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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Stanford archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at... Deir el-Medina

    11/23/2014 3:17:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Stanford Report ^ | November 17, 2014 | Barbara Wilcox
    In many bodies Austin saw evidence of stress from the hard climb – today it's a thousand stone steps – from Deir el-Medina to the Valley of the Kings and back again. As Austin found, incidence of arthritis in the knees and ankles of the men at Deir el-Medina was significantly higher than for working populations from other Egyptian cemeteries. The bones also revealed clues that corroborate other scholars' findings that severely disabled Egyptians were well cared for. "I found the remains of a man who died at the age of 19 or 20 and was born without a useful...
  • Thousands of ancient artifacts uncovered at awesome Mexican temple

    11/23/2014 2:24:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Houston Chronicle ^ | November 5, 2014 | Heather Alexander
    Mexican archaeologists exploring one of the country's most spectacular ancient temples have uncovered a stash of thousands of artifacts that are estimated to date back as far as 200 A.D. The Temple of the Feathered Serpent sits on the outskirts of Mexico City. The new Lazgo Hal Tladocan project to explore tunnels beneath it is one of the most important archaeological investigations Mexico has ever seen. Sculptures carved in stone, ornamented with pre-Columbian jewelry and elaborate jade and greenstone were found. Unique objects made of amber and thousands of wooden artifacts were also uncovered, hidden along with remains of animals,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Solar Flare from a Sharper Sun

    11/23/2014 11:38:14 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | November 22, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Solar active region AR2192 was the largest recorded sunspot group of the last 24 years. Before rotating off the Earth-facing side of the Sun at the end of October, it produced a whopping six energetic X-class flares. Its most intense flare was captured on October 24 in this stunning view from the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory. The scene is a color combination of images made at three different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light; 193 angstroms shown in blue, 171 angstroms in white, and 304 angstroms in red. The emission, from highly ionized Iron and Helium atoms, traces magnetic field...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M1: The Crab Nebula

    11/23/2014 11:14:59 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | November 21, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Crab Nebula is cataloged as M1, the first object on Charles Messier's famous 18th century list of things which are not comets. In fact, the Crab is now known to be a supernova remnant, debris from the death explosion of a massive star, witnessed by astronomers in the year 1054. This sharp, ground-based telescopic view uses narrowband data to track emission from ionized oxygen and hydrogen atoms (in blue and red) and explore the tangled filaments within the still expanding cloud. One of the most exotic objects known to modern astronomers, the Crab Pulsar, a neutron star spinning...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- LDN 988: Dark Nebula in Cygnus

    11/23/2014 11:11:15 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | November 20, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Obscuring the rich starfields of northern Cygnus, dark nebula LDN 988 lies near the center of this cosmic skyscape. Composed with telescope and camera, the scene is some 2 degrees across. That corresponds to 70 light-years at the estimated 2,000 light-year distance of LDN 988. Stars are forming within LDN 988, part of a larger complex of dusty molecular clouds along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy sometimes called the Northern Coalsack. In fact, nebulosities associated with young stars abound in the region, including variable star V1331 Cygni shown in the inset. At the tip of a long...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Bright Spiral Galaxy M81

    11/23/2014 11:07:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | November 19, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky is similar in size to our Milky Way Galaxy: big, beautiful M81. This grand spiral galaxy can be found toward the northern constellation of the Great Bear (Ursa Major). This superbly detailed view reveals M81's bright yellow nucleus, blue spiral arms, and sweeping cosmic dust lanes with a scale comparable to the Milky Way. Hinting at a disorderly past, a remarkable dust lane actually runs straight through the disk, to the left of the galactic center, contrary to M81's other prominent spiral features. The errant dust lane may be the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Star Formation in the Tadpole Nebula

    11/23/2014 10:51:40 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | November 18, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula. Notable near the image center are two relatively dense streamers of material trailing away from the nebula's central regions. Potentially sites of ongoing star formation in IC 410, these cosmic tadpole shapes are about 10 light-years long....
  • What is "Sin"? (Vanity)

    11/23/2014 5:12:09 AM PST · by BwanaNdege · 95 replies
    Self | 11/23/2014 | BwanaNdege
    Hello Freepers! I need help with research for a paper. Your ideas are needed and welcomed. I especially would appreciate comments from Libertarians and any lurking Liberals/Progressives and Atheists/"Brights".
  • How Players at MIT Engineered a Football Team

    11/22/2014 11:23:48 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 15 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 11-21-14 | Ben Cohen
    This Season, the Engineers Are Going to Playoffs, but They Once Competed in Hand-Me-Downs CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—In the 1970s, on this campus known for scientific innovation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology students engineered a rather unlikely experiment: a football team. MIT had no intercollegiate football squad at the time. The student body in 1901 voted 119-117 to discontinue it. So one day in 1978, a group of MIT students huddled and created a team that would play its first game that fall. No one else at the school had any clue. There were times when fielding a football team at MIT seemed...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Double Dust Disks of HD 95086

    11/22/2014 11:08:37 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 17, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What do other star systems look like? To help find out, astronomers are carrying out detailed observations of nearby stars in infrared light to see which have dust disks that might be forming planets. Observations by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and ESA's Herschel Space Observatory have found that planetary system HD 95086 has two dust disks: a hot one near the parent star and a cooler one farther out. An artist's illustration of how the system might appear is featured here, including hypothetical planets with large rings that orbit between the disks. The planets may have created the large...
  • The Whichness of the Why — Another asteroid has been detected sporting a long tail.

    11/22/2014 12:31:05 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 6 replies
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | November 21, 2014 | by Stephen Smith
    Asteroid 62412. Credit: Scott Sheppard Comets are often called “dirty snowballs” by astronomers. However, various investigative missions, such as Giotto and Deep Impact, revealed them to be blackened, cratered, and fractured. No ice fields, reflective crust, or watery clouds were observed. Indeed, the latest pictures from the Rosetta mission of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko indicate that it is a mountain of rock in space. According to a recent press release, the Gemini Observatory’s image of asteroid 62412, located between Mars and Jupiter, is the first time that one of the Hygiea family of asteroids has exhibited a tail, and is only the...
  • Throwback Thursday: Seeing through our galaxy

    11/21/2014 10:58:31 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 7 replies
    Medium ^ | 11/20/14 | Ethan Siegel
    When we look out at the Universe, our view is pretty consistently dominated by the stars within our own galaxy. Although we know that many interesting things lie beyond — globular clusters, individual galaxies, and rich clusters and superclusters of galaxies — being in the Milky Way makes it very hard to see a great many of them. This is because our own galaxy, from our vantage point within it, dominates a huge fraction of the sky overhead. Image credit: Richard Payne, of Arizona Astrophotography.The plane of the Milky Way itself obscures about a total of 20% of our night sky. What appears...
  • Have an HDTV? Use this neat trick to unlock better picture quality

    11/21/2014 4:56:48 PM PST · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    Komando.com ^ | November 19, 2014 | Kim Komando
    ... Calibrating your HDTV doesn't have to cost as much as the TV itself. A calibration disc is a thrifty way to get professional-grade results for less. What's a calibration disc? It's a disc that holds information for tweaking your HDTV's color and brightness levels. You don't have to buy a calibration disc, though - you can make your own with a free download from AVS. Not only is it free, it comes with a support staff in AVS's knowledgeable forum ...
  • James Bond-inspired LASER WATCH will burn through objects from a distance

    11/21/2014 10:42:47 AM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    Mirror (UK) ^ | Nov 21, 2014 12:21 | By Andy Dawson
    Hobbyist Patrick Priebe has created a terrifyingly awesome laser watch that will burn through objects from afar The Apple Watch is already obsolete and it isn't even in the shops yet. The reason is simple – it doesn't contain a laser that can actually burn stuff. If that's what you're looking for in a smartwatch, forget about Apple and look towards the work of hobbyist Patrick Priebe. He's knocked together what he describes as the "Bond-inspired laser watch" and it might well consign the Apple Watch to the bin of history. That's because this isn't just some laser pointer that...
  • 141 year old cold weather record falls in Jacksonville ( Florida )

    11/21/2014 6:34:48 AM PST · by george76 · 18 replies
    WJXT ^ | Nov 20 2014 | Blake Mathews
    24 degrees breaks old record of 30 set in 1873. Thursday morning not only broke an "ancient" record from 1873, but we also dropped to the second coldest temperature ever recorded in the month of November in Jacksonville. According to the National Weather Service, for the second morning in a row, Jacksonville set a new cold weather record. Thursday mornings temperature dropped to a bone chilling 24 degrees breaking the old record of 30 degrees set in 1873. If that wasn't cold enough for you, Thursday's 24 degrees also marks the second lowest temperature ever recorded in the month of...
  • Anything Goes — Science advances through irrational methods.

    11/21/2014 1:16:47 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 48 replies
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | Nov 18, 2014 | Stephen Smith
    “I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.” — Thomas Jefferson “Dissention” by Cory Ench It is a common perception that “we stand on the shoulders of giants”: that is, new ideas are based on those inherited from older investigations. If that is the case, then there is a serious hinderance inherent in the approach. The title of this article is borrowed from Paul Feyerabend, a self-described “epistemological anarchist”, who promulgated an irreverent view of science. It is necessary,...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Three Ancient Greek Mosaics in the Ongoing Excavation in Zeugma, Turkey

    11/20/2014 11:15:08 PM PST · by ApplegateRanch · 18 replies
    Laughing Squid ^ | November 18, 2014 | Rebecca Escamilla
    The Zeugma excavation project conducted by Oxford Archaeology and supported by Packhard Humanities Institute and the Ministry of Culture of Turkey has recently unearthed three ancient Greek mosaics in the Turkish city of Zeugma. Zeugma had received some press and support in 2000 after flooding caused by construction began to bury and damage artifacts in the region. The mosaics, created in the 2nd century BC, are constructed of boldly colored glass and are being covered for protection until excavation is complete. The head of the project, Professor Kutalmis Görkay, recently gave the Hurriyet Daily News more details about the plan...
  • BICEP2 All Over Again? Researchers Place Higgs Boson Discovery in Doubt

    11/20/2014 2:26:16 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 20, 2014 | Tim Reyes
    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe, faster is better. Faster means more powerful particle collisions and looking deeper into the makeup of matter. However, other researchers are proclaiming not so fast. LHC may not have discovered the Higgs Boson, the boson that imparts mass to everything, the god particle as some have called it. While the Higgs Boson discovery in 2012 culminated with the awarding in December 2013 of the Nobel Prize to Peter Higgs and François Englert, a team of researchers has raised these doubts about the Higgs Boson in their paper published in the journal Physical...
  • Quicky Mid-November 2014 ENSO Update--AUSTRALIA’S BOM UPGRADES ENSO TRACKER STATUS TO EL NIŃO ALERT

    11/20/2014 1:54:32 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 2 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | November 19, 2014 | Bob Tisdale
    Guest Post by Bob TisdaleAUSTRALIA’S BOM UPGRADES ENSO TRACKER STATUS TO EL NIŃO ALERTOn November 18, Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) upgraded the conditions in the tropical Pacific from El Nińo “watch” to “alert” levels, “indicating at least a 70% chance of El Nińo occurring”.  See the rest of their update here.NOAA’S WEEKLY NINO3.4 DATA The sea surface temperature anomalies of the NINO3.4 region of the equatorial Pacific are a commonly used ENSO index. NOAA’s Oceanic NINO Index is a form of the data of that region. According to NOAA’s weekly sea surface temperature data for the NINO3.4 region, as of...
  • Germany gives up on emissions target. Japan emits more CO2 than ever

    11/20/2014 1:42:05 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies
    joannenova.com.au ^ | November 18th, 2014 | | Breitbart- London
    So much for momentum on climate change. Reality bites. Without nuclear power, Japans emissions have hit a new record high. At the same time, even with 17% of its energy from Nuclear power, and with 23,000 wind turbines, Germany stands no chance of reaching its emissions targets. The rich, technologically advanced nation that has spent more than any other on green energy admits they’ve failed. Those who want to stop producing CO2 have billions of dollars to spend on advertising and pointless windmills, but in the end, chemistry and physics can’t be bought. If renewables could provide cheap reliable power,...
  • Remembering Arthur Balfour, Friend of Science and Friendly Opponent to Atheist Bertrand Russell

    11/20/2014 12:31:46 PM PST · by Heartlander · 1 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | November 20, 2014 | Mike Keas
    Remembering Arthur Balfour, Friend of Science and Friendly Opponent to Atheist Bertrand Russell Mike Keas November 20, 2014 11:28 AM | Permalink This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I -- and this past week provided a terrible reminder that conflicts stirred by the war remain with us. In Israel, a pair of Palestinian Muslims turned a Jerusalem synagogue at morning prayers into a bloodbath, a reminder to Israelis (as if one were needed) of their vulnerability to terrorists fanatically opposed to the existence of the state. Observers with a long memory may have recalled...
  • Researchers, Ahoy! Should Futurist Science Move… Offshore?

    11/20/2014 11:06:48 AM PST · by Mellonkronos · 13 replies
    Transhumanity.net ^ | November 9, 2014 | Nikki Olson
    Interesting here to see transhumanists again talking about moving offshore—literally!—to avoid government regulations. -- Mellonkronos “Researchers, Ahoy! Should Futurist Science Move… Offshore?" By Nikki Olson November 9, 2014 http://transhumanity.net/researchers-ahoy-should-futurist-science-move-offshore/ What is the likelihood of seeing research vessels devoted to scientific research outside the bounds of national jurisdiction? The idea of relocating for the sake of circumventing law, in particular the notion of establishing new nations in international waters, is an idea typically initiated with liberty in mind. The Principality of Sealand, for instance, established in 1967, was founded with the intention of creating a space free from “oppressive laws and...
  • More details of Apple’s GT Advanced sapphire deal make it crystal clear how things fell apart

    11/20/2014 2:47:17 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 19 replies
    9to5Mac ^ | November 19, 2014 | MIKE BEASLEY
    The Wall Street Journal has revealed key details of the failed deal between Apple and sapphire supplier GT Advanced Technologies that show why the agreement collapsed and how GT managed to run itself into bankruptcy while trying to meet Apple’s standards. A previous report from the Journal revealed that GTAT had been unable to provide the iPhone 6 displays it had promised Apple, but now we have even more information on why that demand was so hard to meet. Originally Apple intended to buy the massive new sapphire furnaces GTAT had designed, but eventually Apple decided to simply ask GTAT...
  • What is the Difference Between Asteroids and Comets?

    11/19/2014 1:44:17 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 19, 2014 | Nancy Atkinson
    Asteroids and comets have a few things in common. They are both celestial bodies orbiting our Sun, and they both can have unusual orbits, sometimes straying close to Earth or the other planets. They are both “leftovers” — made from materials from the formation of our Solar System 4.5 billion years ago. But there are a few notable differences between these two objects, as well. The biggest difference between comets and asteroids, however, is what they are made of. While asteroids consist of metals and rocky material, comets are made up of ice, dust, rocky materials and organic compounds. When...
  • CERN scientists discover 2 new subatomic particles

    11/19/2014 6:22:18 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies
    ABC News ^ | Nov 19, 2014, 7:20 AM ET | JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press
    Scientists at the world's largest smasher said Wednesday they have discovered two new subatomic particles never seen before that could widen our understanding of the universe. An experiment using the European Organization for Nuclear Research's Large Hadron Collider found the new particles, which were predicted to exist, and are both baryons made from three quarks bound together by a strong force.
  • Chelyabinsk meteor #2? Massive flash over Russia’s Urals stuns locals & scientists

    11/18/2014 7:38:30 PM PST · by traumer · 48 replies
    An extraordinary bright orange flash has lit up the sky in Russia’s Sverdlovsk region in the Urals. While locals captured the massive ‘blast’ on numerous cameras, both scientists and emergency services still struggle to explain the unusual event. Dark evening skies in the town of Rezh in Sverdlovsk region near Russia's Ekaterinburg turned bright orange for some ten seconds on November 14, with the event being caught on several cameras by the locals. A driver filmed the massive flash with his dashcam, later posting the video on YouTube, with more people commenting they’ve seen it too. Teenagers in the town...
  • Philae Lander Early Science Results: Ice, Organic Molecules and Half a Foot of Dust

    11/18/2014 2:42:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | November 18, 2014 | Bob King
    With just 60 hours of battery power, the lander drilled, hammered and gathered science data on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko before going into hibernation. Despite appearances, the comet’s hard as ice. The team responsible for the MUPUS (Multi-Purpose Sensors for Surface and Sub-Surface Science) instrument hammered a probe as hard as they could into 67P’s skin but only dug in a few millimeters: “Although the power of the hammer was gradually increased, we were not able to go deep into the surface,” said Tilman Spohn ... “If we compare the data with laboratory measurements, we think that the probe...
  • Forced vaccinations for medical providers

    11/18/2014 2:34:08 PM PST · by grumpygresh · 29 replies
    e-mail | 07/17/14 | Juli Kotke
    November 17, 2014 Dear Physician, Each year, influenza results in an estimated 226,000 hospital admissions and 36,000 deaths. As you know, unimmunized individuals infected with influenza may be asymptomatic but still contagious and able to infect others. Health care personnel who are not immunized can unintentionally expose patients to seasonal influenza. Reducing influenza transmission from health care personnel to patients is a top priority both nationally and in Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Healthcare Influenza Prevention Coalition, a group comprised of the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA), Wisconsin Medical Society (the Society), LeadingAge Wisconsin, Wisconsin Health Care Association (WHCA)/Wisconsin Center for Assisted Living...
  • Michelin Putting Tweel Airless Tire Into Production

    11/18/2014 12:17:51 PM PST · by Idaho_Cowboy · 51 replies
    Yahoo Autos ^ | November 18, 2014 | Stephen Edelstein
    Combining a tire and wheel into a single airless 'tweel' has proven to be a popular concept, although it still hasn't gone mainstream. Michelin is the latest company to announce a production tweel, but not for any automotive applications—just yet. It will open a dedicated tweel-producing factory in Piedmont, South Carolina, this week. However these airless tires will be used on skid-steer loaders and certain models of John Deere lawnmower, not cars.
  • All 50 states have below freezing temperatures (11/18 a.m.)

    11/18/2014 11:02:01 AM PST · by CedarDave · 40 replies
    Watts Up With That? ^ | November 18, 2014 | Tim Buckley, WFMY-TV Meteorologist
    Meteorologist Tim Buckley of WFMY-TV writes on Facebook: All 50 states have low temperatures BELOW freezing tonight. (Monday night) Yes, even Hawaii. Tall mountain peaks there regularly get below freezing, and even get snow. This typically happens a few times during winter, but is very rare this early in the season. Pretty neat!
  • Canadian Federal Byelections Reject Climate Alarmism and Social Engineering

    11/18/2014 7:59:09 AM PST · by rktman · 13 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 11/18/2014 | Sierra Rayne
    Voters aren't buying climate hysteria and left-wing efforts to reduce personal freedoms.
  • 'Science shattered': Hand of God suddenly revealed?

    'Everything we think we know about our universe is wrong' In the late 1800s, Albert A. Michelson, the first American to win the Nobel Prize in the sciences, devised an experiment to prove the Earth is moving through space, through a medium for bearing light called the “aether.” If he could show that light was slowed down by being fired into an aether headwind, like a swimmer swimming against a stream, Michelson reasoned, it would prove the Earth’s motion through space. But the experiment didn’t work the way he expected. In fact, it proved the opposite. The world of science...
  • Spike Psarris on the Big Bang on RSR

    11/18/2014 2:31:58 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 4 replies
    Real Science Radio ^ | Nov 14, 2014 | Bob Enyart, Spike Psarris
    Real Science Radio host Bob Enyart interviews astronomy video producer Spike Psarris on the big problems with the big bang.
  • Critic of Polygraph Tests Accused of Teaching People to Lie to Government

    11/17/2014 4:08:52 PM PST · by rednesss · 22 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | 11/17/2014 | Jacob Gershman
    For at least the second time since 2012, the federal government has brought criminal charges, accusing someone of training people on how to beat a polygraph test. On Friday, prosecutors announced an indictment against Douglas G. Williams, a 69-year-old man from Norman, Okla., who’s accused of coaching people “how to lie and conceal crimes” during federally administered lie-detector tests. Mr. Williams, who operates a company called Polygraph.com, says the mail fraud and obstruction of justice charges leveled against him are an “attack on his First Amendment rights.” The indictment follows the federal prosecution of an Indiana man who received eight...
  • Chaotic Wombs May Birth Wrong-way Planets

    11/17/2014 9:39:21 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 17, 2014 | Shannon Hall
    We’ve heard it time and time again. When it comes to new exoplanet findings, our conventional wisdom never holds. So the surprise that a batch of extrasolar planets are moving retrograde, orbiting in directions opposite to the way their stars are spinning, shouldn’t come as a surprise. Then again, maybe it should. These discoveries turned the long-standing view of how planets form on its head. Now Eduard Vorobyov at the University of Vienna and colleagues argue that chaotic conditions in the planetary system’s gaseous wombs may be to blame. Theorists have long assumed that stars and their planetary companions assemble...
  • This Is What It's Like To Be Shot At With an AK-47 in a Mercedes-Benz!

    11/17/2014 7:11:30 AM PST · by Enlightened1 · 27 replies
    This Is What It's Like To Be Shot At With an AK 47 in a Mercedes Benz!
  • Can Anarcho-Capitalism Work?

    11/17/2014 4:31:58 AM PST · by Pan_Yan · 22 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 11/16/2014 | Llewellyn Rockwell
    This talk was delivered at the Costa Mesa Mises Circle on Society Without the State, November 8, 2014. The term “anarcho-capitalism” has, we might say, rather an arresting quality. But while the term itself may jolt the newcomer, the ideas it embodies are compelling and attractive, and represent the culmination of a long development of thought. If I had to boil it down to a handful of insights, they would be these: (1) each human being, to use John Locke’s formulation, “has a property in his own person”; (2) there ought to be a single moral code binding all people,...
  • Climatologist: 30-Year Cold Spell Strikes Earth

    11/17/2014 12:06:54 AM PST · by wille777 · 47 replies
    Newsmax ^ | 11/16/14 | Clayton B. Reid
    Casey says the evidence is clear that the earth is rapidly growing colder because of diminished solar activity. He says trends indicate we could be headed for colder temperatures similar to those seen in the late 1700s and early 1800s when the sun went into a "solar minimum" — a phenomenon with significantly reduced solar activity, including solar flares and sunspot. .... If "Dark Winter" is right, that means the nation is busily preparing for the wrong calamity. "We don't have 10 years," Casey warns. "We've squandered during President Obama's administration eight years . . . and we didn't have...
  • 54 Australian Men 'Gave Birth' Last Year

    11/16/2014 3:39:41 PM PST · by PROCON · 45 replies
    breitbart ^ | Nov. 16, 2014 | Donna Rachel Edmunds
    54 men have given birth in Australia in the last year alone, according to figures released by Medicare. A number of people identifying as men have also accessed abortions, the figures revealed. The trend for transsexual men to give birth has been growing ever since the first birth to a 'father', American transsexual Thomas Beatie, in 2007, according to the MailOnline. Medicare in Australia recently decided to allow people to elect their own gender on documents instead of being forced to identify with the sex they were born. The change has revealed a trend for transgender men to keep their...
  • Are you a "believer" a "denier" ... or an "agnostic"?

    11/16/2014 12:22:47 PM PST · by zencycler · 47 replies
    self | 11/16/2014 | self
    Are you a "believer" a "denier" ... or an "agnostic"? When you put together a large group of people who are all certain that they can predict what will happen 100 years from now, a group that demonizes those who stray even a little from their beliefs, a group claiming that if everyone follows them, we will be saved, but if they don't we will be doomed - then in most cases, that group is called a religion. Like most religions, this group also elevates the importance of mankind, so much so that humans are viewed as having more power...
  • Pavlof Volcano

    11/16/2014 10:02:13 AM PST · by JimSEA · 7 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 2014 | Hobart King
    Pavlof is one of the most active volcanoes in North America. In the past 100 years, Pavlof has erupted at least 24 times and may have erupted on several other occasions. The remote location and weather with limited visibility, combined with the fact that there are few local inhabitants, may have allowed some eruptions to go unconfirmed. Today, daily satellite monitoring and real-time data from instruments around the volcano bring a continuous stream of information to scientists. [1] Although there is very little human activity on the land immediately surrounding Pavlof, the sky above is heavily travelled. Each day at...
  • Hallucinogenic Plants May Be Key to Decoding Ancient Southwestern Paintings, Expert Says

    11/16/2014 9:42:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    Western Digs ^ | October 17, 2014 | Blake de Pastino
    Dozens of rock art sites in southern New Mexico, recently documented for the first time, are revealing unexpected botanical clues that archaeologists say may help unlock the meaning of the ancient abstract paintings. Over a swath of the Chihuahuan Desert stretching from Carlsbad to Las Cruces, at least 24 rock art panels have been found bearing the same distinctive pictographs: repeated series of triangles painted in combinations of red, yellow, and black. And at each of these sites, archaeologists have noticed similarities not just on the rock, but in the ground. Hallucinogenic plants were found growing beneath the triangle designs,...
  • US scientists may have resolved 'Darwin's dilemma'

    11/16/2014 8:04:49 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 262 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/15/2014 | By Matt Cantor
    Charles Darwin worried about a possible hole in his theory of evolution, but some American scientists may just have plugged it. For about a billion years after the dawn of life on Earth, organisms didn't evolve all that much. Then about 600 million years ago came the "Cambrian explosion." Everything changed relatively quickly, with all kinds of plants and animals emerging—which doesn't quite seem to fit with Darwin's theory of slow change, hence "Darwin's dilemma." Now, within a few days of each other, two new studies have appeared that could explain the shift, ABC News reports. One, by scientists at...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Leonids Above Torre de la Guaita [1999]

    11/16/2014 3:33:42 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | November 16, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Leonids Meteor Shower came to an impressive crescendo in 1999. Observers in Europe saw a sharp peak in the number of meteors visible around 0210 UTC during the early morning hours of November 18. Meteor counts then exceeded 1000 per hour - the minimum needed to define a true meteor storm. At other times and from other locations around the world, observers typically reported respectable rates of between 30 and 100 meteors per hour. This photograph is a 20-minute exposure ending just before the main Leonids peak began. Visible are at least five Leonid meteors streaking high above the...
  • Brian Cox visits the world's biggest vacuum chamber - Human Universe:BBC Two

    11/15/2014 6:04:26 PM PST · by TurboZamboni · 24 replies
    you tube ^ | 10-24-14 | bbc
    Your physics teacher always told you this was true. You've never seen it until now. A lot of Newtonian physics happens in this hypothetical world where no outside forces act upon an object. But Earth isn't a vacuum, and outside forces are acting on objects all the time! Now, for the first time, you can see proof of what your physics teacher was telling you right in front of your eyes. Brian Cox visits NASA’s Space Power Facility in Ohio to see what happens when a bowling ball and a feather are dropped together under the conditions of outer space.
  • Claim: Warmest oceans ever recorded

    11/15/2014 5:36:31 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 45 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | November 14, 2014 | Anthony Watts
    From the University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST“This summer has seen the highest global mean sea surface temperatures ever recorded since their systematic measuring started. Temperatures even exceed those of the record-breaking 1998 El Niño year,” says Axel Timmermann, climate scientist and professor, studying variability of the global climate system at the International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa.From 2000-2013 the global ocean surface temperature rise paused, in spite of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. This period, referred to as the Global Warming Hiatus, raised a lot of public and scientific interest. However, as of April 2014 ocean warming has...
  • Scientists Have Finally Made It To The Bottom Of One Of The Mysterious Siberian Holes

    11/15/2014 5:18:24 PM PST · by cripplecreek · 67 replies
    Business Insider ^ | Nov 13 2014 | Peter Farquhar
    Scientists have finally descended into one of the three enormous holes that mysteriously opened up in Siberia several months ago. The holes, on Russia’s Yamal Pensinsula, captured attention after one was first spotted by an aircraft pilot in July, who took this pic: The world went mad. Suspected causes ranged from meteorites to underground explosions to extra-terrestrial. Now a team from the Russian Centre of Arctic Exploration has climbed down to the bottom of the largest hole, about 16m, to stand on a frozen lake which itself is about another 10.5m deep. The team had to brave winter temperatures of...
  • Archaeologists unearth 5,000-year-old footprints [Denmark]

    11/15/2014 5:07:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Copenhagen Post ^ | November 10, 2014 | Magnus Strřyer Rasmussen
    Archaeologists working on the excavations for the Femern Bćlt Tunnel have discovered several well-preserved footprints dating back to the Stone Age. The prints were left by fishermen looking to safeguard their weirs (river barriers used for fishing) in a storm 5,000 years ago, announced Lolland-Falster Museum. "It is quite surreal to have found human footprints," said archaeologist Terje Stafseth in a press release. "We normally find historical clues in the form of human waste, but here we have found an entirely different clue and a first in Danish archaeology: a physical print left behind by a human." Prints belonged to...
  • Mycenean artifacts found in Bodrum [Halicarnassus]

    11/15/2014 4:54:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Hürriyet Daily ^ | Saturday, November 15 2014 | Mugla -- Anadolu Agency
    New artifacts have been found during excavations in Bodrum’s Ortakent and Gümüşlük neighborhoods. The artifacts will shed light on the history of Bodrum Peninsula, according to officials. The Bodrum Underwater Archaeology Museum Director Emel Özkan said that they had discovered 49 artifacts from the Mycenean era. “The number of Mycenean artifacts increased to 248 with these ones. This made our museum the richest one in terms of Mycenean artifacts among the Turkish museums,” she said. Özkan said that the artifacts, which date back to 3,500 years ago, were very important for Anatolian history, adding, “The amphora and gifts found in...
  • Archaeologists Investigate Underground Pyramidal Structure Beneath Orvieto, Italy

    11/15/2014 4:41:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Tue, Nov 11, 2014 | editors
    Calling it the "cavitá" ('hole' or 'hollow' in Italian), or hypogeum, the archaeologists have thus far excavated about 15 meters down. They marked their third year at the site in 2014. By then they had uncovered significant amounts of what they classify as Gray and Black bucchero, commonware, and Red and Black Figure pottery remains. They have dated deposits to the middle to the end of the 6th century BCE. "We know that the site was sealed toward the end of the 5th century BCE," George, et al. continue. "It appears to have been a single event. Of great significance...