Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $31,010
Woo hoo!! And the first 35% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Science (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Nest officially answers patent lawsuit: 'Honeywell is worse than a troll'

    04/13/2012 12:08:16 PM PDT · by dickmc · 6 replies
    The Verge ^ | April 12, 2012 | Nilay Patel
    Upstart smart thermostat maker Nest has received almost-universally glowing praise for its Learning Thermostat since it launched last year — and it also received a major patent complaint from Honeywell, which claims Nest is walking all over its intellectual property. Not so, says Nest: the company just filed its official answer to Honeywell's complaint today, and in addition to arguing that it isn't infringing Honeywell's patents, it also stridently argues that most of those patents are "hopelessly invalid." What's more, Nest also claims that Honeywell is misusing its patents to stifle innovation — a strategy Nest claims Honeywell has used...
  • NASA swipes back at former astronauts over climate change

    04/13/2012 8:46:41 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 35 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 12:06 AM 04/12/2012 | Alex Pappas
    NASA is swiping back at a group of nearly 50 of its former scientists and astronauts who wrote to accuse the space agency of advocating the “extreme” position that global warming is the result of man-made carbon dioxide.In a March 28 letter addressed to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, 49 former employees said the “unbridled advocacy of CO2 being the major cause of climate change is unbecoming of NASA’s history of making an objective assessment of all available scientific data prior to making decisions or public statements.” But NASA responded on Wednesday by saying they don’t “draw conclusions and issue ‘claims’...
  • NASA chief scientist Waleed Abdalati is clueless about what James Hansen is doing ...

    04/13/2012 8:37:35 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 6 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | April 12, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    UPDATE: 11:30AM 4/12/12 Predictably, Andrew Revkin from the New York Times joins in with the poo-pooing consensus saying it is “utterly unremarkable ” (yet he writes a article about it – go figure). From Revkin’s shuttered in world of living in the woods (he didn’t even know what the TV show Seinfeld was until I brought it to his attention in Climategate2), that’s probably true, but Andy, here is one of your favorite consensus buzzphrases that can be applied: it is an unprecedented letter. There’s no denying that. – Anthony ==========From the Daily Caller, in my opinion, a load of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Dust Devil of Mars

    04/12/2012 9:44:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    NASA ^ | April 13, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It was late in the northern martian spring when the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spied this local denizen. Tracking south and east (down and right) across the flat, dust-covered Amazonis Planitia the core of the whirling dust devil is about 30 meters in diameter. Lofting dust into the thin martian atmosphere, its plume reaches more than 800 meters above the surface. Not following the path of the dust devil, the plume is blown toward the east by a westerly breeze. Common in this region, dust devils occur as the surface is heated by the Sun, generating...
  • Anybody ever heard of a Fisker?

    04/12/2012 3:33:59 PM PDT · by goseminoles · 40 replies
    A friend of mine bought a car that I've never heard of. Anyone else ever heard of a Fisker Karma? Im on a phone so I have limited posting capabilities. Basically its like a Volt. It gets almost 60 mpg and does 0-60 under 6 seconds. Just curious is others have ever seen one? Thoughts? Tired of the Trayvon story.
  • 'UFO Galaxy' Spotted by Hubble Telescope (NGC 2683 is a spiral galaxy seen almost edge-on)

    04/12/2012 2:55:53 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies ^ | 4/11/12 | Staff
    The Hubble Space Telescope has found a UFO, but this one is filled with stars instead of little green men. The iconic space telescope snapped an amazing new photo of the "UFO Galaxy" — a galaxy 35 million light-years from Earth that is officially known as NGC 2683. "NGC 2683 is a spiral galaxy seen almost edge-on, giving it the shape of a classic science fiction spaceship," NASA officials wrote in a recent image description. The galaxy was originally discovered on Feb. 5, 1788 by famed astronomer William Herschel. It is located in the Lynx constellation in the northern sky....
  • Robosquirrel Fools Rattlesnake

    04/12/2012 1:32:55 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 04/11/2012 | Beth Marie Mole
    In a flash of fangs, the rattlesnake lunged, striking in less than a second. Its prey: a mechanical, remote-controlled squirrel, now with a pool venom in its head. "That was really exciting," said ecology doctoral student Bree Putman. "The snake saw it as real prey." On a high-tech reserve in the rolling, pastoral hills east of San Jose, Putman and her adviser, San Diego State ecologist Rulon Clark, are using robosquirrel to understand the relationship between the predator and prey, which it turns out is "complicated." That's where robosquirrel comes in. Clark and Putman said that decoding their conversations, one...
  • How the sinking of the Titanic sparked a century of radio improvements

    04/12/2012 10:02:53 AM PDT · by dickmc · 14 replies
    IEEE Spectrum ^ | Unstated | Alexander B. Magoun
    When the RMS Titanic scraped an iceberg on the night of 14 April 1912, its wireless operators began sending distress calls on one of the world’s most advanced radios: a 5-kilowatt rotary spark transmitter that on a clear night could send signals from the middle of the Atlantic to New York City or London. The equipment was owned by Marconi’s Wireless Telegraph Co. and operated by two of its employees, Jack Phillips and Harold Bride. What Phillips and Bride lacked, however, were international protocols for wireless communications at sea. Shipboard operators were still an unregulated novelty, and they reported to...
  • Cluster Of Large Quakes Serve As Reminder For Preparedness

    04/12/2012 7:06:59 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 76 replies
    CBS) ^ | April 12, 2012 12:58 AM
    LOS ANGELES (CBS) — Four large earthquakes struck around the Pacific Rim Wednesday with one setting a record, as the most powerful strike-slip quake ever recorded. Geologists have nicknamed the Pacific Rim the “ring of fire” because of frequent volcanic and seismic activity. The rash of earthquakes sent shock waves of concern across the globe. Two giant quakes struck in Indonesia, one measuring a magnitude of 8.6. People were seen running in fear. Closer to Southern California, two more earthquakes hit — a 6.5 in Mexico, where buildings rocked and shook, and a 5.9 off the Oregon coast. Local scientists...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Yuri's Planet [ NASA celebrates the USSR]

    04/12/2012 4:29:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | April 12, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On another April 12th, in 1961, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alexseyevich Gagarin became the first human to see planet Earth from space. Commenting on his view from orbit he reported, "The sky is very dark; the Earth is bluish. Everything is seen very clearly". To celebrate, consider this recent image from the orbiting International Space Station. A stunning view of the planet at night from an altitude of 240 miles, it was recorded on March 28. The lights of Moscow, Russia are near picture center and one of the station's solar panel arrays is on the left. Aurora and the...
  • Did the Moon Sink the Titanic?

    04/12/2012 3:50:53 AM PDT · by Lonesome in Massachussets · 21 replies
    Sky and Telescope Website ^ | April, 2012 | Donald W. Olson, Russell L. Doescher & Roger W. Sinnott
    Did the Moon Sink the Titanic? Exceptionally strong tides in early 1912 may have brought the iceberg into the doomed ship’s path. On April 10, 1912, the Titanic sailed from Southampton, England, on its maiden voyage. After picking up passengers at Cherbourg, France, and Queenstown (now Cobh), Ireland, the liner headed west across the North Atlantic to New York. But it would never get there. At 11:40 p.m. on April 14th, the Titanic struck an iceberg, and by 2:20 a.m. on April 15th the great ship had slipped beneath the waves. Although some 700 people were rescued from lifeboats, about...
  • The Right Stuff: what the NASA astronauts say about global warming

    04/11/2012 9:56:35 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 12 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | April 10, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    Given the high profile story today about the 49 NASA astronauts, engineers, and scientists who wrote a scathing letter to NASA director Charles Bolden, Jr. saying Jim Hansen and NASA GISS are exemplifying the “wrong stuff”, I thought I’d share this poster contributed by WUWT reader NickFromNYC:
  • The incredible power of clouds (and Roy Spencer’s work)

    04/11/2012 9:11:25 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 6 replies
    JoNova ^ | April 11th, 2012 | Joanne
    Joint Post by Tony Cox and Jo Nova Clouds cool the planet as it warms Clouds cover an enormous 65% of the planet and are responsible for about half of the sunlight that is reflected back out to space.[i] The effects of clouds are so strong that most of the differences between IPCC-favoured-models comes from the assumptions the models make about clouds. Cloud feedbacks are the “largest source of uncertainty”.[ii] Numerous studies show models project wildly different results for clouds, and yet few could correctly simulate clouds as recorded by satellites.[iii] One researcher described our understanding of cloud parameters as...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Geostationary Satellites Beyond the Alps [video]

    04/11/2012 3:37:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | April 11, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why don't those stars move? Stars in the sky will typically appear to rise and set as the Earth turns. Those far to the north or south will appear to circle the pole. If you look closely at the above time-lapse movie, however, there are points of light that appear stationary. These objects are not stars but human-launched robotic spacecraft that remain fixed high above the Earth's equator. Called geostationary satellites, they don't fall down because they do orbit the Earth -- they just orbit at exactly the same speed that the Earth rotates. The orbital distance where this...
  • Life on the edge: Inside the world's largest STONE forest, where tropical rain has eroded rocks...

    04/10/2012 7:41:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Daily Mail / Nat Geog ^ | Sunday, April 8, 2012 | Chris Parsons
    Inhospitable: The Grand Tsingy may look uninhabitable, but there are thought to be 11 species of lemur, 100 types of bird and 45 kinds of reptile living there Perilous: An explorer climbs among the razor-sharp peaks of the stone forest, where the eroded limestone rocks extend for 230-square miles Intrepid: Climbers Luke Padgett and John Benson scale another dangerous-looking peak in the Grand Tsingy, thought to be the world's largest stone forest Forest of life: Various forms of greenery can be spotted within the Grand Tsingy stone forest, despite the apparently inhospitable environmental conditions It's like a cave without...

    04/10/2012 6:29:25 PM PDT · by the OlLine Rebel · 22 replies
    N/A | 4/10/12 | me
    All times Eastern. "Titanic Tech" - H2 (History Channel 2) - 4/12 @9a, & @3p "Lost Worlds: Building the Titanic" - H2 (History Channel 2) - 4/12 @10a & @4p "Titanic's Tragic Sister" (mostly about Britannic) - H2 (History Channel 2) - 4/12 @1p & @7p "Hollywood Dailies (may cover various movies that focused on it) - REELZ - 4/12 @5:30p; 4/13 @2a & @3a & @ 7:30a "Titanic's Achilles Heel" - H2 (History Channel 2) - 4/12 @8p & 4/13 @12a; same - History Channel - 4/15 @11a "Titanic's Final Moments: Missing Pieces" - H2 (History Channel 2) -...
  • Italian LENR Workshop April 10-14

    04/09/2012 4:57:28 PM PDT · by Kevmo · 18 replies
    ECat Site ^ | April 9 2012 | Admin
    An LENR workshop, the 10th International Workshop on Anomalies in Hydrogen Loaded Metals, is slated to begin tomorrow, April 10th, in Siena, Italy. The conference’s schedule and participants are listed at the bottom of this article, and include Francesco Celani, Dr. Peter Hagelstein of MIT and Prof. Francesco Piantelli. Nichenergy, the company founded to market Prof. Piantelli’s device, is one of the sponsors of the conference. He is scheduled to give a presentation on the last day of the conference, Saturday, April 14th. The workshops goals are stated thusly: “High temperature gas loading is a promising technology to reliably...
  • DARPA Robotics Challenge: Here Are the Official Details

    04/10/2012 1:38:59 PM PDT · by dickmc · 5 replies
    IEEE Spectrum ^ | Tue, April 10, 2012 | Erico Guizzo & Evan Ackerman
    DARPA to the robotics community: the challenge is on. Today the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is announcing a bold new program aiming to advance robotics technology for disaster response. The DARPA Robotics Challenge is offering tens of million of dollars in funding to teams from anywhere in the world to build robots capable of performing complex mobility and manipulation tasks such as walking over rubble and operating power tools. It all will culminate with an audacious competition with robots driving trucks, breaking through walls, and attempting to perform repairs in a simulated industrial-disaster setting. The winner takes all:...
  • Climate scientists are losing the public debate on global warming

    04/10/2012 11:45:30 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | 9:00AM BST 08 Apr 2012 | Richard Gray, Science Correspondent
    Green campaigners and climate scientists are losing the public debate over global warming, one of the movement's leading proponents has admitted. Dr James Hansen, director of the Nasa Goddard Institute for Space Studies Photo: PA Dr James Hansen, director of the Nasa Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who first made warnings about climate change in the 1980s, said that public scepticism about the threat of man-made climate change has increased despite the growing scientific consensus. Speaking ahead of a public lecture in Edinburgh this week, he admitted that without public support it will be impossible to make the changes...
  • Hansen on skeptics – we are winning ( ROFL!,,,He hasn't seen the letter yet...)

    04/10/2012 11:28:33 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 16 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | April 10, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    Posted on April 10, 2012 by Anthony Watts Taken at the Energy Crossroads conference in Denmark on 12 March 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)Though, he still thinks we are all funded by some sort of “machine”. It never occurs to him that he’s fight a guerrilla war and that most skeptics are self motivated.Update: the UK telegraph has a similar story hereScientist hits climate change skepticism – EDINBURGH,Scotland,April 9 (UPI) –Environmentalists and climate scientists,facing public skepticism,are losing the debate on global warming,a U.S. scientist who first raised the issue says.James Hansen,director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies,who issued...
  • 40 Years Ago This Month: Apollo 16 (long article)

    04/10/2012 11:19:09 AM PDT · by chimera · 22 replies
    various | 4/10/2012 | chimera
    Apollo 16, the penultimate lunar landing mission, began on April 16, 1972, 40 years ago this month. The second of the “J” missions, Apollo 16, like Apollo 15 before it, carried an uprated lunar module, a SIM bay in the CM/SM, and an electric-powered lunar rover. Gemini and Apollo veteran John Young commanded this historic mission. Lunar geologists were anxious to target an Apollo mission for the lunar highlands. You can easily see them if you look at the moon when it is in a phase from waxing or waning gibbous to full. The brighter surface areas are the “highlands”...
  • Hansen and Schmidt of NASA GISS under fire: Engineers, ....... ask NASA administration......

    04/10/2012 10:45:36 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | April 10, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    Posted on April 10, 2012 by Anthony Watts An embarrasing image for NASA: James Hansen, arrested in front of the White House in Keystone pipeline protest. Image: via Wonk RoomLooks like another GISS miss, more than a few people are getting fed up with Jim Hansen and Gavin Schmidt and their shenanigans. Some prominent NASA voices speak out.Former NASA scientists, astronauts admonish agency on climate change positionFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEContact: Blanquita Cullum 703-307-9510 bqview at mac.comJoint letter to NASA Administrator blasts agency’s policy of ignoring empirical evidence HOUSTON, TX – April 10, 2012.49 former NASA scientists and astronauts sent a letter...
  • Proof that “Climate disruption” is found all the way back to pre-industrial times

    04/10/2012 10:15:01 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 4 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | April 10, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    A new paper in Quaternary Science Reviews titled: Combined dendro-documentary evidence of Central European hydroclimatic springtime extremes over the last millennium…demonstrates that there is evidence for extreme weather during both the Medieval Warming Period and the Little Ice Age, in fact it was seen as common according to the tree ring records examined. Unlike the Yamal debacle, it seems they did a much broader sampling of trees, both living and historical fir (Abies alba Mill.), and sampled across France, Switzerland, Germany, and the Czech Republic. Even better, unlike the irascible Dr. Mann, they didn’t have to truncate the tree samples...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Fox Fur, a Unicorn, and a Christmas Tree

    04/09/2012 9:11:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | April 10, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What do the following things have in common: a cone, the fur of a fox, and a Christmas tree? Answer: they all occur in the constellation of the unicorn (Monoceros). Pictured above as a star forming region cataloged as NGC 2264, the complex jumble of cosmic gas and dust is about 2,700 light-years distant and mixes reddish emission nebulae excited by energetic light from newborn stars with dark interstellar dust clouds. Where the otherwise obscuring dust clouds lie close to the hot, young stars they also reflect starlight, forming blue reflection nebulae. The above image spans about 3/4 degree...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Blue Straggler Stars in Globular Cluster M53

    04/09/2012 7:34:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | April 09, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: If our Sun were part of M53, the night sky would glow like a jewel box of bright stars. M53, also known as NGC 5024, is one of about 250 globular clusters that survive in our Galaxy. Most of the stars in M53 are older and redder than our Sun, but some enigmatic stars appear to be bluer and younger. These young stars might contradict the hypothesis that all the stars in M53 formed at nearly the same time. These unusual stars are known as blue stragglers and are unusually common in M53. After much debate, blue stragglers are...
  • XKCD - Lakes and Oceans

    04/09/2012 3:05:43 PM PDT · by CtBigPat · 12 replies
    Full Size

    04/09/2012 2:31:38 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 43 replies ^ | March 12, 2012
    China will accelerate the use of new-energy sources such as nuclear energy and put an end to blind expansion in industries such as solar energy and wind power in 2012, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao says in a government report published on March 5.China will instead develop nuclear power in 2012, actively develop hydroelectric power, tackle key problems more quickly in the exploration and development of shale gas, and increase the share of new energy and renewable energy in total energy consumption.The guidance indicates a new trend for new-energy and renewable energy development in China from 2012. Analysts believe that the...
  • Science question. What makes fire start with a flare?

    04/09/2012 2:13:42 PM PDT · by Lady Lucky · 67 replies
    04/09/2012 | self
    I've been asked one of those questions so basic that you never know 'til you're asked, that you really don't know. So I tried and all those other reasonable places and still can't answer. I figure there are enough smart people on FR to improve my chances. Question: When a fire starts, why does it flare up with a sudden burst of energy that is more intense than the subsequent flames? What's going on there? Why does it not kindle gradually, appear first feeble and then grow to its regular intensity?
  • Last 30 years shows climate feedbacks are zero (at best)

    04/09/2012 1:11:07 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 16 replies
    JoNova ^ | April 9th, 2012 | Joanne
    Let’s be as generous as we can. The IPCC say feedbacks amplify CO2′s warming by a factor of about three. Without the amplification from positive feedback there is no crisis So being nice people, let’s assume it’s warmed since 1979 and assume that it was all due to carbon dioxide. If so, that means feedbacks are …. zero. There goes that prediction of 3.3ºC. Feedbacks are the name of the game. If carbon dioxide doesn’t trigger off powerful positive feedbacks, there was and is no crisis. Even James Hansen would agree — inasmuch as he himself said that CO2 would...
  • Trace Levels Of Radiation Found In Seaweed Along Southern Calif. Coast

    04/09/2012 10:40:40 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    CBS) ^ | April 9, 2012 7:51 AM | Margaret Carrero
    LONG BEACH (CBS) — Marine life along the California coast may have trace amounts of radiation resulting from last year’s nuclear disaster in Japan. KNX 1070′s Margaret Carrero reports the findings come from a new study conducted by researchers at Long Beach State. The study published this month in the scientific journal “Environmental Science and Technology” details the discovery of low levels of radioactive isotopes in seaweed found along the southern Pacific Coast. Researchers at Long Beach State believe the radioactive forms of cesium and iodine blew across the Pacific in a series of storms that doused California shortly after...
  • 'Universal' cancer vaccine developed

    04/08/2012 2:58:22 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 57 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | April 8, 2012 | Richard Gray
    A vaccine that can train cancer patients' own bodies to seek out and destroy tumour cells has been developed by scientists. The therapy, which targets a molecule found in 90 per cent of all cancers, could provide a universal injection that allows patients' immune systems to fight off common cancers including breast and prostate cancer. Preliminary results from early clinical trials have shown the vaccine can trigger an immune response in patients and reduce levels of disease. The scientists behind the vaccine now hope to conduct larger trials in patients to prove it can be effective against a range of...
  • British sperm donor ‘fathered 600 children’

    04/08/2012 12:04:08 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 21 replies
    The Sun ^ | April 8, 2012
    A BRITISH scientist may have fathered 600 children after making donations to a fertility programme he ran with his wife. And one of his biological children has suggested the number may even be as high as ONE THOUSAND. Bertold Wiesner - who was born in Austria - ran the Barton Clinic in London which helped more than 1,500 women conceive. Barry Stevens, a film-maker from Canada, was concieved using Wiesner's donated sperm and said the number could be much higher. He said last night: "He was the one that found the donors so it's possible he didn't tell his wife...
  • Scientists Create Quantum Computer in a Diamond

    04/08/2012 11:20:22 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 38 replies
    HardOCP ^ | Saturday April 07, 2012 | Al
    Scientists at the University of Southern California have created a computer within a diamond to test quantum computing theories. This research could lead to super computer speeds, but for the present is still in the experimental stage. A gratuitous tip of the hat to The Weazmeister for the linkage. A qubit can represent a 0 and a 1 at the same time. This is thanks to the quantum property of superposition, and it’s the property that may one day make quantum computers insanely fast. Comments
  • Holy Ant Hill Batman.....

    04/08/2012 7:54:27 AM PDT · by Doogle · 37 replies ^ |
    You know those ants outside between that crack in the concrete 10 tons of cement?
  • Dig it! Volunteers can sign up to excavate at Topper site

    04/08/2012 6:08:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Times and Democrat ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Albert Goodyear (probably)
    The University of South Carolina is accepting registrations from volunteers to help excavate archaeological sites along the Savannah River April 30-June 2. The expedition will be led by archaeologist Albert Goodyear, whose discoveries at the Topper site in Allendale County have captured international media attention. Volunteers will learn excavation techniques and how to identify Clovis and pre-Clovis artifacts in several prehistoric chert quarries. This year, some volunteers may also be involved in the excavation of a nearby Paleoamerican site known as the Charles site. The cost is $488 per week ($400 is tax-deductible) and includes evening lectures and programs, lunch...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Io: Moon Over Jupiter

    04/07/2012 9:45:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | April 08, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How big is Jupiter's moon Io? The most volcanic body in the Solar System, Io (usually pronounced "EYE-oh") is 3,600 kilometers in diameter, about the size of planet Earth's single large natural satellite. Gliding past Jupiter at the turn of the millennium, the Cassini spacecraft captured this awe inspiring view of active Io with the largest gas giant as a backdrop, offering a stunning demonstration of the ruling planet's relative size. Although in the above picture Io appears to be located just in front of the swirling Jovian clouds, Io hurtles around its orbit once every 42 hours at...
  • Coral Links Ice Sheet Collapse to Ancient 'Mega Flood'

    04/07/2012 12:01:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | April 3, 2012 | U of Oxford
    Previous research could not accurately date the sea-level rise but now an Aix-Marseille University-led team, including Oxford University scientists Alex Thomas and Gideon Henderson, has confirmed that the event occurred 14,650-14,310 years ago at the same time as a period of rapid climate change known as the Břlling warming... During the Břlling warming high latitudes of the Northern hemisphere warmed as much as 15 degrees Celsius in a few tens of decades. The team has used dating evidence from Tahitian corals to constrain the sea level rise to within a period of 350 years, although the actual rise may well...
  • Mixed Martial Arts Celebrity Recruited for Ancient Roman Army

    04/07/2012 9:49:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, March 29, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    A newly translated inscription, dating back about 1,800 years, reveals that Oinoanda, a Roman city in southwest Turkey, turned to a mixed martial art champion to recruit for the Roman army and bring the new soldiers to a city named Hierapolis, located hundreds of miles to the east, in Syria. His name was Lucius Septimius Flavianus Flavillianus and he was a champion at wrestling and pankration, the latter a bloody, and at times lethal, mixed martial art where contestants would try to pound each other unconscious or into submission. Flavillianus proved to be so successful as a military recruiter that...
  • UPDATE 1-Ammonia used in many foods, not just "pink slime"

    04/07/2012 9:18:13 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 15 replies
    [snip] Compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ammonium phosphate and ammonium chloride are considered safe in small amounts. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted ammonium hydroxide status as a GRAS, or Generally Recognized as Safe, substance in 1974. Ammonium hydroxide is also an acceptable ingredient under the conditions of "good manufacturing practices" in dozens of foods, from soft drinks to soups to canned vegetables, according to the General Standards for Food Additives set forth by the Codex Alimentarius Commission, a group funded by the World Health Organization and the United Nations' Food and Agricultural Organization. A trip to the grocery...
  • Ancient Egyptian Cotton Unveils Secrets of Domesticated Crop Evolution

    04/07/2012 8:24:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Scientists studying 1,600-year-old cotton from the banks of the Nile have found what they believe is the first evidence that punctuated evolution has occurred in a major crop group within the relatively short history of plant domestication. The findings offer an insight into the dynamics of agriculture in the ancient world and could also help today's domestic crops face challenges such as climate change and water scarcity. The researchers, led by Dr Robin Allaby from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick, examined the remains of ancient cotton at Qasr Ibrim in Egypt's Upper Nile using high...
  • Empuries: The Ancient Greek Town of Spain

    04/07/2012 8:17:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    EU Greek Reporter ^ | March 29, 2012 | Stella Tsolakidou
    The most western ancient Greek colony documented in the Mediterranean is revealing its secrets through the development of a Document Centre on Greek trade and presence in Iberia, according to the creators of the Iberia Graeca centre. Empúries, formerly known by its Spanish name Ampurias, was a town on the Mediterranean coast of the Catalan comarca of Alt Empordŕ in Catalonia, Spain. It was founded in 575 BC by Greek colonists from Phocaea with the name of Emporion, meaning "market". It was later occupied by the Romans, but in the Early Middle Ages, when its exposed coastal position left it...
  • DNA analysis shakes up Neandertal theories

    04/06/2012 10:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies ^ | April 4, 2012 | Gail Glover
    Focusing on mitochondrial DNA sequences from 13 Neandertal individuals, including a new sequence from the site of Valdegoba cave in northern Spain, the research team found some surprising results. When they started looking at the DNA, a clear pattern emerged. Neandertal individuals from Western Europe that were older than 50,000 years and individuals from sites in western Asia and the Middle East showed a high degree of genetic variation, on par with what might be expected from a species that had been abundant in an area for a long period of time. In fact, the amount of genetic variation was...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Conjunction Haiku

    04/06/2012 9:35:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | April 07, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sister planet stands / together with sister stars. / Celebrate the sky.
  • Nasa scientist: climate change is a moral issue on a par with slavery

    04/06/2012 6:40:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 40 replies ^ | April 6, 2012 | Severin Carrell
    Averting the worst consequences of human-induced climate change is a "great moral issue" on a par with slavery, according to the leading Nasa climate scientist Prof Jim Hansen. He argues that storing up expensive and destructive consequences for society in future is an "injustice of one generation to others". Hansen, who will next Tuesday be awarded the prestigious Edinburgh Medal for his contribution to science, will also in his acceptance speech call for a worldwide tax on all carbon emissions. In his lecture, Hansen will argue that the challenge facing future generations from climate change is so urgent that a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Venus and the Sisters

    04/06/2012 9:46:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | April 06, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: After wandering about as far from the Sun on the sky as Venus can get, the brilliant evening star crossed paths with the Pleiades star cluster earlier this week. The beautiful conjunction was enjoyed by skygazers around the world. Taken on April 2, this celestial group photo captures the view from Portal, Arizona, USA. Also known as the Seven Sisters, even the brighter naked-eye Pleiades stars are seen to be much fainter than Venus. And while Venus and the sisters do look star-crossed, their spiky appearance is the diffraction pattern caused by multiple leaves in the aperture of the...
  • Clovis Comet Gets Second Look

    04/06/2012 9:21:52 AM PDT · by baynut · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 16, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    Scientists, it's said, behave more like lawyers than philosophers. They do not so much test their theories as prosecute their cases, seeking supportive evidence and ignoring data that do not fit—a failing known as confirmation bias. They then accuse their opponents of doing the same thing. This is what makes debates over nature and nurture, dietary fat and climate change so polarized. But just because the prosecutor is biased in favor of his case does not mean the defendant is innocent. Sometimes biased advocates are right. An example of this phenomenon is now being played out in geology over the...
  • Climategate Heads to Court

    04/06/2012 7:33:09 AM PDT · by Twotone · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | April 5, 2012 | S. Fred Singer
    As a climate scientist, I am quite familiar with the background facts that Prof Michael E. Mann (now at Penn State U) so shamelessly distorts in his new book The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines. Mann's claim to fame derives from his contentious (and now thoroughly discredited) "hockeystick" research papers (in Nature 1998 and Geophysical Research Letters 1999).
  • Perfectly Preserved Woolly Mammoth Discovered in Siberia

    04/05/2012 10:22:55 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 11 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | April 5, 2012 | Melissa Knowles
    Scientists in search of ancient tusks made a startling discovery. They uncovered the nearly perfectly preserved remains of a woolly mammoth in northern Siberia. The juvenile mammoth is believed to be more than 10,000 years old, but was only 3 to 4 years old when it died. It is unlike any other mammoth that has been unearthed before. The scientists reveal their discovery, which they named "Yuka," in a BBC documentary. Yuka has strawberry blond hair, unlike the dark hair that other mammoths have been found to have. Plus, Yuka's footpads are incredibly well preserved, but some of his bones...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Zodiacal Light Panorama

    04/05/2012 8:07:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | April 05, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sweeping from the eastern to western horizon, this 360 degree panorama follows the band of zodiacal light along the solar system's ecliptic plane. Dust scattering sunlight produces the faint zodiacal glow that spans this fundamental coordinate plane of the celestial sphere, corresponding to the apparent yearly path of the Sun through the sky and the plane of Earth's orbit. The fascinating panorama is a mosaic of images taken from dusk to dawn over the course of a single night at two different locations on Mauna Kea. The lights of Hilo, Hawaii are on the eastern (left) horizon, with the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Centaurus A

    04/05/2012 8:07:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | April 04, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's the closest active galaxy to planet Earth? That would be Centaurus A, only 11 million light-years distant. Spanning over 60,000 light-years, the peculiar elliptical galaxy is also known as NGC 5128. Forged in a collision of two otherwise normal galaxies, Centaurus A's fantastic jumble of young blue star clusters, pinkish star forming regions, and imposing dark dust lanes are seen here in remarkable detail. The colorful galaxy portrait was recorded under clear Chilean skies at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Near the galaxy's center, left over cosmic debris is steadily being consumed by a central black hole with...