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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Biologists induce flatworms to grow heads and brains of other species

    11/24/2015 12:49:31 PM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 24, 2015 | Provided by: Tufts University
    Tufts biologists induced one species of flatworm -- G. dorotocephala, top left -- to grow heads and brains characteristic of other species of flatworm, top row, without altering genomic sequence. Examples of the outcomes can be seen in the bottom row of the image. Credit: Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology, School of Arts and Sciences, Tufts University. ============================================================================================================ Biologists at Tufts University have succeeded in inducing one species of flatworm to grow heads and brains characteristic of another species of flatworm without altering genomic sequence. The work reveals physiological circuits as a new kind of epigenetics - information existing...
  • MEPs snub regulation of cow methane [European Union]

    11/24/2015 5:55:55 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 3 replies
    EU Observer ^ | 23 Nov 2015, 09:27 | Peter Teffer
    It was perhaps not Eric Andrieu's most stately speech in the European Parliament. But when the center-left French MEP tabled a last-minute change to new air pollution rules, he did manage to elicit laughter and applause from several of his colleagues. "At the risk of disappointing you, mister president, the European Parliament does not yet have the power to stop cows from farting or burping," said Andrieu, in Wednesday 28 October's plenary session. The vice-chair of the EP's agriculture committee heard many of his fellow MEPs laugh, and smiled. [...] After Andrieu made his fart joke, MEPs passed his amendment,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurora over Clouds

    11/23/2015 9:57:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | November 24, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Auroras usually occur high above the clouds. The auroral glow is created when fast-moving particles ejected from the Sun impact the Earth's magnetosphere, from which charged particles spiral along the Earth's magnetic field to strike atoms and molecules high in the Earth's atmosphere. An oxygen atom, for example, will glow in the green light commonly emitted by an aurora after being energized by such a collision. The lowest part of an aurora will typically occur at 100 kilometers up, while most clouds usually exist only below about 10 kilometers. The relative heights of clouds and auroras are shown clearly...
  • Scientists Are Mapping the World's Largest Volcano

    11/23/2015 7:25:33 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 21 Nov, 2015 | Brian Clark Howard
    After 36 days of battling sharks that kept biting their equipment, scientists have returned from the remote Pacific Ocean with a new way of looking at the world’s largest—and possibly most mysterious—volcano, Tamu Massif..... Tamu Massif lies about 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) east of Japan. It is a rounded dome, or shield volcano, measuring 280 by 400 miles (450 by 650 kilometers). Its top lies more than a mile (about 2,000 meters) below the ocean surface and is 50 times larger than the biggest active volcano on Earth, Hawaii’s Mauna Loa.
  • Mars Will Become a Ringed Planet When Phobos Dies

    11/23/2015 7:09:44 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 27 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 23 Nov, 2015 | IRENE KLOTZ
    Phobos survived a giant impact early in its history, but damage from the crash left the moon weak, say Benjamin Black and Tushar Mittal, planetary scientists with University of California at Berkeley. Their study shows that in 20 million to 40 million years, Phobos will break apart, leaving a cloud of debris that will relatively quickly assembly into a ring around Mars. Initially, the ring will be as dense as Saturn's rings today, and it will last for up to 100 million years, the study shows.
  • Is Earth Growing a Hairy Dark Matter 'Beard'?

    11/23/2015 4:24:17 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Nov 23, 2015 03:48 PM ET // by | Ian O'Neill
    Gary Prezeau of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., describes the results of his theoretical model that goes some way to explain how streams of dark matter particles may interact with our planet's gravitational field. "A (dark matter) stream can be much larger than the solar system itself, and there are many different streams crisscrossing our galactic neighborhood," said Prézeau in a JPL press release. "When gravity interacts with the cold dark matter gas during galaxy formation, all particles within a stream continue traveling at the same velocity." As these streams begin to interact with a planet, according to...
  • The Cheshire Cat group of galaxies

    11/23/2015 12:45:04 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 15 replies
    EarthSky ^ | Nov 23, 2015 | Deborah Byrd
    …the mass that distorts the faraway galactic light is found surrounding the two giant 'eye' galaxies and a 'nose' galaxy. The multiple arcs of the circular 'face' arise from gravitational lensing of four different background galaxies well behind the 'eye' galaxies. Chandra also said that that its x-ray observations show that that the two eyes of the cat - and the smaller galaxies associated with them - are slamming into one another in a colossal collision between galaxies: Each 'eye' galaxy is the brightest member of its own group of galaxies and these two groups are racing toward one...
  • Tel Gezer Water System Built by Canaanites?

    11/23/2015 11:10:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | November 19, 2015 | Henry Curtis Pelgrift
    Gezer is mentioned in a well-known passage in the Hebrew Bible that states that Solomon used forced labor "to build the wall of Jerusalem, Hazor, Megiddo, [and] Gezer" (1 Kings 9:15)... at Hazor, Megiddo and Gezer... most of the structures clearly belong to the Iron Age. In contrast, the water system at Tel Gezer has now been dated by project archaeologists to a much earlier period -- the MBA -- with a date as early as 2000 B.C... Gezer is also the site of massive fortifications and other structures dating to the MBA -- in addition to the Iron Age...
  • Syphilis widespread in Central Europe even before Columbus' voyage to America

    11/23/2015 9:54:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Journal of Biological and Clinical Anthropology via Health Canal ^ | November 19, 2015 | Johanna Sophia Gaul, Karl Grossschmidt, Christian Gusenbauer and Fabian Kanz
    In 1495, a "new" disease spread throughout Europe: syphilis. Christopher Columbus was said to have brought this sexually transmitted disease back from his voyage to America. At least, that has been the accepted theory up until now. Using morphological and structural evidence, researchers from the Department of Forensic Medicine and the Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology (bone laboratory) at MedUni Vienna have now identified several cases of congenital syphilis dating back to as early as 1320 AD in skeletons from excavations at the cathedral square of St. Polten, Austria... Congenital syphilis, which is passed from a pregnant mother to...
  • New glasses promise a solution to colour blindness

    11/23/2015 4:20:47 AM PST · by Daffynition · 25 replies
    CTVNews.ca ^ | November 22, 2015 | CTVNews.ca Staff
    About 10 per cent of the population is colour blind and simply can't perceive as many colours as those with normal vision. There has never been any way to correct the condtion but now, a U.S. company claims they have created glasses that can open up a world of colour to users. But some eye experts remain skeptical. Colour blindness, or colour vision deficiency, as doctors call it, is more than just a nuisance. Most with the condition can't distinguish red from green and have trouble with aspects of everyday life. They can't become pilots, firefighters, electricians, police officers or...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A 212-Hour Exposure of Orion

    11/22/2015 11:03:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | November 23, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The constellation of Orion is much more than three stars in a row. It is a direction in space that is rich with impressive nebulas. To better appreciate this well-known swath of sky, an extremely long exposure was taken over many clear nights in 2013 and 2014. After 212 hours of camera time and an additional year of processing, the featured 1400-exposure collage spanning over 40 times the angular diameter of the Moon emerged. Of the many interesting details that have become visible, one that particularly draws the eye is Barnard's Loop, the bright red circular filament arcing down...
  • Sea Wars Trailer (U.S. Navy spoofs Star Wars Trailer)

    11/22/2015 7:51:42 PM PST · by Enlightened1 · 10 replies
    Youtube ^ | 11/18/15
    The IKE Awakens.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Phobos: Doomed Moon of Mars

    11/22/2015 6:33:53 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    NASA ^ | November 22, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This moon is doomed. Mars, the red planet named for the Roman god of war, has two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos, whose names are derived from the Greek for Fear and Panic. These martian moons may well be captured asteroids originating in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter or perhaps from even more distant reaches of the Solar System. The larger moon, Phobos, is indeed seen to be a cratered, asteroid-like object in this stunning color image from the robotic Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, recorded at a resolution of about seven meters per pixel. But Phobos orbits...
  • Why can we sense when people are looking at us?

    11/21/2015 4:16:10 PM PST · by Kid Shelleen · 28 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 11/19/2015 | Laura Moss
    If you've ever felt like someone was watching you, you may have attributed that awareness to a sense of unease or a prickling on the back of your neck. But there's nothing psychic about it; your brain was simply picking up on cues. In fact, your brain is wired to inform you that someone is looking at you even when they're not. "Far from being ESP, the perception originates from a system in the brain that's devoted to detecting where others are looking," writes social psychologist Ilan Shrira. This concept may sound confusing, but it actually makes a lot of...
  • Astronaut Scott Kelly's 'UFO' photo generates extraterrestrial buzz

    11/21/2015 12:58:19 PM PST · by Momaw Nadon · 52 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | November 21, 2015 | FoxNews.com
    The truth is out there . . . maybe. A photo tweeted by astronaut Scott Kelly is generating plenty of extraterrestrial buzz. Kelly, who recently broke the U.S. record for most days in space, tweeted the picture taken from the International Space Station Sunday.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Recycling NGC 5291

    11/21/2015 10:45:19 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | November 21, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Following an ancient galaxy-galaxy collision 200 million light-years from Earth, debris from a gas-rich galaxy, NGC 5291, was flung far into intergalactic space. NGC 5291 and the likely interloper, also known as the "Seashell" galaxy, are captured near the center of this spectacular scene. The sharp, ground-based telescopic image looks toward the galaxy cluster Abell 3574 in the southern constellation Centaurus. Stretched along the 100,000 light-year long tidal tails, are clumps resembling dwarf galaxies, but lacking old stars, apparently dominated by young stars and active star forming regions. Found to be unusually rich in elements heavier than hydrogen and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Leonids and Friends

    11/21/2015 10:43:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | November 20, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Leonid meteors rained down on planet Earth this week, the annual shower of dusty debris from the orbit of Comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. Leonids streak through this composite night skyview from a backyard observatory in southern Ontario. Recorded with camera fixed to a tripod, the individual frames capture the bright meteor activity throughout the night of November 16/17, about a day before the shower's very modest peak. The frames are registered to the fixed field of view, so the meteor trails are not all aligned to the background star field recorded that same evening when nebula-rich Orion stood above the southern...
  • New clues emerge about the earliest known Americans

    11/21/2015 10:27:26 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Vanderbilt U ^ | November 18, 2015 | Liz Entman
    The stone tools discovered by the team were similar to what Dillehay had previously found at Monte Verde. Many were simple unifacial tools -- meaning they were worked on only one side of the stone, to create a sharp edge -- though some of the younger tools and projectile points indicate bifacial technologies... The bones tended to be small fragments, broken and scorched, indicating that the animals had been cooked. They often came from very large animals, like prehistoric llamas or mastodons, as well as smaller creatures like prehistoric deer and horses. The Monte Verde site was unlikely to have...
  • Which is Fastest to 186 mph? LaFerrari vs. 918 Spyder vs. P1

    11/21/2015 8:22:31 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Yahoo Autos ^ | 20 Nov, 2015 | Boldride.com
    And so the titans convene. When it became known that Ferrari, Porsche, and McLaren each had hybrid hypercars in the works, the world had one collective question that merited investigation. Which is fastest? For that answer, take a peek below. YouTube channel TheSUPERCARDRIVER decided to solve that lofty query by running the hypercar trio—Ferrari LaFerrari, Porsche 918 Spyder, and McLaren P1—from naught to 300 kph (186 mph) on the long expanse of the UK’s Bruntingthorpe Aerodrome. In case each hypercar’s power figures escape you temporarily, here’s a refresher. The LaFerrari combines hybrid drive and a 6.3-liter V12 for 949 horsepower....
  • New detector perfect for asteroid mining, planetary research

    11/21/2015 8:16:42 AM PST · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 20, 2015 | by David Salisbury & Provided by: Vanderbilt University
    Concept of an asteroid redirect mission. Credit: NASA ==================================================================================================================================== The grizzled asteroid miner is a stock character in science fiction. Now, a couple of recent events - one legal and the other technological - have brought asteroid mining a step closer to reality. The legal step was taken when the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee passed a bill titled H.R. 2262—SPACE Act of 2015. The bill has a number of measures designed to facilitate commercial space development, including a provision that gives individuals or companies ownership of any material that they mine in outer space. According to one estimate,...
  • On Viewing 2001: The First Transhumanist Film

    11/20/2015 10:59:53 AM PST · by Mellonkronos · 27 replies
    The Atlas Society ^ | November 20, 2015 | Edward Hudgins
    [If you're into science fiction or into a lot of the new scientific breakthroughs, you'll probably find this interesting!]On Viewing 2001: The First Transhumanist FilmBy Edward Hudgins I recently saw 2001: A Space Odyssey again on the big screen. That's the best way to see this visually stunning cinematic poem, like I saw it during its premiere run in 1968. The film's star, Keir Dullea, attended that recent screening and afterward offered thoughts on director Stanley Kubrick's awe-inspiring opus. He and many others have discussed the visions offered in the film. Some have come to pass: video phone calls and...
  • 4,000 coins found in Roman treasure trove in Swiss orchard

    11/19/2015 11:59:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday 19 November 2015 | Agence France-Presse
    A trove of more than 4,000 bronze and silver coins dating back to ancient Rome, uncovered this summer in the orchard of a fruit and vegetable farmer, has been described as one of the biggest treasures of this kind found in Switzerland. The huge hoard of coins, buried about 1,700 years ago and weighing 15kg (33lb), was discovered in Ueken, in Switzerland’s northern canton of Aargau, after the farmer spotted some shimmering green coins on a molehill in his cherry orchard... On Thursday the archaeological service announced that after months of digs, 4,166 coins had been found at the site,...
  • The Most Mind-Bending Fact I Learned in Physics

    11/19/2015 10:56:52 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 64 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 11/2015 | Tom Hartsfield
    Physics is built out of philosophically fascinating ideas. Or, at least, ideas that fascinate us as physicists. We are often moved to reverentially proclaim the beauty of various concepts and theories. Sometimes this beauty makes sense to other people (we're made of star stuff) and other times it's opaque (Frobenius manifolds in psuedo-Euclidean spaces). I have my own personal favorite idea. It arises from the philosophically fantastic (but mathematically moderate) workings of Einstein's relativity theory. The theory of special relativity holds that time and space are not separate entities, each operating on its own; rather they are intimately and inextricably...
  • Galactic Monster Mystery Revealed in Ancient Universe [Galaxies that shouldn't exist!]

    11/19/2015 12:26:11 PM PST · by Red Badger · 34 replies
    Discovery.com ^ | Nov 19, 2015 07:00 AM ET | by Ian O'Neill Source: ESO
    ESO's VISTA survey telescope has spied a horde of previously hidden massive galaxies that existed when the Universe was in its infancy. By discovering and studying more of these galaxies than ever before, astronomers have for the first time found out exactly when such monster galaxies first appeared. The newly discovered massive galaxies are marked on this image of the UltraVISTA field. [RED CIRCLES] ================================================================================================================ Astronomers have detected something baffling at the furthest frontiers of our observable universe: massive galaxies -- lots of massive galaxies -- that shouldn't even exist. Depending on the wavelength you observe the universe in,...
  • Project eyes particle accelerator in a shoe box with Gordon Moore grant

    11/19/2015 10:55:11 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    computerworld.com ^ | Martyn Williams
    Particle accelerators have been an important tool for fundamental physics research for decades, but they are costly, complex and long. ... So on the face of it, shrinking this kind of machine into a shoebox appears impossible. But work done in 2013 by two independent teams, one at Stanford University and SLAC and one at the Friedrich-Alexander University in Erlangen, Germany, revealed the ability to speed up charged particles using laser light and a specially etched glass channel. The researchers built silica glass chips with tiny microscopic tunnels that had ridges along their walls. When laser light was shone onto...
  • The future of the automobile is being reshaped in California

    11/19/2015 6:51:57 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 11/19/2015 | Jerry Hirsch
    Within walking distance of Tesla Motors' Palo Alto headquarters and across the street from Hewlett-Packard, Ford Motor Co. has set up a new Silicon Valley outpost. With a team of 100 reporting to a former Apple engineer, the Detroit giant is researching how humans experience machines, running autonomous-vehicle driving simulations and testing software that examines how bicycles and cars interact. "For 100 years, automobiles have been a mechanical engineering industry," said the center's director, Dragos Maciuca, who on his morning commute drives past a nearby research center of German automotive electronics and parts supplier Bosch. "Now, there is the shift...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Centaurus A

    11/19/2015 3:42:37 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | November 19, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's the closest active galaxy to planet Earth? That would be Centaurus A, only 11 million light-years distant. Spanning over 60,000 light-years, the peculiar elliptical galaxy is also known as NGC 5128. Forged in a collision of two otherwise normal galaxies, Centaurus A's fantastic jumble of young blue star clusters, pinkish star forming regions, and imposing dark dust lanes are seen here in remarkable detail. The colorful galaxy portrait is a composite of image data from space- and ground-based telescopes large and small. Near the galaxy's center, left over cosmic debris is steadily being consumed by a central black...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Sudden Jet on Comet 67P

    11/18/2015 1:29:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | November 18, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: There she blows! A dramatic demonstration of how short-lived some comet jets can be was documented in late July by the robotic Rosetta spacecraft orbiting the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The featured animation depicts changes in the rotating comet with three illuminating stills. Although the first frame shows nothing unusual, the second frame shows a sudden strong jet shooting off the 67P's surface only 20 minutes later, while the third frame -- taken 20 minutes after that -- shows but a slight remnant of the once-active jet. As comets near the Sun, they can produce long and beautiful tails...
  • Complex grammar of the genomic language

    11/18/2015 9:52:55 AM PST · by Heartlander · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | November 9, 2015 | From Karolinska Institutet
    A new study from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet shows that the 'grammar' of the human genetic code is more complex than that of even the most intricately constructed spoken languages in the world. The findings, published in the journal Nature, explain why the human genome is so difficult to decipher -- and contribute to the further understanding of how genetic differences affect the risk of developing diseases on an individual level....The sequencing of the human genome in the year 2000 revealed how the 3 billion letters of A, C, G and T, that the human genome consists of, are ordered. However,...
  • Prehistoric tooth reveals surprising details about long-lost human 'cousins'

    11/18/2015 7:11:37 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Fox News ^ | November 17, 2015 | James Rogers
    A piece of Denisovan finger bone and another tooth discovered in the same cave, respectively, in 2010 and 2000, had been dated to between 50,000 and 70,000 years ago. "The new tooth is 50,000 years older than the others -- this is really interesting, it shows us these guys were around for a long time," Bence Viola, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto's Department of Anthropology, told FoxNews.com. The finger bone and the earlier tooth were from individuals that lived within a timespan of about 1,000 years each other, according to Viola. The anthropologist, who worked on the...
  • Bizarre sea creature washes ashore on a Gold Coast beach [Australia]

    11/18/2015 7:02:36 AM PST · by ETL · 42 replies
    GrindTV.com ^ | November 16, 2015 | David Strege
    Some say it's like something out of a science fiction movie, others say it's from another world. But the bizarre and dangerous sea creature a woman discovered washed ashore at Broadbeach along the Gold Coast of Australia is actually a blue dragon. Lucinda Fry came across the creepy, electric-blue sea slug in Queensland and captured video of the little sea creature, which Daily Mail Australia posted: [video at link] The nudibranch is not that big, measuring 1.2 inches at maturity, but it packs a punch. "I have handled them before and wasn't stung, but I would not recommend anyone pick...
  • Banned TED Talk: The Science Delusion

    11/18/2015 6:47:15 AM PST · by fella · 20 replies
    YouTube ^ | Mar 16, 2013 | Rupert Sheldrake
    Banned TED Talk: The Science Delusion
  • How Global Warming Science Ate The NASA Budget

    11/18/2015 6:39:53 AM PST · by Purdue77 · 6 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 11/17/2015 | Andrew Follett
    The Daily Caller (11/17, Follett) reports that according to Representative Lamar Smith, chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, NASA's dedication toward climate research has reduced the funding available for its planetary science and exploration efforts. In an email to the Daily Caller News Foundation, Smith stated, "The Obama administration has consistently tried to cut NASA's space exploration budgets in order to fund increases for Earth science programs," adding, "Just this year, the president proposed drastically cutting NASA's exploration systems by more than $440 million dollars while Earth Science accounts have increased by 63 percent over the...
  • Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time

    11/17/2015 6:53:19 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Science alert ^ | 11/17/15 | FIONA MACDONALD
    Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time And so it begins... FIONA MACDONALD 17 NOV 2015 For the first time, Australian engineers have demonstratedthat they can write and manipulate the quantum version of computer code on a silicon microchip. This was done by entangling two quantum bits with the highest accuracy ever recorded, and it means that we can now start to program for the super-powerful quantum computers of the future.Engineers code regular computers using traditional bits, which can be in one of two states: 1 or 0. Together, two bits...
  • Archaeologists Reveal Another Ancient, Luxurious Mosaic in Lod

    11/17/2015 4:23:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | Monday, November 16, 2015 | Hana Levi Julian
    A second impressive mosaic discovered by archaeologists with the Israel Antiquities Authority is ready to be publicly displayed this week for the first time ever. In June-November 2014 a team of IAA archaeologists directed a large excavation in the Neve Yerek neighborhood of Lod. It is an area where a breathtaking mosaic that served as the living room floor in a villa some 1,700 years ago was previously exposed. The aim of the excavation was to prepare the ground for construction of a visitor center, to which the beautiful mosaic will be returned when it completes a series of exhibitions...
  • Slow-selling ‘female Viagra’ is giving Valeant a headache

    11/17/2015 12:41:57 PM PST · by C19fan · 45 replies
    NY Post ^ | November 17, 2015 | Staff
    Sorry, Valeant. The ladies just aren’t feeling it. Addyi, the so-called “female Viagra” pill made by Valeant Pharmaceuticals’ Sprout unit, is off to a slow start, with doctors writing just 227 prescriptions in its first few weeks on the market, according to a new report. That compares to the more than half a million men who got prescriptions for Viagra in its first month on the market in 1998, Bloomberg News reported on Tuesday.
  • Peregrine Falcon vs. B2 Bomber

    11/17/2015 11:10:02 AM PST · by Talisker · 47 replies
  • Image: A supermassive black hole in action

    11/17/2015 10:55:45 AM PST · by Red Badger · 48 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 17, 2015 | Provided by: European Space Agency
    Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Baum & C. O’Dea (RIT), R. Perley & W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) =============================================================================================================== Scientists often use the combined power of multiple telescopes to reveal the secrets of the Universe – and this image is a prime example of when this technique is strikingly effective. The yellow-hued object at the centre of the frame is an elliptical galaxy known as Hercules A, seen by the Earth-orbiting NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. In normal light, an observer would only see this object floating in the inky blackness of space. However, view Hercules A with...
  • Remarkable Public Support for Criminalizing Scientific Dissent

    11/17/2015 10:46:38 AM PST · by Heartlander · 22 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | November 13, 2015 | David Klinghoffer
    Remarkable Public Support for Criminalizing Scientific Dissent David Klinghoffer November 13, 2015 3:41 AM | Permalink Following on Dr. Egnor's comments of yesterday ("Criminalizing Scientific Dissent"), I would add that support for prosecuting climate skeptics is not limited, as you might think, to a fanatical elite in the media or academia. Rasmussen Reports headlines the news about its new survey, "Little Support for Punishing Global Warming Foes." But the Power Line blog points out that the survey's own figures suggest otherwise. The question posed was this: Should the government investigate and prosecute scientists and others including major corporations who question...
  • How to eliminate pain tied to tooth decay [Grow 'new' teeth]

    11/17/2015 10:29:18 AM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | November 17, 2015 | by Zen Vuong & Provided by: University of Southern California
    A scanning electron microscope image of newly-grown enamel using amelogenin-chitosan hydrogel. Credit: Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC ==================================================================================================== Dual discoveries at USC propose a promising method to regrow nonliving hard tissue, lessening or even eliminating pain associated with tooth decay, which the National Institutes of Health calls the most prevalent chronic disease. Janet Moradian-Oldak, a professor at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, has investigated methods to regrow tooth enamel for the past two decades. The process is especially tricky because unlike bone, mature enamel cannot rejuvenate. Tooth enamel is a nonliving tissue. The a-ha moment...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Pelican Nebula in Gas, Dust, and Stars

    11/17/2015 10:28:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 17, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Pelican Nebula is slowly being transformed. IC 5070, the official designation, is divided from the larger North America Nebula by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust. The Pelican, however, receives much study because it is a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The featured picture was produced in three specific colors -- light emitted by sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen -- that can help us to better understand these interactions. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming the cold gas to hot gas, with the advancing boundary between the two, known as...
  • Terrorism, not Climate Change, Kills People

    11/17/2015 6:58:00 AM PST · by rktman
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 11/17/2015 | Cliff Kincaid
    On November 13, the same day as the terrorist attacks in Paris, USA Today ran a full-page ad from billionaire Tom Steyer’s group NextGen Climate highlighting the alleged global threat from climate change. As hundreds of people were being injured or killed in Paris, the ad featured these quotes about the “climate crisis:” Hillary Clinton: “An existential threat” Bernie Sanders: “The greatest threat facing the planet” Martin O’Malley: “Critical threat to our economy” In a new development, we have just learned from Judicial Watch that Hillary Clinton was characterized by her Muslim-connected aide, Huma Abedin, as being “very confused” about...
  • Reload .22LR Ammo ? Hint: Yes, You Can ~ VIDEO

    11/16/2015 11:39:24 PM PST · by SWAMPSNIPER · 31 replies
    ammoland ^ | 11/16/2015 | Tom McHale
    This is a review of the 22LR Reloading kits from AMG
  • Microsoft boffins build better crypto for secure medical data crunching

    11/16/2015 6:55:34 PM PST · by dayglored · 12 replies
    The Register ^ | Nov 16, 2015 | Team Register
    Practical homomorphic encryption manual released As genome research - and the genomes themselves - get passed around the scientific community, the world's woken up to the security and privacy risks this can involve. A Microsoft research quintet has therefore published ways to help scientists work on genomic data while reducing the risk of data theft. The team published an informal manual to help scientists and other researchers to use the Simple Encrypted Arithmetic Library (SEAL). Homomorphic encryption is a technique in which software can operate on encrypted data without decrypting it. This would let hospitals and labs to work on...
  • Researchers decode patterns that make our brains human

    11/16/2015 3:16:32 PM PST · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/16/2015 | Allen Institute
    The human brain may be the most complex piece of organized matter in the known universe, but Allen Institute researchers have begun to unravel the genetic code underlying its function. Research published this month in Nature Neuroscience identified a surprisingly small set of molecular patterns that dominate gene expression in the human brain and appear to be common to all individuals, providing key insights into the core of the genetic code that makes our brains distinctly human. "So much research focuses on the variations between individuals, but we turned that question on its head to ask, what makes us similar?"...
  • 'Fourth strand' of European ancestry originated with hunter-gatherers isolated by Ice Age

    11/16/2015 1:14:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Monday, November 16, 2015 | University of Cambridge, Nature
    The first sequencing of ancient genomes extracted from human remains that date back to the Late Upper Palaeolithic period over 13,000 years ago has revealed a previously unknown "fourth strand" of ancient European ancestry. This new lineage stems from populations of hunter-gatherers that split from western hunter-gatherers shortly after the 'out of Africa' expansion some 45,000 years ago and went on to settle in the Caucasus region, where southern Russia meets Georgia today. Here these hunter-gatherers largely remained for millennia, becoming increasingly isolated as the Ice Age culminated in the last 'Glacial Maximum' some 25,000 years ago, which they weathered...
  • Wailing at the wrong wall?

    11/16/2015 12:39:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, November 15, 2015 | editors
    "Josephus described it [the fortress] as being "erected upon a rock of fifty cubits in height" on a "great precipice," Sams quotes Josephus... With 60-foot walls, four towers (the southeast being 105 feet high), and smooth stones covering the slope on its east side, it dominated the temple to its south, ready to fend off the most formidable attacks." Given this description, according to Sams, tucking Fortress Antonia north of the temple location in the Temple Mount area subscribed to by most scholars would have been impossible. It simply wouldn't fit. Moreover, Sams cites the insufficiency or paucity of archaeological...
  • The ancient Greeks in Ukraine

    11/16/2015 12:17:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | November 13, 2015 | unattributed
    By using aerial photographs and geophysical surveys, Warsaw archaeologists not only confirmed the location of settlement dating back more than two thousand years in Respublikaniec (Kherson Oblast), but also discovered previously unknown structures in its area... Archaeologists determined that the settlement was probably founded in the 2nd century BC. Researchers also discovered the exact outline of its fortifications -- defensive walls and ditches. In addition to defensive functions, the place also served as a venue of trade between residents of the Dnieper steppes and the ancient world, represented by the nearby Greek colony -- Olbia. The settlement could also have...
  • Cygnus Freighter Fueled and Loaded to Resume American Cargo Launches to Space Station

    11/16/2015 12:16:51 PM PST · by BenLurkin
    universetoday.com ^ | Ken Kremer
    Blastoff of Cygnus atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket on the OA-4 resupply mission under contract to NASA is anticipated on December 3, 2015 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at approximately 5:55 pm. ET. The cylindrically shaped Cygnus, manufactured by Orbital ATK, was on display for the press inside the KSC clean room with both halves of the 14 foot (4 meter) wide Atlas rocket aluminum payload fairing, within which it will be encapsulated on Monday, Nov, 16, as technicians and engineers were actively at work conducting final close...
  • NOAA: Deaths Caused by Severe Weather Hit 22-Year Low in 2014

    11/16/2015 5:42:12 AM PST · by Enlightened1 · 11 replies
    CNS News ^ | 11/12/15 | Barbara Hollingsworth
    Severe weather caused 333 deaths in the United States in 2014, according to the National Weather Service's Summary of Natural Hazard Statistics for 2014. That was the fewest in 22 years. "Fortunately, the United States was again spared any major land falling tropical storms. There were no U.S. tropical storm related deaths in 2014," according to the report. The last time there were fewer "fatalities caused by severe weather" was in 1992, when 308 such deaths were recorded, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "For the third consecutive year, weather-related deaths dropped significantly," said the NOAA summary. NOAA...