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Science (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • David Evans explains the skeptics case (YouTube)( Skeptics of AGW - <anmade Global Warming)

    04/30/2012 9:24:25 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies
    JoNova ^ | April 28th, 2012 | Joanne
    Last week we finished some YouTube versions explaining the skeptical case. These grew out of the interview we did with Nick Minchin and Anna Rose for the ABC documentary I Can Change Your Mind. They are what we would have said, if we’d been editing the documentary . In the interview we were on a mission to show the evidence the ABC won’t show — and of course, true to form, the ABC did exactly that, and didn’t show it. As David often points out, the mainstream media have never shown this data anywhere in the world, ever, even though...
  • The Lens We’ll Look Through to Find a New Earth

    04/29/2012 9:48:15 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 3/28/12 | Brent Rose
    We have heard a lot about exoplanets in the past year. But for all the talk about these planets, which orbit a star other than our sun, we still haven't actually seen one. One tool could change that, giving us our first look at a distant planet that could be the next best thing to Earth. Currently, scientists detect an extra-solar planet by measuring the dimming of its star as the planet passes between it and our line of sight (this is known as the Transit Method). By observing the way the star's light shines around the planet, it's possible...
  • MtDNA tests trace all modern horses back to single ancestor 140,000 years ago

    04/29/2012 5:53:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | January 31, 2012 | Bob Yirka
    For many years archeologists and other scientists have debated the origins of the domesticated horse. Nailing down a time frame is important because many historians view the relationship between man and horse as one of the most important in the development of our species. Horses allowed early people to hunt for faster prey, to wander farther than before and to create much bigger farms due to pulling plows. Now, new evidence has come to light suggesting that all modern horses, which are believed to have been domesticated approximately 10,000 years ago, descended from one mare around 140,000 years ago. The...
  • Three-toed horses reveal the secret of the Tibetan Plateau uplift

    04/29/2012 3:17:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Tuesday, April 24, 2012 | Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    The Tibetan Plateau has gradually risen since the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate at about 55 Ma. Regardless of the debates over the rising process and elevation of the plateau, there is no doubt that the Himalayas have appeared as a mountain range since the Miocene, with the appearance of vegetation vertical zones following thereafter. Open grasslands per se have no direct relationship to elevation, because they can have different elevations in different regions of the world, having a distribution near the sea level to the extreme high plateaus. On the other hand, the southern margin of the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Dangerous Sunrise on Gliese 876d

    04/29/2012 4:55:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    NASA ^ | April 29, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On planet Gliese 876d, sunrises might be dangerous. Although nobody really knows what conditions are like on this close-in planet orbiting variable red dwarf star Gliese 876, the above artistic illustration gives one impression. With an orbit well inside Mercury and a mass several times that of Earth, Gliese 876d might rotate so slowly that dramatic differences exist between night and day. Gliese 876d is imagined above showing significant volcanism, possibly caused by gravitational tides flexing and internally heating the planet, and possibly more volatile during the day. The rising red dwarf star shows expected stellar magnetic activity which...
  • May 20 will feature 'best solar eclipse the U.S. has seen' in decade

    04/28/2012 10:49:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Daily Camera ^ | 04/26/2012 | Daniel H. Zantzinger
    The sun is the epitome of contrast: When the sun rises or sets, it's the "difference between night and day." Night is banished at daybreak and re-established soon after the sun sets. At least, that's usually the case. Every 18 months or so and always on a new moon, there is somewhere on the planet where the sun becomes totally eclipsed when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. There can be multiple, up to five, solar eclipses in a year -- though a total eclipse only recurs on any specific point on Earth every 360 or 410...
  • Bite Marks Offer Clue in Woman's Murder (Forensic Odontology)

    04/28/2012 10:11:14 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    The bite marks on 60-year-old woman who was found dead at her Papermill colony residence on March 20 could lead the police to the killer. In a new trend, the police have sought the help of a forensic odontologist (a dentist who assists in criminal investigation) to crack the case. According to a forensic odontologist, the bite marks could be that of a woman. This points towards the possibility that a woman was involved in the murder. Anita Sharma, wife of Late SK Sharma, a resident of B-2/3, Papermill Colony, was found strangulated at her home. The door of the...
  • Ancient Egyptian Mummy Suffered Rare and Painful Disease

    04/28/2012 7:44:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    Around 2,900 years ago, an ancient Egyptian man, likely in his 20s, passed away after suffering from a rare, cancerlike disease that may also have left him with a type of diabetes. When he died he was mummified, following the procedure of the time. The embalmers removed his brain (through the nose it appears), poured resin-like fluid into his head and pelvis, took out some of his organs and inserted four linen "packets" into his body. At some point the mummy was transferred to the 2,300 year-old sarcophagus of a woman named Kareset, an artifact that is now in the...
  • Smuggled Cargo Found on Ancient Roman Ship

    04/28/2012 7:12:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Following an analysis of the jars and their contents, Tusa and colleagues concluded that the 52- by 16-foot ship was sailing from North Africa when she sank some 1,700 years ago, probably while trying to enter the local river Birgi. In North Africa the vaulting tubes cost a quarter of what builders paid for them in Rome. "It was a somewhat tolerated smuggling activity, used by sailors to round their poor salaries. They bought these small tubes cheaper in Africa, hid them everywhere within the ship, and then re-sold them in Rome," Tusa said. According to Frank Sear, professor of...
  • White Killer Whale Spotted—Only One in the World?

    04/28/2012 2:24:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | April 25, 2012 | Christine Dell'Amore
    The headline-grabbing all-white adult killer whale spotted off Russia this month may well be one of a kind. But the sighting may not be the first time he's been caught on camera. Scientists were studying acoustic and social interactions among whales and dolphins off the North Pacific's Commander Islands (map) when the team noticed a six-foot-tall (nearly two-meter-tall) white dorsal fin jutting above the waves—hence the whale's new name: Iceberg. "The reaction from the team for the encounter, which happened on an ordinary day for spotting and photographing the whales, was one of surprise and elation," researcher Erich Hoyt said...
  • New Yorkers bring fish farms to urban jungle

    04/28/2012 11:16:35 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 28 replies
    AsiaOne.com ^ | Apr 28, 2012 | unknown
    NEW YORK - So you recycle, drive a small car, and try to eat organic. But what about running an eco-sustainable fish farm combined with a naturally fertilized vegetable patch in your kitchen? Christopher Toole and Anya Pozdeeva, two former New York bankers who founded the Society for Aquaponic Values and Education (SAVE), are there to help. "We call it 'beyond organic,'" Pozdeeva, 39, said. Aquaponics is a technique with ancient roots for breeding tank fish, recycling their effluent-filled water to fertilize vegetation, then allowing this naturally cleaned water to drip back into the tank below. It's a perfect, miniature...
  • Ancient hero stone with inscriptions unearthed

    04/28/2012 8:01:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    The Hindu ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Special Correspondent
    An ancient hero stone with inscriptions has been unearthed at Karattampatti near Thuraiyur, about 35 km from here. The hero stone was discovered from a field at a village during a field study taken up by a research team led by Subash Chandira Bose, advisor for the archaeological wing of the Centre for Cultural Studies, Coimbatore, following a tip-off given by Durairaj, a local resident. Mr.Bose, in a press release, said the bas-relief hero stone measuring 30 centimetres in width and 92 centimetres in height has been carved within a rectangular vertical frame with excellent craftsmanship. It depicts a warrior...
  • Israeli researcher: Mikvehs show that Galilee cave dwellers were likely kohanim

    04/28/2012 7:56:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Eli Ashkenazi
    The caves in which the purification baths were found were 'caves of refuge,' where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule. A fifth mikveh has been found in the caves on the Galilee's Cliffs of Arbel, indicating that the people who lived there under Roman rule were most likely kohanim, Jews of the priestly class, said Yinon Shivtiel, one of the researchers who found the ritual bath... The caves in which the purification baths were found were "caves of refuge," where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule, particularly during the Jewish...
  • Bones of early American disappear from underwater cave

    04/28/2012 7:49:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Frank Nowikowski
    One of the first humans to inhabit the Americas has been stolen -- and archaeologists want it back. The skeleton, which is probably at least 10,000 years old, has disappeared from a cenote, or underground water reservoir, in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In response, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) in Mexico City has placed "wanted" posters in supermarkets, bakeries and dive shops in and around the nearby town of Tulum. They are also considering legal action to recover the remains. The missing bones belong to a skeleton dubbed Young Man of Chan Hol II, discovered in 2010. The...
  • 'Junk DNA' Can Sense Viral Infection: Promising Tool in the Battle Between Pathogen and Host

    04/28/2012 3:27:49 AM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 24, 2012 | NA
    Once considered unimportant "junk DNA," scientists have learned that non-coding RNA (ncRNA) -- RNA molecules that do not translate into proteins -- play a crucial role in cellular function. Mutations in ncRNA are associated with a number of conditions, such as cancer, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. Now, through the use of "deep sequencing," a technology used to sequence the genetic materials of the human genome, Dr. Noam Shomron of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine has discovered that when infected with a virus, ncRNA gives off biological signals that indicate the presence of an infectious agent, known as a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    04/28/2012 6:43:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | April 28, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Last Sunday's bright fireball meteor falling through skies over California and Nevada produced sonic booms over a broad area around 7:21 am. Estimates indicate the meteor was about the size of a minivan. Astronomer Peter Jenniskens subsequently recovered these fragments of a crushed 4 gram meteorite, the second find from this meteor fall, in the parking lot of the Henningsen-Lotus state park, not far from Sutter's Mill. This is now known as the Sutter's Mill Meteorite, the location famous for its association with the California Gold Rush. The meteorite may well be astronomer's gold too, thought to be a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Jupiter and the Moons of Earth

    04/28/2012 6:34:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | April 27, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Planet Earth has many moons. Its largest artifical moon, the International Space Station, streaks through this lovely skyview with clouds in silhouette against the fading light of a sunset. Captured from Stuttgart, Germany last Sunday, the frame also includes Earth's largest natural satellite 1.5 days after its New Moon phase. Just below and left of the young crescent is Jupiter, another bright celestial beacon hovering near the western horizon in early evening skies. Only briefly, as seen from the photographer's location, Jupiter and these moons of Earth formed the remarkably close triple conjunction. Of course, Jupiter has many moons...
  • Ancient Temple Discovered in Messinia

    04/28/2012 4:54:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | April 24, 2012 | Areti Kotseli
    Archaeological research reveals an ancient temple in the mountains between Ilia and Messinia, opposite the well-known imposing temple of Epicurean Apollo. The area around the newly discovered temple was full of architectural tools that were used to build a small temple, while former head of the 38th Ephorate of Antiquities, archaeologist Dr. Xeni Arapogianni explains that when the small temple was demolished in order to build a new one, topmasts, triglyphs and other parts of the ancient temple were found. The excavation started back in 2010, revealing the temple as well as bronze items and a great number of...
  • Debunking fracking myths(hydraulic fracturing for oil & natural gas)

    04/28/2012 4:47:17 AM PDT · by Las Vegas Dave · 7 replies
    eetweb.com ^ | Apr 09, 2012 | Robert W. Chase
    Fracking, a slang term for hydraulic fracturing, is a mining procedure that fractures rocks by injecting fluids and sand into cracks to force them apart, making it easier to extract oil and natural gas. Some say it can pollute drinking water and farm lands and even lead to earthquakes. But Robert W. Chase, professor and chairman of the Dept. of Petroleum Engineering and Geology at Marietta College (Ohio), believes otherwise. In fact, he took the time to shed some light on recent myths about fracking that have sprung up. Myth No. 1: Fracking could contaminate aquifers that supply drinking water....
  • Impossible Plant-Animal Hybrid

    04/27/2012 6:39:13 PM PDT · by Windflier · 33 replies
    Dark Roasted Blend ^ | April 24, 2012 | Avi Abrams
    Wildly bizarre half-plant/half-animal creature - with a lovely name "Eastern Emerald Elysia" This beautiful leaf-shaped sea slug Elysia chlorotica lives in shallow pools along Atlantic coast of North America, eats algae with gusto - one meal is enough for its lifetime! - and by using photosynthesis like any other plant, shatters the most basic definition between the "animal" and "plant" kingdoms. It may not be "easy being green", but for this slug it turned out to be highly efficient! This is the ONLY natural example of genes shared between the living kingdoms of "plants" and "animals" Shaped like a leaf?...
  • Dark Matter May Collide With Atoms Inside You More Often Than Thought

    04/27/2012 4:12:19 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 37 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 4/27/12 | Charles Q. Choi
    Invisible dark matter particles may regularly pass through our bodies, and dozens to thousands of these particles may be colliding with atoms inside us every year, according to a new calculation. However, radiation from these impacts is unlikely to cause cancer, investigators added. Dark matter is one of the greatest scientific mysteries of our time — an invisible substance thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. Scientists think it might be composed of things called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, that interact normally with gravity but very weakly with all the other known forces of...
  • Top 5 Figures Influencing Renewable Energy in the U.S.

    04/27/2012 10:18:20 AM PDT · by bananaman22
    Oilprice.com ^ | 04/26/2012 | Jen Alic
    As Oilprice.com embarks on its Top 5 series, we thought it expedient to begin with our take on the key figures shaping and influencing U.S. renewable energy efforts, not least because the issue of energy security is being prioritized in campaigning ahead of U.S. presidential elections. In considering from the numerous choices for these top five slots, we take into account a number of variables, including investment in renewable energy, the ability to influence policy and shape public opinion, and advocacy efforts. This goes well beyond simply counting coin – it is about innovation, imagination, vision, risk and patience. Arguably,...
  • Drats! Down the warmhole the warming went (From Harvard people...?? what ???)

    04/27/2012 9:34:59 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 25 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | April 26, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    Posted on April 26, 2012 by Anthony Watts From the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences“Warming hole” delayed climate change over eastern United StatesApril 26, 201250-year model suggests regional pollution obscured a global trend CONTACT: Caroline Perry, (617) 496-1351 Cambridge, Mass. – April 26, 2012 – Climate scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have discovered that particulate pollution in the late 20th century created a “warming hole” over the eastern United States—that is, a cold patch where the effects of global warming were temporarily obscured.While greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane warm the...
  • Mathematics of Eternity Prove The Universe Must Have Had A Beginning

    04/26/2012 3:13:30 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 74 replies
    Cosmologists use the mathematical properties of eternity to show that although universe may last forever, it must have had a beginning kfc 04/24/2012 38 Comments The Big Bang has become part of popular culture since the phrase was coined by the maverick physicist Fred Hoyle in the 1940s. That's hardly surprising for an event that represents the ultimate birth of everything.However, Hoyle much preferred a different model of the cosmos: a steady state universe with no beginning or end, that stretches infinitely into the past and the future. That idea never really took off.In recent years, however, cosmologists have begun...
  • Kids Think We're Better Off Dead

    04/26/2012 12:18:55 PM PDT · by To-Whose-Benefit? · 32 replies
    WorldNetDaily ^ | April 25, 2012 | WND
    "A 12-year-old girl has responded with the stunning “I wish we didn’t exist” to questions about how she feels about pollution and humanity’s impact on the earth, according to a new video released by Brian Sussman, author of “Eco-Tyranny: How the Left’s Green Agenda will Dismantle America.” The response came from a 6th-grade girl identified only as Kalie, from Gault Elementary. Sussman met her during Earth Day events in Santa Cruz, Calif., recently, where he traveled to ask “What is the most serious threat facing mankind?”"
  • Backdoor in mission-critical systems (Grid,etc controllers)

    04/26/2012 11:19:35 AM PDT · by dickmc · 5 replies
    Risks Digest ^ | April 25, 2012 | C Y Cripps
    Article regarding alarming major Ruggedcom (Siemens) controller BACKDOOR vulnerability. These controllers are used widely in the electric grid, military, and transportation systems!
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Morning, Moon, and Mercury

    04/26/2012 3:59:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | April 26, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Last week Mercury wandered far to the west of the Sun. As the solar system's innermost planet neared its greatest elongation or greatest angle from the Sun (for this apparition about 27 degrees) it was joined by an old crescent Moon. The conjunction was an engaging sight for early morning risers in the southern hemisphere. There the pair rose together in predawn skies, climbing high above the horizon along a steeply inclined ecliptic plane. This well composed sequence captures the rising Moon and Mercury above the city lights of Brisbane in Queensland, Australia. A stack of digital images, it...
  • Parasite of the Day -- Paragordius obamai

    04/25/2012 5:42:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Parasite of the Day ^ | April 19, 2012 | Susan Perkins
    Sex is one of the great mysteries of evolutionary biology -- why do organisms have it? It has numerous costs associated with it, including the two big ones, which are that only half the population will produce offspring in the next generation (technically really a problem more of anisogamy than sex, per se) and that successful gene combinations can be broken up via recombination. There are other costs as well. For instance, finding and wooing mates can be costly to an organism. Nematomorphs, sometimes called hairworms, are parasites that live inside arthropods as larvae, but then exist as free-living aquatic...
  • Is 'cuddle chemical' really the new Viagra?

    04/25/2012 5:28:42 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 14 replies
    “Forget Viagra, the 'cuddle drug' could be the new way to boost performance in the bedroom,” according to the Daily Mail. Apparently, inhaling the “cuddle chemical” oxytocin can cause improvements in sexual problems “on a par with Viagra”.
  • Cause of death of nearly 30K fish in Strongsville,OH section of Rocky River remains unknown

    04/25/2012 4:46:55 AM PDT · by EBH · 9 replies
    The Plain Dealer ^ | 4/24/12 | Cory Shaffer
    Wildlife and environmental officials April 23 wrapped up the field work to determine what killed 28,613 fish in a 3-mile stretch of Rocky River in the Cleveland Metroparks, including Mill Stream Run Reservation, over the past few days. Ohio Division of Wildlife spokesperson Jamey Graham said officers were collecting water and soil samples between the Bonnie Park picnic area and Wallace Lake into the night , and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is testing the samples. "We have not determined a cause," Graham said, adding that tests from the EPA could take anywhere from a few days to months to...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Meteor Over Crater Lake

    04/25/2012 4:28:19 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | April 25, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Did you see it? One of the more common questions during a meteor shower occurs because the time it takes for a meteor to flash is typically less than the time it takes for a head to turn. Possibly, though, the glory of seeing bright meteors shoot across and knowing that they were once small pebbles on another world might make it all worthwhile, even if your observing partner(s) could not share in every particular experience. Peaking over the past few days, a dark moonless sky allowed the Lyrids meteor shower to exhibit as many as 30 visible meteors...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Rosetta Approaches Asteroid Lutetia

    04/24/2012 8:25:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | April 24, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it look like to approach an asteroid in a spaceship? In 2010, ESA's robotic Rosetta spacecraft zipped past the asteroid 21 Lutetia taking data and snapping images in an effort to better determine the history of the asteroid and the origin of its unusual colors. Recently, many images from a camera always facing the asteroid were compiled into the above video. Although of unknown composition, Lutetia is not massive enough for gravity to pull it into a sphere. The 100-kilometer across Lutetian was at that time the largest asteroid or comet nucleus that had been visited by...
  • Mad Cow Disease Found in US Cow

    04/24/2012 4:53:35 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    ABC News ^ | April 24, 2012 | Carrie Gann and Dan Childs
    The Department of Agriculture today confirmed a case of mad cow disease found in a dairy cow in central California. In a press briefing today, John Clifford, the USDA's chief veterinary officer, said the cow's meat did not enter the food supply and the carcass will be destroyed. The animal was found at a rendering facility run by Baker Commodities in Hanford, Calif. The disease was discovered when the company selected the cow for random sampling, Baker Commodities executive vice president Dennis Luckey told The Associated Press. The Agriculture Department confirmed today that the cow is the fourth discovered in...
  • Are We Sliding Backward on Teaching Evolution?

    04/24/2012 4:21:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    TIME ^ | 04/24/2012 | Adam Cohen
    Tennessee was the center of the national debate when it prosecuted John Thomas Scopes for the crime of teaching evolution. Now, 87 years after the Scopes “monkey trial,” Tennessee is once again a battleground over the origins of man. This month, it enacted a controversial new law — dubbed the “monkey bill” — giving schoolteachers broad new rights to question the validity of evolution and to teach students creationism. The Tennessee legislature has been on a determined campaign to impose an ideological agenda on the state’s schools. Last week, the house education committee passed the so-called “Don’t say gay” bill,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Evaporating Blobs of the Carina Nebula

    04/23/2012 8:40:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | April 23, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: No, they are not alive -- but they are dying. The unusual blobs found in the Carina nebula, some of which are seen floating on the upper right, might best be described as evaporating. Energetic light and winds from nearby stars are breaking apart the dark dust grains that make the iconic forms opaque. Ironically the blobs, otherwise known as dark molecular clouds, frequently create in their midst the very stars that later destroy them. The floating space mountains pictured above by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope span a few light months. The Great Nebula in Carina itself spans...
  • Is 'Tuna Scrape' the Next Pink Slime?

    04/22/2012 10:03:25 PM PDT · by Daffynition · 31 replies
    (Newser) – First came "pink slime," the processed beef too dubious even for McDonald's. Now "tuna scrape" might be poised to become the seafood equivalent. With a recent salmonella outbreak being linked to tuna scrape—ground backmeat scraped from the bones of the fish—people are asking whether this fish product is fit for human consumption, reports NPR. Raw meat, after all, is generally riskier than cooked, and ground products are at greater risk for contamination. "I don't think enough research has been done on these products," one food safety expert says. But others say the comparison is unfair. While tuna scrape...
  • In a bronze inscription, a remnant of Roman might

    04/22/2012 8:41:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | Saturday, April 21, 2012 | Matti Friedman
    We do not know the name of the Roman war veteran who owned this bronze certificate, which marked his discharge from active service 1,922 years ago. His name was engraved on the tablet when it was issued in Rome, but that part is missing. We do know that he was discharged in 90 CE and that he served in one of the empire's combat units stationed in the unruly province of Judea. Because a Roman soldier served 25 years before being released, we can deduce that this anonymous fighter was in active service as a younger man during one of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Flowing Barchan Sand Dunes on Mars

    04/22/2012 8:17:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | April 22, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: When does Mars act like a liquid? Although liquids freeze and evaporate quickly into the thin atmosphere of Mars, persistent winds may make large sand dunes appear to flow and even drip like a liquid. Visible on the above image right are two flat top mesas in southern Mars when the season was changing from Spring to Summer. A light dome topped hill is also visible on the far left of the image. As winds blow from right to left, flowing sand on and around the hills leaves picturesque streaks. The dark arc-shaped droplets of fine sand are called...
  • Arctic Ocean could be source of greenhouse gas: study

    04/22/2012 7:31:07 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | April 22, 2012
    The Arctic Ocean could be a significant contributor of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, scientists reported on Sunday. Researchers carried out five flights in 2009 and 2010 to measure atmospheric methane in latitudes as high as 82 degrees north. They found concentrations of the gas close to the ocean surface, especially in areas where sea ice had cracked or broken up. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, wonders if this is a disturbing new mechanism that could accelerate global warming. "We suggest that the surface waters of the Arctic Ocean represent a potentially important source of methane, which...
  • The Case Against Pangea

    04/22/2012 3:53:17 PM PDT · by Windflier · 84 replies
    NealAdams.com ^ | Unknown | Neal Adams
    First… it’s important to understand that this is the most profound disagreement in all of science in a century and a half… and, even so, it is the tip of the iceberg, the ramifications of this disagreement will change everything we know in science, top to bottom. To begin with basic stuff. All science knows… The earth has two crusts. One…the mostly basalt lower crust or the oceanic crust which is 2 – 4 miles deeper down than the higher upper continental crust. This lower crust, essentially covers the Earth. It … this crust is being made daily at rift...
  • Proof at last as chicken comes before egg

    04/21/2012 6:56:19 PM PDT · by Revolting cat! · 12 replies
    Herald Sun ^ | Staff writer
    A HEN produced a live chick in a freak birth at a poultry farm in central Sri Lanka, a veterinary surgeon says. The vet in charge of the town of Welimada, PR Yapa, said the egg appeared to have incubated inside the hen for 21 days and the hen died when it gave birth to the chick. "I had only heard about such aberrations, but I was able to see it for myself today," Dr Yapa told AFP. He said the free-range farm owners alerted the local veterinary authorities after the highly unusual phenomenon and he performed a post-mortem examination...
  • "Breathtaking" Mummy Coffin Covers Seized in Israel

    04/21/2012 8:39:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    LiveScience via Scientific American ^ | Tuesday, April 3, 2012 | Jeanna Bryner
    Two decorated covers of coffins that once contained mummies have been seized by Israeli authorities, authenticated and dated to thousands of years ago in ancient Egypt. Inspectors of the Unit for Prevention of Antiquities Robbery found the artifacts while checking shops in a marketplace in the Old City of Jerusalem. The inspectors confiscated the items under suspicion of being stolen property. The ancient covers are made of wood and adorned with "breathtaking decorations and paintings of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics," says the Israel Antiquities Authority. Researchers examined the covers with carbon dating -- which looks at a radioactive form of carbon...
  • How fishermen are bringing lost secrets of UK waters to land

    04/21/2012 8:35:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Saturday, March 31, 2012 | Robin McKie
    Trawlerman Dennis Hunt was crossing Colwyn Bay in his boat in 1995 when its nets snagged on the seabed. Unable to free them, Hunt contacted diver Keith Hurley, who swam 60ft down to the sea floor -- and found that the nets were caught on a rusting submarine's conning tower. Hunt and Hurley had found the Resurgam, one of Britain's first submarines, which sank in 1880. It was a key historical discovery but certainly not a first for fishermen. Every day hundreds of items, ranging from Spitfire engines to ancient stone tools, are dragged up by fishing vessels while wreck...
  • Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Phoenician Port City [ Tel Achziv ]

    04/21/2012 8:10:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Gwyn Davies et al
    The ruins of the site rest atop a sandstone hill, hugging the far northern coast of the current State of Israel near the border with Lebanon. One can see later-period standing structures that provide the backdrop for what is now a national park and beach resort. But below the surface, and beneath the ocean waves, lie the remains of an ancient harbor town that reach back in history to as long ago as Chalcolithic times (4500 -3200 BC)... Known today as Tel Achziv, its remnants have been explored and excavated before, by Moshe Prausnitz from 1963 through 1964 and, in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- 3 ATs [Auxiliary Telescopes]

    04/21/2012 7:33:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | April 21, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Despite their resemblance to R2D2, these three are not the droids you're looking for. Instead, the enclosures house 1.8 meter Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) at Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert region of Chile. The ATs are designed to be used for interferometry, a technique for achieving extremely high resolution observations, in concert with the observatory's 8 meter Very Large Telescope units. A total of four ATs are operational, each fitted with a transporter that moves the telescope along a track allowing different arrays with the large unit telescopes. To work as an interferometer, the light from each telescope is...
  • Eggs of Enigmatic Dinosaur in Patagonia Discovered

    04/21/2012 7:01:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Science News ^ | Tuesday, April 10, 2012 | Uppsala U via AlphaGalileo
    An Argentine-Swedish research team has reported a 70-million-year-old pocket of fossilized bones and unique eggs of an enigmatic birdlike dinosaur in Patagonia... The dinosaur represents the latest survivor of its kind from Gondwana, the southern landmass in the Mesozoic Era. The creature belongs to one of the most mysterious groups of dinosaurs, the Alvarezsauridae, and it is one of the largest members, 2.6 m, of the family. It was first discovered by Dr. Powell, but has now been described and named Bonapartenykus ultimus in honor of Dr. José Bonaparte who 1991 discovered the first alvarezsaurid in Patagonia... The two eggs...
  • Nearby Dark Matter Mysteriously Missing

    04/20/2012 5:27:18 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 4/18/12 | Charles Q. Choi
    A new study has found no trace of the mysterious substance known as dark matter around the sun, adding a twist to current theories, researchers say. Dark matter is one of the greatest cosmic mysteries of our time — an invisible, intangible material thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. Scientists currently think it is composed of a new type of particle, one that interacts normally with gravity but only very weakly with all the other known forces of the universe. As such, dark matter is detectable only via the gravitational pull it generates. Astronomers first...
  • “Math Education: An Inconvenient Truth” Reaches 1,000,000 Views

    04/20/2012 4:27:02 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 56 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | April 20, 2012 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    Here’s some good news. M. J. McDermott’s wonderful video about why Americans don’t know math has exceeded 1,000,000 views. This is one of the best videos about education on the web. If you haven’t viewed it, please do. Running time is about 15 minutes. In this video, McDermott explains the flaws in so-called Reform Math, which was introduced to the country around 1985. Reform Math actually consists of more than a dozen separate but basically identical curricula. As fast as a community figures out that one of these things is bad, the so-called experts introduce another. These experts are diabolically...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M57: The Ring Nebula

    04/20/2012 4:24:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    NASA ^ | April 20, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Except for the rings of Saturn, the Ring Nebula (M57) is probably the most famous celestial band. Its classic appearance is understood to be due to perspective - our view from planet Earth looks down the center of a roughly barrel-shaped cloud of glowing gas. But expansive looping structures are seen to extend far beyond the Ring Nebula's familiar central regions in this intriguing composite of ground based and Hubble Space Telescope images with narrowband image data from Subaru. Of course, in this well-studied example of a planetary nebula, the glowing material does not come from planets. Instead, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Discovery Departs

    04/20/2012 4:23:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | April 19, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Climbing into cloudy skies, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (OV-103) took off from Kennedy Space Center Tuesday at 7 am local time. This time, its final departure from KSC, it rode atop a modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. Following a farewell flyover of the Space Coast, Goddard Space Flight Center, and Washington DC, Discovery headed for Dulles International Airport in Virginia, destined to reside at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Udvar-Hazy Center. Discovery retires as NASA's most traveled shuttle orbiter, covering more than 148 million miles in 39 missions that included the delivery of the Hubble...