Ordovas, PhD, director of...