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Science (General/Chat)

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  • The Groundfridge Is A Pre-Fab Underground Cellar That Stays Cool Without Electricity

    The Weltevree Groundfridge is an ingenious way to provide an affordable, insulating, cooling and storage system for wine, fruit, vegetables and cheese. The pre-fabricated cellar can hold as much as 20 refrigerators without the use of electricity and uses the insulating effects of the soil and water to keep the temp at between 50° and 53° degrees Farenheit (10 and 12 °Celsius) throughout the year.
  • Bones of Civil War amputees found in 'limb pit'

    06/24/2018 2:34:46 AM PDT · by BBell · 21 replies
    The bullet probably hit the Union soldier as he was fleeing. It may have struck his cartridge box first, which sent it tumbling through the muscle of his right buttock, broke his right leg and buried itself sideways in his thigh bone just below the hip. His buddies probably carried him as they retreated before the storm of Rebel gun and cannon fire. At the field hospital, the harried surgeons probably took a look at him and moved on to those less seriously wounded. After he died, he was laid in a shallow pit with a dead comrade and the...
  • Mystery extinct ape discovered in ancient Chinese imperial tomb

    06/23/2018 4:26:57 PM PDT · by BBell · 22 replies
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/ ^ | 6/22/18 | Mark Molloy
    An entirely new species of ape has been discovered buried in an ancient tomb in central China. The remains of the now-extinct gibbon, which researchers have named Junzi imperialis, were found in a burial chamber in Shaanxi Province that dates back around 2,300 years. Researchers believe it may be the first ape species to have perished as a direct result of human activities such as hunting. “All of the world’s apes - chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and gibbons - are threatened with extinction today due to human activities, but no ape species were thought to have become extinct as a result...
  • Research team uncovers lost images from the 19th century

    06/23/2018 1:40:04 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 22, 2018 by | Jeff Renaud, University of Western Ontario
    Invented in 1839, daguerreotype images were created using a highly polished silver-coated copper plate that was sensitive to light when exposed to an iodine vapour. Subjects had to pose without moving for two to three minutes for the image to imprint on the plate, which was then developed as a photograph using a mercury vapour that was heated. Kozachuk conducts much of her research at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) and previously published results in scientific journals in 2017 and earlier this year. In those articles, the team members identified the chemical composition of the tarnish and how it changed...
  • Fighting sexual harassment in science may mean changing science itself

    06/23/2018 5:56:28 AM PDT · by ETL · 45 replies
    ScienceNews.org ^ | June 22, 2018 | BETHANY BROOKSHIRE
    A recent report highlights just how prevalent harassment is in academic science The #MeToo movement has revealed sexual and gender harassment in every corner of American life. Science hasn’t been immune. High profile cases — such as decades’ worth of complaints against astronomer Geoff Marcy, and allegations that geologist David Marchant verbally and physically abused women scientists in Antarctica — make headlines. But it is the often underreported gender harassment, both serious and subtle, that contributes most to the scope of the problem. And efforts to recruit more women into scientific fields fall awfully flat when those women end up...
  • China Appears To Be Preparing To Deorbit Its Tiangong-2 Space Lab

    06/22/2018 2:25:01 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    space.com ^ | June 21, 2018 | Andrew Jones
    China has lowered the orbit of its Tiangong-2 space lab , likely in preparation for deorbiting the orbital facility and thus averting a similar scenario to the uncontrolled re-entry of Tiangong-1 earlier this year. Tiangong-2 was launched in September 2016 to test advanced life support and refueling and resupply capabilities via the crewed Shenzhou-11 and uncrewed Tianzhou-1 cargo missions, in preparation for constructing a large, modular space station in low Earth orbit. Orbital information published by the U.S. Strategic Command's Joint Force Space Component Command, through the Joint Space Operations Center, indicates that Tiangong-2 has moved from an altitude of around 380...
  • Thirty Years On, How Well Do Global Warming Predictions Stand Up?

    06/22/2018 10:27:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 44 replies
    WSJ ^ | June 21, 2018 7:24 p.m. ET | By Pat Michaels and Ryan Maue
    James Hansen issued dire warnings in the summer of 1988. Today earth is only modestly warmer. James E. Hansen wiped sweat from his brow. Outside it was a record-high 98 degrees on June 23, 1988, as the NASA scientist testified before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources during a prolonged heat wave, which he decided to cast as a climate event of cosmic significance. He expressed to the senators his “high degree of confidence” in “a cause-and-effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming.” With that testimony and an accompanying paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research,...
  • Bedrock in West Antarctica rising at surprisingly rapid rate

    06/22/2018 7:37:36 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    Phys.org ^ | June 21, 2018, | The Ohio State University
    The unexpectedly fast rate of the rising earth may markedly increase the stability of the ice sheet against catastrophic collapse due to ice loss, scientists say. Moreover, the rapid rise of the earth in this area also affects gravity measurements, which implies that up to 10 percent more ice has disappeared in this part of Antarctica than previously assumed. Researchers led by scientists at The Ohio State University used a series of six GPS stations (part of the POLENET-ANET array) attached to bedrock around the Amundsen Sea Embayment to measure its rise in response to thinning ice. The "uplift rate"...
  • New Technique Provides Accurate Dating of Ancient Skeletons

    06/21/2018 4:09:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | June 17, 2018 | European Society of Human Genetics
    Interest in the origins of human populations and their migration routes has increased greatly in recent years. A critical aspect of tracing migration events is dating them. However, the radiocarbon techniques*, that are commonly used to date and analyse DNA from ancient skeletons can be inaccurate and not always possible to apply. Inspired by the Geographic Population Structure model that can track mutations in DNA that are associated with geography, researchers have developed a new analytic method, the Time Population Structure (TPS), that uses mutations to predict time in order to date the ancient DNA. Dr Umberto Esposito... TPS can...
  • Seeds of Success [Kenyan herders turn to ag]

    06/21/2018 1:12:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    US News ^ | June 21, 2017 | Anthony Langat
    As drought kills Kenya’s livestock, some herders are fighting hunger by growing their own grass. At noon in Joseph Kwopin's dry and dusty homestead in Kenya's central Baringo County, a calf shelters from the sweltering sun under a shed made of sticks. The barren ground has no vegetation but for a few shrubs and the red-flowered Carraluma socotrana plant – a rare species whose appearance here could seem cruel given that it isn't edible, even to livestock... According to UNICEF, 2.6 million Kenyans have become food insecure as a result of the lack of rainfall. The Kenya Red Cross reported...
  • Time travel proof: UK sent MYSTERIOUS man to year 2365 in SECRET research operation

    06/21/2018 7:30:13 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 111 replies
    www.express.co.uk ^ | PUBLISHED: 03:30, Thu, Jun 21, 2018 | UPDATED: 05:16, Thu, Jun 21, 2018 | By Matthew Robinson
    A MYSTERIOUS man, who claims to be a former employee of the UK Government, has announced he travelled to the year 2365 after being offered €200,000 by Whitehall to learn about the future and how to make it better. In an online video, the man claims to have worked for the UK Government for most of his adult life, and signed up to test future advanced technology. Commenting on why he decided to partake in the trials, he said: “They offered to pay me over €200,000 to take the job, so I thought it was good for my family.” He...
  • Dogs vs. Cats: Scientists finally reveal which is smarter

    06/21/2018 6:16:37 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 101 replies
    New York Post ^ | June 18, 2018 | Jamie Seidel
    Dogs vs. Cats: Scientists finally reveal which is smarter A dog's bark is only a ruff means of communication. Instead, we should be looking at its wiggles and squirms.Jumping up. Rolling over. Lifting paws.ItÂ’s all the doggie behavior that makes them so endearing.But theyÂ’re actually trying to talk to us.Researchers from the University of Salford in England have been attempting to figure out what man's best friend has been trying to tell us all these years. Their results have been published in the science journal Animal Cognition.TheyÂ’ve identified some 47 different potential gestures they use in an attempt to communicate.TheyÂ’ve...
  • Prehistoric wine discovered in inaccessible caves forces a rethink of ancient Sicilian culture

    06/21/2018 12:08:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    The Conversation US (Creative Commons license) ^ | February 13, 2018 | Davide Tanasi
    Monte Kronio rises 1,300 feet above the geothermally active landscape of southwestern Sicily. Hidden in its bowels is a labyrinthine system of caves, filled with hot sulfuric vapors. At lower levels, these caves average 99 degrees Fahrenheit and 100 percent humidity. Human sweat cannot evaporate and heat stroke can result in less than 20 minutes of exposure to these underground conditions. Nonetheless, people have been visiting the caves of Monte Kronio since as far back as 8,000 years ago. They’ve left behind vessels from the Copper Age (early sixth to early third millennium B.C.) as well as various sizes of...
  • 4,000-Year-Old Jar Contains Italy's Oldest Olive Oil

    06/20/2018 11:40:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 1, 2018 | Laura Geggel
    An egg-shaped ceramic jar covered with ceramic "rope" once held a prize delicacy: the oldest olive oil on record in Italy... Researchers made the discovery after analyzing residue of the so-called liquid gold on the beautiful jar and two other vessels uncovered at Castelluccio, an archaeological site in Sicily. "It had the signature of Sicilian tableware dated to the end of the third and beginning of the second millennium B.C., [during the] Early Bronze Age," Davide Tanasi, an assistant professor of history at the University of South Florida, said in a statement. "We wanted to learn how it was used,...
  • Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before Greek philosopher was born, experts

    06/20/2018 2:55:37 PM PDT · by BBell · 41 replies
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/ ^ | 6/20/18 | Sarah Knapton
    Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before Greek philosopher was born, say experts The builders of Britain’s ancient stone circles like Stonehenge were using Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before the Greek philosopher was born, experts have claimed. A new book, Megalith, has re-examined the ancient geometry of Neolithic monuments and concluded they were constructed by sophisticated astronomers who understood lengthy lunar, solar and eclipse cycles and built huge stone calendars using complex geometry One contributor, megalithic expert Robin Heath has even proposed that there exists a great Pythagorean triangle in the British landscape linking Stonehenge, the site from which...
  • Why Do Genes Suggest Most Men Died Off 7,000 Years Ago?

    06/20/2018 12:59:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 110 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 6, 2018 | Yasemin Saplakoglu
    Modern men's genes suggest that something peculiar happened 5,000 to 7,000 years ago: Most of the male population across Asia, Europe and Africa seems to have died off, leaving behind just one man for every 17 women. This so-called population "bottleneck" was first proposed in 2015, and since then, researchers have been trying to figure out what could've caused it. One hypothesis held that the drop-off in the male population occurred due to ecological or climatic factors that mainly affected male offspring, while another idea suggested that the die-off happened because some males had more power in society, and thus...
  • Former astronaut doubts that NASA or SpaceX will make it to Mars with their shiny new rockets

    06/20/2018 12:51:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    BGR ^ | June 19th, 2018 at 10:52 AM | Mike Wehner
    Chris Hadfield, who flew to the International Space Station as part of the Canadian Space Agency, told Business Insider that making it to Mars is going to take technology that has yet to be conceived. Put simply, he doesn’t believe the new rockets being worked on by NASA, SpaceX, or Blue Origin have much chance of fulfilling their stated goals. “Personally, I don’t think any of those three rockets is taking people to Mars,” Hadfield said regarding the SpaceX Big Falcon Rocket, Blue Origin’s New Glenn, and NASA’s Space Launch System being constructed by Boeing. “I don’t think those are...
  • How to decorate like a Viking

    06/20/2018 11:02:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | June 19, 2018 | Vickie Isabella Westen, Translated by Catherine Jex
    The Viking Age was probably far more colourful than you might think, says conservator Line Bregnhøi from the National Museum of Denmark, and co-author on the new report... Bregnhøi and her colleague Lars Holten have used the advanced techniques now available to create the colour palette used in the reconstruction of the largest Viking building discovered in Denmark. The Royal Hall, as the building is called, was reconstructed at the Centre for Historical-Archaeological Research and Communication in Denmark (as also known as Sagnlandet Lejre). It uses the same type of paint used by upper class Vikings. However, the archaeologists behind...
  • Did Plate Tectonics Set the Stage for Life on Earth?

    06/20/2018 9:33:45 AM PDT · by ETL · 37 replies
    Space.com ^ | June 19, 2018 | Lisa Kaspin-Powell, Astrobiology Magazine
    A new study suggests that rapid cooling within the Earth's mantle through plate tectonics played a major role in the development of the first life forms, which in turn led to the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere. The study was published in the March 2018 issue of Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Scientists at the University of Adelaide and Curtin University in Australia, and the University of California at Riverside, California, USA, gathered and analyzed data on igneous rocks from geological and geochemical data repositories in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States. They found that over the...
  • Could aliens harness stars to keep ahead of expanding universe?

    06/20/2018 8:29:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 70 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 20, 2018 | by Bob Yirka
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain _____________________________________________________________________________ Dan Hooper, a senior scientist with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has written a paper outlining a way future aliens could keep their civilizations alive in spite of the isolation due to an expanding universe. In his paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, he suggests they might consider collecting and storing stars. A Dyson sphere is a theoretical structure able to house a star. Originally proposed by Freeman Dyson, the sphere was originally envisioned as a group of satellites completely encompassing a star to capture all of its energy. That energy could then be...