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Science (General/Chat)

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  • David Evans explains the skeptics case (YouTube)( Skeptics of AGW - <anmade Global Warming)

    04/30/2012 9:24:25 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies
    JoNova ^ | April 28th, 2012 | Joanne
    Last week we finished some YouTube versions explaining the skeptical case. These grew out of the interview we did with Nick Minchin and Anna Rose for the ABC documentary I Can Change Your Mind. They are what we would have said, if we’d been editing the documentary . In the interview we were on a mission to show the evidence the ABC won’t show — and of course, true to form, the ABC did exactly that, and didn’t show it. As David often points out, the mainstream media have never shown this data anywhere in the world, ever, even though...
  • The Lens We’ll Look Through to Find a New Earth

    04/29/2012 9:48:15 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 3/28/12 | Brent Rose
    We have heard a lot about exoplanets in the past year. But for all the talk about these planets, which orbit a star other than our sun, we still haven't actually seen one. One tool could change that, giving us our first look at a distant planet that could be the next best thing to Earth. Currently, scientists detect an extra-solar planet by measuring the dimming of its star as the planet passes between it and our line of sight (this is known as the Transit Method). By observing the way the star's light shines around the planet, it's possible...
  • MtDNA tests trace all modern horses back to single ancestor 140,000 years ago

    04/29/2012 5:53:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | January 31, 2012 | Bob Yirka
    For many years archeologists and other scientists have debated the origins of the domesticated horse. Nailing down a time frame is important because many historians view the relationship between man and horse as one of the most important in the development of our species. Horses allowed early people to hunt for faster prey, to wander farther than before and to create much bigger farms due to pulling plows. Now, new evidence has come to light suggesting that all modern horses, which are believed to have been domesticated approximately 10,000 years ago, descended from one mare around 140,000 years ago. The...
  • Three-toed horses reveal the secret of the Tibetan Plateau uplift

    04/29/2012 3:17:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Tuesday, April 24, 2012 | Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    The Tibetan Plateau has gradually risen since the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate at about 55 Ma. Regardless of the debates over the rising process and elevation of the plateau, there is no doubt that the Himalayas have appeared as a mountain range since the Miocene, with the appearance of vegetation vertical zones following thereafter. Open grasslands per se have no direct relationship to elevation, because they can have different elevations in different regions of the world, having a distribution near the sea level to the extreme high plateaus. On the other hand, the southern margin of the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Dangerous Sunrise on Gliese 876d

    04/29/2012 4:55:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    NASA ^ | April 29, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On planet Gliese 876d, sunrises might be dangerous. Although nobody really knows what conditions are like on this close-in planet orbiting variable red dwarf star Gliese 876, the above artistic illustration gives one impression. With an orbit well inside Mercury and a mass several times that of Earth, Gliese 876d might rotate so slowly that dramatic differences exist between night and day. Gliese 876d is imagined above showing significant volcanism, possibly caused by gravitational tides flexing and internally heating the planet, and possibly more volatile during the day. The rising red dwarf star shows expected stellar magnetic activity which...
  • May 20 will feature 'best solar eclipse the U.S. has seen' in decade

    04/28/2012 10:49:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Daily Camera ^ | 04/26/2012 | Daniel H. Zantzinger
    The sun is the epitome of contrast: When the sun rises or sets, it's the "difference between night and day." Night is banished at daybreak and re-established soon after the sun sets. At least, that's usually the case. Every 18 months or so and always on a new moon, there is somewhere on the planet where the sun becomes totally eclipsed when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. There can be multiple, up to five, solar eclipses in a year -- though a total eclipse only recurs on any specific point on Earth every 360 or 410...
  • Bite Marks Offer Clue in Woman's Murder (Forensic Odontology)

    04/28/2012 10:11:14 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    The bite marks on 60-year-old woman who was found dead at her Papermill colony residence on March 20 could lead the police to the killer. In a new trend, the police have sought the help of a forensic odontologist (a dentist who assists in criminal investigation) to crack the case. According to a forensic odontologist, the bite marks could be that of a woman. This points towards the possibility that a woman was involved in the murder. Anita Sharma, wife of Late SK Sharma, a resident of B-2/3, Papermill Colony, was found strangulated at her home. The door of the...
  • Ancient Egyptian Mummy Suffered Rare and Painful Disease

    04/28/2012 7:44:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    Around 2,900 years ago, an ancient Egyptian man, likely in his 20s, passed away after suffering from a rare, cancerlike disease that may also have left him with a type of diabetes. When he died he was mummified, following the procedure of the time. The embalmers removed his brain (through the nose it appears), poured resin-like fluid into his head and pelvis, took out some of his organs and inserted four linen "packets" into his body. At some point the mummy was transferred to the 2,300 year-old sarcophagus of a woman named Kareset, an artifact that is now in the...
  • Smuggled Cargo Found on Ancient Roman Ship

    04/28/2012 7:12:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Following an analysis of the jars and their contents, Tusa and colleagues concluded that the 52- by 16-foot ship was sailing from North Africa when she sank some 1,700 years ago, probably while trying to enter the local river Birgi. In North Africa the vaulting tubes cost a quarter of what builders paid for them in Rome. "It was a somewhat tolerated smuggling activity, used by sailors to round their poor salaries. They bought these small tubes cheaper in Africa, hid them everywhere within the ship, and then re-sold them in Rome," Tusa said. According to Frank Sear, professor of...
  • White Killer Whale Spotted—Only One in the World?

    04/28/2012 2:24:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | April 25, 2012 | Christine Dell'Amore
    The headline-grabbing all-white adult killer whale spotted off Russia this month may well be one of a kind. But the sighting may not be the first time he's been caught on camera. Scientists were studying acoustic and social interactions among whales and dolphins off the North Pacific's Commander Islands (map) when the team noticed a six-foot-tall (nearly two-meter-tall) white dorsal fin jutting above the waves—hence the whale's new name: Iceberg. "The reaction from the team for the encounter, which happened on an ordinary day for spotting and photographing the whales, was one of surprise and elation," researcher Erich Hoyt said...
  • New Yorkers bring fish farms to urban jungle

    04/28/2012 11:16:35 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 28 replies
    AsiaOne.com ^ | Apr 28, 2012 | unknown
    NEW YORK - So you recycle, drive a small car, and try to eat organic. But what about running an eco-sustainable fish farm combined with a naturally fertilized vegetable patch in your kitchen? Christopher Toole and Anya Pozdeeva, two former New York bankers who founded the Society for Aquaponic Values and Education (SAVE), are there to help. "We call it 'beyond organic,'" Pozdeeva, 39, said. Aquaponics is a technique with ancient roots for breeding tank fish, recycling their effluent-filled water to fertilize vegetation, then allowing this naturally cleaned water to drip back into the tank below. It's a perfect, miniature...
  • Ancient hero stone with inscriptions unearthed

    04/28/2012 8:01:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    The Hindu ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Special Correspondent
    An ancient hero stone with inscriptions has been unearthed at Karattampatti near Thuraiyur, about 35 km from here. The hero stone was discovered from a field at a village during a field study taken up by a research team led by Subash Chandira Bose, advisor for the archaeological wing of the Centre for Cultural Studies, Coimbatore, following a tip-off given by Durairaj, a local resident. Mr.Bose, in a press release, said the bas-relief hero stone measuring 30 centimetres in width and 92 centimetres in height has been carved within a rectangular vertical frame with excellent craftsmanship. It depicts a warrior...
  • Israeli researcher: Mikvehs show that Galilee cave dwellers were likely kohanim

    04/28/2012 7:56:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Eli Ashkenazi
    The caves in which the purification baths were found were 'caves of refuge,' where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule. A fifth mikveh has been found in the caves on the Galilee's Cliffs of Arbel, indicating that the people who lived there under Roman rule were most likely kohanim, Jews of the priestly class, said Yinon Shivtiel, one of the researchers who found the ritual bath... The caves in which the purification baths were found were "caves of refuge," where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule, particularly during the Jewish...
  • Bones of early American disappear from underwater cave

    04/28/2012 7:49:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Frank Nowikowski
    One of the first humans to inhabit the Americas has been stolen -- and archaeologists want it back. The skeleton, which is probably at least 10,000 years old, has disappeared from a cenote, or underground water reservoir, in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In response, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) in Mexico City has placed "wanted" posters in supermarkets, bakeries and dive shops in and around the nearby town of Tulum. They are also considering legal action to recover the remains. The missing bones belong to a skeleton dubbed Young Man of Chan Hol II, discovered in 2010. The...
  • 'Junk DNA' Can Sense Viral Infection: Promising Tool in the Battle Between Pathogen and Host

    04/28/2012 3:27:49 AM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 24, 2012 | NA
    Once considered unimportant "junk DNA," scientists have learned that non-coding RNA (ncRNA) -- RNA molecules that do not translate into proteins -- play a crucial role in cellular function. Mutations in ncRNA are associated with a number of conditions, such as cancer, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Now, through the use of "deep sequencing," a technology used to sequence the genetic materials of the human genome, Dr. Noam Shomron of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine has discovered that when infected with a virus, ncRNA gives off biological signals that indicate the presence of an infectious agent, known as a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    04/28/2012 6:43:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | April 28, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Last Sunday's bright fireball meteor falling through skies over California and Nevada produced sonic booms over a broad area around 7:21 am. Estimates indicate the meteor was about the size of a minivan. Astronomer Peter Jenniskens subsequently recovered these fragments of a crushed 4 gram meteorite, the second find from this meteor fall, in the parking lot of the Henningsen-Lotus state park, not far from Sutter's Mill. This is now known as the Sutter's Mill Meteorite, the location famous for its association with the California Gold Rush. The meteorite may well be astronomer's gold too, thought to be a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Jupiter and the Moons of Earth

    04/28/2012 6:34:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | April 27, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Planet Earth has many moons. Its largest artifical moon, the International Space Station, streaks through this lovely skyview with clouds in silhouette against the fading light of a sunset. Captured from Stuttgart, Germany last Sunday, the frame also includes Earth's largest natural satellite 1.5 days after its New Moon phase. Just below and left of the young crescent is Jupiter, another bright celestial beacon hovering near the western horizon in early evening skies. Only briefly, as seen from the photographer's location, Jupiter and these moons of Earth formed the remarkably close triple conjunction. Of course, Jupiter has many moons...
  • Ancient Temple Discovered in Messinia

    04/28/2012 4:54:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | April 24, 2012 | Areti Kotseli
    Archaeological research reveals an ancient temple in the mountains between Ilia and Messinia, opposite the well-known imposing temple of Epicurean Apollo. The area around the newly discovered temple was full of architectural tools that were used to build a small temple, while former head of the 38th Ephorate of Antiquities, archaeologist Dr. Xeni Arapogianni explains that when the small temple was demolished in order to build a new one, topmasts, triglyphs and other parts of the ancient temple were found. The excavation started back in 2010, revealing the temple as well as bronze items and a great number of...
  • Debunking fracking myths(hydraulic fracturing for oil & natural gas)

    04/28/2012 4:47:17 AM PDT · by Las Vegas Dave · 7 replies
    eetweb.com ^ | Apr 09, 2012 | Robert W. Chase
    Fracking, a slang term for hydraulic fracturing, is a mining procedure that fractures rocks by injecting fluids and sand into cracks to force them apart, making it easier to extract oil and natural gas. Some say it can pollute drinking water and farm lands and even lead to earthquakes. But Robert W. Chase, professor and chairman of the Dept. of Petroleum Engineering and Geology at Marietta College (Ohio), believes otherwise. In fact, he took the time to shed some light on recent myths about fracking that have sprung up. Myth No. 1: Fracking could contaminate aquifers that supply drinking water....
  • Impossible Plant-Animal Hybrid

    04/27/2012 6:39:13 PM PDT · by Windflier · 33 replies
    Dark Roasted Blend ^ | April 24, 2012 | Avi Abrams
    Wildly bizarre half-plant/half-animal creature - with a lovely name "Eastern Emerald Elysia" This beautiful leaf-shaped sea slug Elysia chlorotica lives in shallow pools along Atlantic coast of North America, eats algae with gusto - one meal is enough for its lifetime! - and by using photosynthesis like any other plant, shatters the most basic definition between the "animal" and "plant" kingdoms. It may not be "easy being green", but for this slug it turned out to be highly efficient! This is the ONLY natural example of genes shared between the living kingdoms of "plants" and "animals" Shaped like a leaf?...