Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $44,961
51%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 51%!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Science (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Sierra Leone buries 300 victims involved in Devastating floods

    08/18/2017 7:56:45 AM PDT · by Timex247
    Timex247 blog ^ | Timex247
    Sierra Leone buried at least 300 victims of devastating floods on Thursday, as fears grew of more mudslides and accusations of government "inaction" over deforestation and poor urban planning mounted. With the aim of clearing the overflowing central morgue, burials began around 1800 GMT in Waterloo, a nearby town where many victims of the Ebola crisis that hit the nation in 2014 were also laid to rest, according to a morgue official and an AFP journalist at the scene. President Ernest Bai Koroma was accompanied by Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, whose nation also lost thousands to Ebola, both wearing...
  • Gravitational Lensing Provides Rare Glimpse Into Interiors of Black Holes

    08/18/2017 12:16:04 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 2 replies
    Universe Today ^ | 8/17/17 | Matt Williams
    Gravitational Lensing Provides Rare Glimpse Into Interiors of Black Holes Article written: 17 Aug , 2017 by Matt Williams The observable Universe is an extremely big place, measuring an estimated 91 billion light-years in diameter. As a result, astronomers are forced to rely on powerful instruments to see faraway objects. But even these are sometimes limited, and must be paired with a technique known as gravitational lensing. This involves relying on a large distribution of matter (a galaxy or star) to magnify the light coming from a distant object.Using this technique, an international team led by researchers from the California...
  • Man Who Burned Retina During 1962 Eclipse Warns Others of Viewing Dangers

    08/17/2017 1:39:31 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    Lou Tomososki was a high school teen in 1962 when his science teacher told the class about a solar eclipse that was going to take place that afternoon, NBC affiliate KGW reported. Tomososki and a friend viewed the partial eclipse outside Marshall High School in Portland. "The sun at that time, at 3:30 p.m., was in the one o’clock position," said Tomososki. "I said to Roger, 'If you stare at it long enough the brightness goes away.'" By that night, both Tomososki and Roger were having vision problems. He said the vision problems never got any worse — but they...
  • Perfect Eclipses: Coincidence or Conspiracy?

    08/17/2017 8:04:56 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 9 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | August 17, 2017 | Jay W. Richards
    Perfect Eclipses: Coincidence or Conspiracy? Jay W. Richards | @FreemarketJay August 17, 2017 On August 21, we Americans get to see a total solar eclipse. As I mentioned in a previous piece, we can see solar eclipses only because our planet, our Moon, and our Sun sometimes come together in a straight line in space. When the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, those in the Moon’s shadow see an eclipse. But the story doesn’t end there. A rare alignment of events allows Earthlings to witness not just solar eclipses, but what we might call perfect solar eclipses. Our...
  • Total solar eclipse 2017: 6 bizarre things that will happen

    08/17/2017 7:46:43 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 52 replies
    CNet ^ | August 16, 2017 | Alina Bradford
    Total solar eclipse 2017: 6 bizarre things that will happen Things get a little weird during an eclipse. Here are six things to look for. While there are many superstitions about eclipses, there are also a lot of weird things that happen during an eclipse that are completely real -- and super cool. Here are six incredible things to look for during the eclipse on August 21.1. Animals getting confused "A totally eclipsed sun is 10,000 times fainter than one that is 99 percent covered by the moon," Meg Pickett, astrophysicist and a professor of physics at Lawrence University told...
  • How to make sure your eclipse glasses actually work

    08/17/2017 6:04:52 AM PDT · by Leaning Right · 55 replies
    Popular Science ^ | August 14, 2017 | Rachel Feltman
    You've planned your road trip, downloaded your science apps, and bought yourself a pair of shiny new spectacles: you're ready for the eclipse. But is your eyewear is up to the task? With the Great American Eclipse approaching, demand for eclipse glasses—with special lenses designed to keep the sun from harming your peepers—is surging. And counterfeit glasses are everywhere. In fact, Amazon is so swamped by reports of possibly unsafe glasses that the company is allegedly sending out recalls and refunds for products that are certified as eclipse-safe.
  • The Impact of Solar Eclipses for History

    08/16/2017 11:17:25 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 10 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | August 16, 2017 | Staff
    The Impact of Solar Eclipses for History Evolution News | @DiscoveryCSC August 16, 2017 When the sky goes dark at mid-day, people notice. Because some observers wrote down what they saw, and because the clockwork of the heavens is so precise, historians can nail down important dates for chronological research. Human responses to eclipses are interesting to think about. These cosmic events are rare enough for any spot on the earth to strike fear and wonder in the eyes of anyone unfamiliar with their causes. Joe Rao relates the story at Space.com about how Christopher Columbus, aware of an approaching...
  • Spat Over Design of New Chinese Telescope Goes Public

    08/16/2017 11:13:03 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 2 replies
    Science ^ | Aug. 11, 2017 | ongming Huang
    Spat over design of new Chinese telescope goes public By Yongming HuangAug. 11, 2017 , 12:13 PM A deep division among Chinese astronomers over the design of a proposed 12-meter telescope broke into public view this week as statements from competing camps went viral on social media. The dispute centers on whether to adopt a technically ambitious four-mirror design proposed by optical engineers or a conventional three-mirror option favored by astronomers. The stakes are high. It will be China’s largest optical telescope and serve as the workhorse observational facility for several generations. In a 4 August letter to the Chinese...
  • Yemen cholera cases exceed half a million in four months

    08/15/2017 9:44:35 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 11 replies
    m.france.24.com ^ | 8/14/17 | WHO
    More than half a million people in Yemen have been infected with cholera since the epidemic began four months ago and 1,975 people have died, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday. Each day there are more than 5,000 new cases of the waterborne disease, which causes acute diarrhoea and dehydration, in the country where the health system has collapsed after more than two years of war, it said. "The total number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen this year hit the half a million mark on Sunday, and nearly 2,000 people have died since the outbreak began to...
  • Solar Eclipses and Life

    08/15/2017 6:16:13 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 19 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | August 15, 2017 | Staff
    Solar Eclipses and Life Evolution News | @DiscoveryCSC August 15, 2017, 1:53 AM In previous posts in our solar eclipse series (here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here) we touched on safe viewing methods, the mechanics of solar eclipses, and a couple of surprising coincidences. We also explained why the solar eclipses we enjoy from earth’s surface are the best in the solar system. The solar eclipse coincidences have been noted by astronomers, but most have treated them as mere coincidences. Some scientists are troubled by them. The popular British science writer and astronomer John Gribbin comments on...
  • Experiments cast doubt on how the Earth was formed

    08/14/2017 9:04:24 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 55 replies
    <p>New geochemical research indicates that existing theories of the formation of the Earth may be mistaken. The results of experiments to show how zinc (Zn) relates to sulphur (S) under the conditions present at the time of the formation of the Earth more than 4 billion years ago, indicate that there is a substantial quantity of Zn in the Earth’s core, whereas previously there had been thought to be none. This implies that the building blocks of the Earth must be different to what has been supposed. The work is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Paris.</p>
  • Scientists discover 91 volcanoes below Antarctic ice sheet

    08/14/2017 7:22:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    www.theguardian.com ^ | 08-14-2017 | Staff
    This is in addition to 47 already known about and eruption would melt more ice in region affected by climate change. Scientists have uncovered the largest volcanic region on Earth – two kilometres below the surface of the vast ice sheet that covers west Antarctica. The project, by Edinburgh University researchers, has revealed almost 100 volcanoes – with the highest as tall as the Eiger, which stands at almost 4,000 metres in Switzerland. Geologists say this huge region is likely to dwarf that of east Africa’s volcanic ridge, currently rated the densest concentration of volcanoes in the world. And the...
  • Too Many Meds? America's Love Affair With Prescription Medication

    08/12/2017 8:00:25 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 39 replies
    Consumer Reports ^ | August 03, 2017 | Teresa Carr
    We now take more pills than ever. Is that doing more harm than good? If you’re like most Americans, you probably start your day with a hot shower, a cup of coffee—and a handful of pills. More than half of us now regularly take a prescription medication—four, on average—according to a new nationally representative Consumer Reports survey of 1,947 adults. Many in that group also take over-the-counter drugs as well as vitamins and other dietary supplements. It turns out Americans take more pills today than at any other time in recent history (see “Pill Nation: The Rise of Rx Drug...
  • Chasing the Total Solar Eclipse from NASA’s WB-57F Jets

    08/12/2017 5:46:32 PM PDT · by ETL · 30 replies
    NASA.gov ^ | July 25, 2017
    For most viewers, the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse will last less than two and half minutes. But for one team of NASA-funded scientists, the eclipse will last over seven minutes. Their secret? Following the shadow of the Moon in two retrofitted WB-57F jet planes. Amir Caspi of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, and his team will use two of NASA’s WB-57F research jets to chase the darkness across America on Aug. 21. Taking observations from twin telescopes mounted on the noses of the planes, Caspi will ­­­­­capture the clearest images of the Sun’s outer atmosphere —...
  • Upper Palaeolithic engraved human bone associated with ritualistic cannibalism UK

    08/12/2017 12:34:53 PM PDT · by Openurmind · 15 replies
    PLOS one ^ | 8/917 | PLOS one
    Abstract Cut-marked and broken human bones are a recurrent feature of Magdalenian (~17–12,000 years BP, uncalibrated dates) European sites. Human remains at Gough’s Cave (UK) have been modified as part of a Magdalenian mortuary ritual that combined the intensive processing of entire corpses to extract edible tissues and the modification of skulls to produce skull-cups. A human radius from Gough’s Cave shows evidence of cut marks, percussion damage and human tooth marks, indicative of cannibalism, as well as a set of unusual zig-zagging incisions on the lateral side of the diaphysis. These latter incisions cannot be unambiguously associated with filleting...
  • Elements & Country of Discovery

    08/12/2017 5:37:42 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    @Cmdr_Hadfield ^ | 7/31/17 | Cmdr Chris Hadfield
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2017: When, Where & How to See It

    08/12/2017 1:51:20 AM PDT · by Pontiac · 25 replies
    Space.com ^ | August 11, 2017 | Sarah Lewin
    The peak of the Perseid Meteor Shower is peaking this weekend! According to NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke, the Perseids are perhaps the most popular meteor shower of the year. Typical rates are about 80 meteors an hour, but in outburst years (such as in 2016) the rate can be between 150-200 meteors an hour. The meteor shower's actual peak is around 1 p.m. EDT Aug. 12, which means that the night before and the night after will both have good rates; Cooke said the show would be slightly better in the predawn hours of Aug. 12, but that there'd...
  • NASA looks at reviving atomic rocket program

    08/11/2017 11:40:31 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    New Atlas ^ | 8/10/17 | David Szondy
    NASA looks at reviving atomic rocket program David Szondy August 10, 2017 A new engine being developed for NASA will use low-enriched uranium Cermet fuel rods (Credit: NASA) View gallery - 4 images When the first manned mission to Mars sets out, it may be on the tail of an atomic rocket engine. The Space Race vintage technology could have a renaissance at NASA after the space agency's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama signed a contract with BWXT Nuclear Energy to develop updated Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) concepts and new fuel elements to power them. The Apollo missions to...
  • NASA’s plasma rocket making progress toward a 100-hour firing

    08/11/2017 8:18:43 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Ars Technica ^ | 10 Aug, 2017 | ERIC BERGER
    Almost everyone recognizes that if humans are truly to go deeper into the Solar System, we need faster and more efficient propulsion systems than conventional chemical rockets. Rocket engines powered by chemical propellants are great for breaking the chains of Earth's gravity, but they consume way too much fuel when used in space and don't offer optimal control of a spacecraft's thrust. NASA recognizes this, too. So in 2015, the space agency awarded three different contracts for development of advanced propulsion systems. Of these, perhaps the most intriguing is a plasma-based rocket—which runs on Argon fuel, generates a plasma, excites...
  • An Open Letter to My Colleagues (regarding life’s origin)

    08/11/2017 7:20:35 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 23 replies
    Inference Review ^ | August 2, 2017 | James Tour
    An Open Letter to My Colleagues James TourLife should not exist. This much we know from chemistry. In contrast to the ubiquity of life on earth, the lifelessness of other planets makes far better chemical sense. Synthetic chemists know what it takes to build just one molecular compound. The compound must be designed, the stereochemistry controlled. Yield optimization, purification, and characterization are needed. An elaborate supply is required to control synthesis from start to finish. None of this is easy. Few researchers from other disciplines understand how molecules are synthesized. Synthetic constraints must be taken into account when considering the...