Keyword: scotland

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • The terrifying prospect of the Scots ruling England is now all too real [truncated]

    03/06/2015 6:41:49 AM PST · by C19fan · 11 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 6, 2015 | Max Hastings
    To most of us, it seems like an eternity ago that David Cameron stood outside Downing Street the morning after the Scottish electorate rejected independence, and declared: ‘The people of Scotland have spoken. It is a clear result. Now it is time for the United Kingdom to come together and move forward.’ Today, however, six months on, the latest opinion poll suggests that the General Election in May could give Labour and the Tories equal representation in the Commons, with the Nationalists sweeping Scotland to hold 56 out of 59 seats, and the balance of power at Westminster.
  • Anger after Palestinians branded "terrorists" in Scottish primary school homework

    03/05/2015 3:29:06 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 13 replies
    Herald Scotland ^ | Wednesday 4 March 2015 | Herald Scotland
    A SCOTTISH council has come under fire after one of its schools handed out homework to primary pupils describing Palestinians as "terrorists". Parents from New Stevenston Primary School in Motherwell made the complaint after children in P7 received a homework assignment on terrorism and terror. One of the case studies pupils were asked questions on stated: "Palestinians feel they have the right to use terrorism against Israelis" and asks pupils to give two reasons for this. The homework also asks pupils to "describe two examples of Palestinian terrorist activities". In the accompanying information pupils are told that: "Palestinians have turned...
  • Three women arrested after man glassed during Valentine's Day screening of Fifty Shades

    02/17/2015 8:30:00 PM PST · by Slings and Arrows · 59 replies
    The Telegraph [UK] ^ | 16 Feb 2015
    A Valentine's Day cinema screening of Fifty Shades of Grey ended in chaos when three women were arrested for attacking a man. Witnesses claim the bust-up started after the victim asked the "worse for the wear" women to quieten down during a viewing on Saturday evening. Police then rushed to Grosvenor Cinema in Glasgow's west end where they arrested three women. Cinema visitors also claimed the man had been glassed and that staff were forced to wipe blood from seats before the next screening of the film.
  • Irish, Scots And Welsh Not Celtic - Scientist

    09/09/2004 3:59:23 PM PDT · by blam · 60 replies · 5,985+ views
    IOL ^ | 9-9-2004
    Irish, Scots and Welsh not Celts - scientists September 09 2004 at 08:15PM Dublin - Celtic nations like Ireland and Scotland have more in common with the Portuguese and Spanish than with "Celts" - the name commonly used for a group of people from ancient Alpine Europe, scientists say. "There is a received wisdom that the origin of the people of these islands lie in invasions or migrations... but the affinities don't point eastwards to a shared origin," said Daniel Bradley, co-author of a genetic study into Celtic origins. Early historians believed the Celts - thought to have come from...
  • Tories open four point lead over Labour

    02/16/2015 10:02:06 AM PST · by NRx · 20 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 16 Feb 2015 | Steven Swinford
    The Conservatives have opened up a four-point lead over Labour after the biggest surge in their support for two years, a poll has suggested. A Guardian/ ICM poll showed that the Tories are six points up to 36 per cent, only one point short of their result in the 2010 General Election. Labour support fell one point to 32 per cent, while the Liberal Democrats were also down a point to 10 per cent.
  • Nazism Was Not Christian and Galloway Is Ignorant or Lying

    02/07/2015 10:21:02 AM PST · by Enza Ferreri · 24 replies
    Enza Ferreri Blog ^ | 7 February 2015 | Enza Ferreri
    Two days ago's Question Time on BBC1 was one of the worst I've ever seen, beating its own record of mendacious and appalling programmes. The panellist George Galloway described fascism as a "Christian phenomenon", whereas it's a well-established historical fact that Nazism was neo-pagan, tried to destroy Christianity in Germany and persecuted Christian clergy and churches. The very symbol of the SS, the SS bolts or Runic "SS" (), consisted of runes, signs popular in Germanic neopaganism. Nazism wanted to replace Christianity with a "völkisch" (folkish or racial) cult, a moral doctrine derived from the pre-Christian, pagan Germanic heritage....
  • Why I believe there is a difference between Scottish muslim and the rest of the UK

    02/01/2015 5:58:19 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 27 replies
    Herald Scotland ^ | February 1, 2015 | by Imran Azam
    ... The Muslim population in the UK numbers 3.5 million. A large percentage can trace their roots back to a rural region of Pakistan controlled Kashmir and Sylhet in Bangladesh. They arrived uneducated and with a very narrow, insular strand of Islam and settled in the North of England or inner city London. In comparison the Indian community who settled in Britain were middle class and possessed a strong entrepreneurial background as well as placing a high priority on education. Many were expelled from Uganda by Idi Amin. After 50 years in the UK the Indian community continues to thrive...
  • BBC Accused of ‘Race-Baiting’ over Galloway Golders Green Invite

    01/27/2015 11:15:18 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 26 replies
    INN ^ | 1/27/2015, 7:37 PM | Ari Soffer
    The BBC has been accused of “race-baiting” for inviting radical anti-Israel MP George Galloway to appear at a high-profile show hosted in Finchley and Golders Green, which is home to one of the largest Jewish communities in the UK. “Question Time” sees commentators and political figures take part in a panel discussion on hot political topics, as well as fielding questions from members of the audience. Each episode is filmed in different locations around the country to allow different communities to take part. But the decision to invite Galloway of all people to the upcoming showing—which will be based in...
  • Minister leaves Church of Scotland over Kirk's 'unbiblical decisions'

    01/26/2015 3:38:25 PM PST · by Morgana · 12 replies
    heraldscotland.com ^ | 26 January 2015 | staff
    An Inverness minister has announced he will leave the Church of Scotland over a series of "unbiblical" decisions by the Kirk. Rev Andrew McMillan, 38, will depart Dalneigh and Bona at the end of February and plans to establish a new church in the west of Inverness with the Free Church. The former Royal Marine said the Kirk is setting itself on a "fatal course" with a series of "unbiblical" decisions, including proposals to change religious observance rules in state schools, and criticised its divided stance on assisted suicide. It is understood Rev Andrew McMillan will become the eleventh former...
  • Pupils Tune Up For Pipe Band Competition

    01/24/2015 1:25:27 PM PST · by ConorMacNessa · 13 replies
    Banffshire Journal ^ | 21 January 2015
    BANFF Academy’s pipe band will join entrants from other Aberdeenshire schools aiming to ‘give it a skirl’ at the world’s largest schools piping and drumming competition in March. The Scottish Schools Pipe Band Championships (SSPBC), dedicated to stoking up passion for Scotland’s national musical heritage, will be held in Edinburgh. Nearly 30 schools have already registered for the competition, taking place on Sunday, March 8, at Broughton High School and neighbouring Fettes College in the capital. Graham Drummond, pipe major at Banff Academy, said: "I’m very excited to be making history with Banff Academy, as this is the first time...
  • 10 reasons Edinburgh is the best place to celebrate Burns Night

    01/23/2015 9:27:25 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 22 replies
    http://Metro.co.uk ^ | Friday 23 Jan 2015 | Ali Liddy
    http://metro.co.uk/2015/01/23/10-reasons-edinburgh-is-the-best-place-to-celebrate-burns-night-5029499/
  • Recycled Whisky Waste Has £140M Potential ( ... as Fish Food)

    01/21/2015 5:42:03 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 22 replies
    The Spirits Business ^ | 20th January, 2015 | Melita Kiely
    Recycled whisky waste has £140m potential • The Scotch whisky industry could generate £140 million through recycling whisky wastes into fish feed for Scotland’s fish farming industry and help build a more circular economy. The possibility was highlighted in the Circular Economy Scotland report, which examines how the certain sectors such as oil and gas and the food industry can use their strengths to generate millions of pounds worth of value from materials used in these areas. It suggested the whisky industry could continue to capture heat and electricity from whisky wastes, but biorefining wastes could produce two more products...
  • Dog Found Abandoned With Suitcase Filled With His Belongings

    01/06/2015 3:31:21 PM PST · by smokingfrog · 54 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 1-6-15 | Meghan Keneally
    A dog was found abandoned at a Scottish train station next to a suitcase filled with it's belongings and now the local animal welfare charity are looking for tips into who is the neglectful owner. The dog, a male shar-pei named Kai, was found sitting with a leash attached to a banister at the Ayr railway station on Jan. 2, according to the Scottish Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. "Kai is around two to three years old and is a lovely dog with a nice nature," Scottish SPCA Inspector Stewart Taylor said in the group's release. The group...
  • Author Says a Whole Culture -- Not a Single 'Homer' -- Wrote 'Iliad,' 'Odyssey'

    01/05/2015 1:09:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies
    National Geographic ^ | January 4, 2015 | Simon Worrall
    In Why Homer Matters, historian and award-winning author Adam Nicolson suggests that Homer be thought of not as a person but as a tradition and that the works attributed to him go back a thousand years earlier than generally believed. Speaking from his home in England, Nicolson describes how being caught in a storm at sea inspired his passion for Homer, how the oral bards of the Scottish Hebrides may hold the key to understanding Homer's works, and why smartphones are connecting us to ancient oral traditions in new and surprising ways... About ten years ago, I set off sailing...
  • Scotland’s National Instrument in Danger of Extinction

    12/31/2014 4:42:08 PM PST · by ConorMacNessa · 55 replies
    The Economic Voice ^ | 31 December 2014 | Economic Voice Staff
    The iconic sight and sound of pipers playing Auld Lang Syne at Hogmannay Street Parties could be under threat – according to piping enthusiasts who are campaigning for more tuition in state schools. More than 75,000 people are expected to descend upon Princes Street on December 31 to attend one of the world’s biggest and most famous celebrations, Edinburgh’s Hogmanay Street Party, which will see thousands of revellers sing along to the famous song at Midnight. However, according to David Johnston, Championships Convenor for the Scottish Schools Pipe Band, the world famous tradition could become a thing of the past...
  • Brent oil hits new low as Opec price war deepens slump

    12/30/2014 9:23:26 AM PST · by C19fan · 6 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | December 30, 2014 | Andrew Critchlow,
    Brent crude plunged below $57 per barrel briefly on Tuesday, marking a new five-and-a-half-year low as traders bet that the global oversupply of oil will continue deep into 2015. The benchmark has fallen more than 45pc since June and is on track for its worst year since 2008, while oil traded in the US is now poised to crash through the $50 per barrel level. "Oil bulls are having another hard week as Brent oil dropped to $56.90, a new five-year low, as lingering worries over supply excess overwhelmed fear of Libya supply disruptions," said Peter Rosenstreich, head of market...
  • First Recorded Case of Ebola in the UK

    12/29/2014 4:20:08 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 16 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 29/12/14 | Tova Dvorin
    A female aid worker from Sierra Leone has become the first person to bring Ebola to the United Kingdom, BBC News reports Monday night, and is in isolation in a Glasgow hospital. The aid worker, whose identity is being kept under wraps, had arrived in Glasgow via Casablanca and London's Heathrow airport, and arrived in Scotland Sunday night close to midnight. Less than eight hours later, she was admitted to Glasgow's Gartnavel Hospital with symptoms. She will be transferred to a high-level isolation unit in London's Royal Free Hospital as soon as possible for further treatment, officials said. 71 passengers...
  • Glasgow Healthcare Worker Diagnosed With Ebola

    12/29/2014 1:32:21 PM PST · by RightGeek · 37 replies
    Sky News ^ | 12/29/2014 | None creditied
    A female healthcare worker who returned to Glasgow from Sierra Leone last night has been confirmed as having Ebola. The woman, possibly a nurse, returned to Scotland via Casablanca and London Heathrow, arriving into Glasgow Airport on a British Airways flight at around 11.30pm. The patient was admitted to hospital early this morning after feeling unwell and was placed into isolation at 7.50am. She is in a stable condition. She has been isolated and is receiving treatment in the specialist Brownlee Unit for Infectious Diseases on the Gartnavel Hospital campus, but will be taken to the Royal Free Hospital in...
  • 120-114 BC: The Cimbrian flood and the following Cimbrian war 113-101 BC

    12/14/2014 12:59:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    climate4you ^ | before 2014 | unattributed
    The Cimbrian flood (or Cymbrian flood) was a large-scale incursion of the North Sea in the region of the Jutland peninsula (Denmark) in the period 120 to 114 BC, resulting in a permanent change of coastline with much land lost. The flood was caused by one or several very strong storm(s). A high number of people living in the affected area of Jutland drowned, and the flooding apparently set off a migration of the Cimbri tribes previously settled there (Lamb 1991)... The Cimbri were a tribe from Northern Europe, who, together with the Proto-Germanic Teutones and the Ambrones threatened the...
  • Hadrian's Wall dig unearths 2,000-year-old toilet seat

    08/28/2014 6:07:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 27, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old, perfectly preserved wooden toilet seat at a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland. Experts at Vindolanda believe it is the only find of its kind and dates from the 2nd Century. The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. The seat was discovered in a muddy trench, which was previously filled with rubbish. Dr Andrew Birley, director of excavations at Vindolanda, said: "We know a lot about Roman toilets from previous excavations at the site and from the wider Roman world, which have included...
  • Ancient graves hint at cultural shift to Anglo-Saxon Britain

    02/17/2014 1:08:17 PM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 2-14-2014 | Alex Peel
    Human remains dug up from an ancient grave in Oxfordshire add to a growing body of evidence that Britain's fifth-century transition from Roman to Anglo-Saxon was cultural rather than bloody. The traditional historical narrative is one of brutal conquest, with invaders from the North wiping out and replacing the pre-existing population. But a new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, hints at a more peaceful process. Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, is one of the study's authors. 'The main controversy over the years has centred on how many Anglo-Saxons came across the North Sea,' he says. 'Was...
  • A tablet bearing a birthday party invite includes the earliest Latin script penned by a woman

    09/10/2013 5:34:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Monday, August 12, 2013 | unattributed
    On the Roman Empire’s cold and rainy northern frontier, in what is now Britian, sat the fort of Vindolanda. Beginning in 1973, excavators there began to find waterlogged tablets and fragments of tablets covered with Roman cursive writing. Once conserved and deciphered, the tablets provided rare details of the daily life and workings of the fort -- lists of necessary supplies, including bacon, oysters, and honey; a letter to a soldier from home saying that more socks, sandals, and underwear have been sent; and descriptions of the native Britons the Romans came into contact with. Among the tablets -- the...
  • German battlefield yields Roman surprises

    05/13/2013 6:09:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    CNN ^ | 2009 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have found more than 600 relics from a huge battle between a Roman army and Barbarians in the third century, long after historians believed Rome had given up control of northern Germany. "We have to write our history books new, because what we thought was that the activities of the Romans ended at nine or 10 (years) after Christ," said Lutz Stratmann, science minister for the German state of Lower Saxony. "Now we know that it must be 200 or 250 after that." For weeks, archeologist Petra Loenne and her team have been searching this area with metal detectors,...
  • Dunning Iron Age find shows Roman-Pictish link

    09/01/2011 6:35:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 31st 2011 | unattributed
    Archaeologists working near the village of Dunning found an Iron Age broch which has evidence of early contact between the Picts and the Roman Empire. The broch -- a drystone wall structure -- is the first of its kind to be found in the Scottish lowlands for 100 years. Evidence shows that the Roman dwelling was destroyed by fire and then probably reoccupied by a Pictish warlord... Brochs were the preferred residence of the elite during Roman times. The team said the "exquisitely preserved" Dunning example was built at the top of a hill and offers a 360-degree views of...
  • The Secrets of Caerleon

    08/14/2011 3:20:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Wednesday, August 10, 2011 | unattributed
    For more than 2000 years a suburb of monumental Roman buildings lay undiscovered beneath a modern South Wales town, but now archaeologists from Cardiff University hope to reveal the secrets of this fascinating ancient site. In spring 2010, staff and students from the School of History, Archaeology and Religion located a complex of buildings outside the Roman fortress at Caerleon. The 'Lost City of the Legion' -- as it has been called -- was completely unknown and is a major addition to our knowledge of Roman Britain. Geophysical surveys taken by the Cardiff team at the time of the discovery...
  • Vindolanda Tablets come home

    09/29/2010 8:09:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Hexham Courant ^ | Monday, September 27, 2010 | Ruth Lognonne
    Britain's favourite treasures, the Vindolanda Tablets, are coming home to Tynedale. The world famous wooden blocks, detailing the minutiae of life in Roman Britain, will be housed at Vindolanda, near Bardon Mill, where they were first discovered in a muddy ditch in 1973. A £4 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund has made it possible to bring nine of the precious artefacts back to the Roman fort and museum, where they will go on permanent display. After the initial find, by former Vindolanda Trust director Robin Birley in 1973, around 400 of the perfectly preserved archaeological treasure chests have...
  • Hadrian's Wall child murder: estimated time of death pre-367AD

    09/16/2010 7:59:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1+ views
    Guardian ^ | Wednesday, September 15, 2010 | Martin Wainwright
    The murderous reputation of one of Britain's best-known Roman towns has been raised by the discovery of a child's hastily buried skeleton under a barrack room floor. Archaeologists at Vindolanda fort near Hadrian's Wall are preparing for a repeat of a celebrated coroner's inquest in the 1930s that concluded two other corpses unearthed near the site were "victims of murder by persons unknown shortly before 367AD". The latest discovery at the frontier settlement in Northumberland is thought to be the remains of a girl aged between eight and 10 who may have been tied up before she died. Her burial...
  • Hadrian's Wall lights up to mark 1600th anniversary of the end of Roman rule

    03/14/2010 5:45:20 PM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 64 replies · 1,804+ views
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 14th March 2010 | Rhianna King
    The majestic Hadrian's Wall is an awe-inspiring sight at the best of times. But last night it took on a magical new light as 500 flaming torches were dotted end to end along the 84-mile long Roman fortification. As night fell, a group of 500 volunteers holding gas-powered beacons and standing 250m apart created a 30 minute 'line of light' in a spectacle to mark the 1600th anniversary of the end of Roman rule.
  • Ancient Britain Had Apartheid-Like Society, Study Suggests

    07/28/2009 1:25:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies · 2,229+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | July 21, 2006 | Kate Ravilious
    When Anglo-Saxons first arrived in Britain 1,600 years ago, they created an apartheid-like society that oppressed the native Britons and wiped out almost all of the British gene pool, according to a new study. By treating Britons like slaves and imposing strict rules, the small band of Anglo-Saxons -- who had come from what is now Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands -- quickly dominated the country, leaving a legacy of Germanic genes and the English language, both of which still dominate Britain today. The new theory helps explain historical, archaeological, and genetic evidence that until now had seemed contradictory, including...
  • Mysterious ancient altar found in Roman fort (In England)

    07/25/2009 7:09:40 AM PDT · by decimon · 35 replies · 1,103+ views
    Discovery ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    This 1.5-ton, four-foot high carved stone relic shows a godlike figure standing on a bull, with a thunderbolt in one hand and a battle axe in the other. It is a representation of the Anatolian god Juppiter of Doliche, which was believed to be a favorite deity among Roman soldiers. A massive altar dedicated to an eastern cult deity has emerged during excavations of a Roman fort in northern England. Weighing 1.5 tons, the four-foot high ornately carved stone relic, was unearthed at the Roman fort of Vindolanda, which was built by order of the Emperor Hadrian between 122-30 A.D....
  • Roman era reveals expenses claims

    06/08/2009 6:57:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 451+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, May 29, 2009 | unattributed
    Writing tablets uncovered near Hadrian's Wall detail hundreds of expenses claimed by Roman officials... Five of the translated tablets contain 111 lines detailing entertainment claims at the Roman camp of Vindolanda. The items include ears of grain, hobnails for boots, bread, cereals, hides and pigs. The wooden writing tablets - which date from the 2nd Century - were discovered at Vindolanda, the Roman encampment near Hadrian's Wall in 1973... Professor Tony Birley, who translated the tablets, said they detail hundreds of expense claims and "lavish parties" held for officers... The wooden tablets, which are held at the British Museum in...
  • Hadrian's wall boosted economy for ancient Britons, archaeologists discover

    11/24/2008 3:51:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 798+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Patrick Sawer
    The 73-mile long Roman wall, built in AD 122 to defend the Roman Empire from hostile Celtic tribes, created a thriving economy to serve the occupying army, according to aerial surveys. Farmers, traders, craftsmen, labourers and prostitutes seized the occasion to make money from the presence of hundreds of Roman troops... The research carried out by English Heritage has revealed over 2,700 previously unrecorded historic features, including prehistoric burial mounds and first century farmsteads, medieval sheep farms, 19th century lead mines and even a WWII gun battery, sited along the 15 foot high wall which stretched from Wallsend on the...
  • Antonine Wall set to take centre stage

    07/09/2008 9:42:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies · 46+ views
    Sunday Times ^ | July 6, 2008 | Richard Wilson
    It begins in Old Kilpatrick, on the River Clyde, and ends in Bo'ness on the Firth of Forth. It runs inconspicuously by cemeteries, schools and rows of shops, along streets where pedestrians walk, probably unknowingly, along its spine. In some places railway tracks and roads cross it, in others the trains and traffic race alongside. The Antonine Wall is Scottish history's forgotten legacy. Yet when members of Unesco's World Heritage Committee meet in Quebec tomorrow, the wall -- built by the Romans in AD142 -- will be on their agenda. Having applied for World Heritage Site status, it is on...
  • Romans Were Upper Crust On Daily Bread

    05/21/2008 3:38:38 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 120+ views
    Journal Live ^ | 5-21-1008 | Tony Henderson
    Romans were upper crust on daily bread May 21 2008 by Tony Henderson, The Journal WHEN it came to their daily bread, troops at a Northumberland Roman fort took no chances. Excavations at Vindolanda are revealing two massive granaries whose quality even outshone the nearby commanding officer’s quarters. The dig is also uncovering a magnificent flagged roadway next to the granaries. “The masonry of these granaries is far superior to that of the nearby commanding officer’s residence, and although some of the walls have suffered from stone robbing, others are standing to a height of around 5ft,” said director of...
  • Excavations In Iran Unravel Mystery Of 'Red Snake'

    02/19/2008 3:02:57 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 744+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2-19-2008 | University of Edinburgh.
    Excavations In Iran Unravel Mystery Of 'Red Snake' ScienceDaily (Feb. 18, 2008) — New discoveries unearthed at an ancient frontier wall in Iran provide compelling evidence that the Persians matched the Romans for military might and engineering prowess. The 'Great Wall of Gorgan'in north-eastern Iran, a barrier of awesome scale and sophistication, including over 30 military forts, an aqueduct, and water channels along its route, is being explored by an international team of archaeologists from Iran and the Universities of Edinburgh and Durham. This vast Wall-also known as the 'Red Snake'-is more than 1000 years older than the Great Wall...
  • The Romans Carried Out Cataract Operations

    02/09/2008 6:46:48 PM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 215+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-9-2008 | Jane Elliott
    The Romans carried out cataract ops By Jane Elliott Health reporter, BBC News An eye stamp: the equivalent of the modern medicine label Think of the Roman legacy to Britain and many things spring to mind - straight roads, under-floor heating, aqueducts and public baths. But they were also pioneers in the health arena - particularly in the area of eye care, with remedies for various eye conditions such as short-sightedness and conjunctivitis. Perhaps most surprisingly of all is that the Romans - and others from ancient times, including the Chinese, Indians and Greeks - were also able also to...
  • An Outing For Hadrian At The British Museum

    01/10/2008 7:13:28 PM PST · by blam · 17 replies · 283+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 1-11-2008 | Nigel Reynolds
    An outing for Hadrian at the British Museum By Nigel Reynolds Last Updated: 2:48am GMT 11/01/2008 An exhibition on the Roman emperor Hadrian - the first staged anywhere in the world - is to be mounted at the British Museum this summer, replacing the First Emperor terracotta warriors show which closes in April. Negotiations over several years will see more than 200 loans from 31 countries - most of them once under the Roman yoke - being put on display in London. The British Museum’s Ralph Jackson with the bronze bust of Hadrian fished out of the Thames Though Hadrian,...
  • Hunting For Hadrian

    01/25/2007 3:26:10 PM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 540+ views
    News And Star ^ | 1-25-2007
    Hunting for Hadrian Published on 25/01/2007 HISTORIANS hope to unearth evidence that Roman emperor Hadrian once stayed in a fort along the magnificent wall bearing his name. Archaeologists will be digging along Hadrian’s Wall this summer in an attempt to confirm speculation about why and when it was built. They hope their work at Vindolanda in Northumbria will prove that the emperor once stayed there on a visit to the wall, as well as unlocking secrets about the Roman army and people’s political and social lives. The 73-mile stone barrier – stretching east to west from the River Tyne to...
  • Spectacular Brooch Find May 'Unlock Secrets Of Hadrian's Wall'

    05/20/2006 3:19:11 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 1,543+ views
    Dash24 ^ | 5-17-2006 | Jon Land
    Spectacular brooch find may 'unlock secrets of Hadrian's Wall' Publisher: Jon Land Published: 17/05/2006 - 12:08:01 PM Hadrian's Wall A 'spectacular' small brooch has been uncovered at a Roman fort that may reveal secrets about the men that built Hadrian's Wall. The discovery of the legionary soldier's expensive and prestigious cloak brooch has excited archaeologists in Northumberland. Experts have discovered that the brooch belonged to soldier Quintus Sollonius who would have been stationed at the forefront of the Roman empire 2,000 years ago. Historians are continuing to examine the artefact and believe it could reveal more secrets behind the men...
  • Romans May Have Learned From Chinese Great Wall: Archaeologists

    12/20/2005 9:59:10 AM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 1,640+ views
    Romans may have learned from Chinese Great Wall: archaeologists The construction of the Roman Limes was quite possibly influenced by the concept of the Great Wall in China, though the two great buildings of the world are far away from each other, said archaeologists and historians. Although there is no evidence that the two constructions had any direct connections, indirect influence from the Great Wall on the Roman Limes is certain, said Visy Zsolt, a professor with the Department of Ancient History and Archaeology of the University of Pecs in Hungary. Visy made the remarks in an interview with Xinhua...
  • Pyromania (Roman Fort Excavated at Brougham)

    04/29/2005 11:20:04 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies · 1,315+ views
    British Archaeology ^ | January/Febuary 2005 | Hilary Cool
    Everyone who lived at the Roman fort at Brougham, Cumbria, was buried in a cemetery close by. Excavation of the graves revealed an astonishing world of pagan beliefs. Hilary Cool explainsSome sites are dug before their time. Such was the case with the cemetery at Brougham in Cumbria. Brougham was long ago identified with Brocavum, a place noted in the 3rd century AD road book known as the Antonine Itinerary. Antiquarian reports had recorded Roman tombstones from the area east of the fort and vicus, an attached civilian settlement, alongside the trans-Pennine road. So excavations were planned when it was...
  • Fragments of Ancient Empire

    04/06/2005 1:41:43 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 2 replies · 455+ views
    The Evening Chronicle ^ | Apr 4 2005 | Jamie Diffley
    The archaeological season has begun at the Roman site of Vindolanda, bringing in volunteers from all over the world. Jamie Diffley went along to ask why they dig it.Pressed down in the clay, almost completely covered by the dirt, lies an object. Could be a piece of Roman pottery, perhaps some glass. To the untrained eye it could just be a piece of ordinary rubble. "It is ordinary rubble," says archaeologist Andrew Birley, loading it into a wheelbarrow, which will then be dumped by the side. Unlike me Andrew does have a trained eye. Indeed he has two. They're trained...
  • Hope for further Vindolanda tablet discoveries

    05/05/2014 1:10:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Wednesday, April 30, 2014 | Vindolanda Trust
    The site of Roman Vindolanda, in the central section of Hadrian’s Wall, had over 300 years of Roman occupation, with at least nine forts and settlements built one on top of the other... was one of the main military posts on the northern frontier of Britain before the building of Hadrian’s Wall. Excavations there in 1973 uncovered writing tablets which had been preserved in waterlogged conditions in rubbish deposits in and around the commanding officer’s residence. These, and hundreds of other fragments which have come to light in subsequent excavations, are the oldest surviving handwritten documents in Britain, containing everything...
  • Rush Limbaugh: James Bond can't be black like Idris Elba!

    12/24/2014 5:00:51 AM PST · by Libloather · 83 replies
    MSN ^ | 12/23/14 | Daniel Gates
    **SNIP** After mentioning the Sony emails and telling his listeners who Elba is, Limbaugh said, “Here’s the thing, though… James Bond is a fictional character, obviously. James Bond was invented, created by Ian Fleming… and James Bond is… white and Scottish. Period. That is who James Bond is.” “But now Sony is suggesting that the next James Bond should be Idris Elba, a black Briton rather than a white from Scotland,” continued Limbaugh. “But that’s NOT who James Bond is, and I know it’s racist to probably even point this out… We had 50 years of white Bonds because Bond...
  • Six people killed and eight injured in Glasgow bin lorry crash

    12/23/2014 1:20:59 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    bbc.com ^ | 22 December 2014 | bbc
    Six people have been killed and eight others injured after an out-of-control bin lorry crashed into pedestrians in central Glasgow. ... The square is the scene of Glasgow's annual Christmas festival.
  • Court Tells Pro-Life Midwives They Must Participate in Abortions or Lose Their Jobs

    12/17/2014 5:28:25 PM PST · by Morgana · 5 replies
    LIFE NEWS ^ | 12/17/14 | Steven Ertelt
    In a horrible defeat for conscience rights for medical professionals, a British court today ruled that a pair of midwives who didn’t want to be involved in assisting abortions must do so. Midwives Mary Doogan and Connie Wood won a lower court decision last year but the UK’s Supreme Court heard an appeal brought by the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, which is supported by the pro-abortion British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) and the Royal College of Midwives. The midwives, with more than 20 years’ experience, initially lost their cases against their employers in the Outer House of the Court...
  • Scottish monk arrested for distributing leaflets promoting sexual morality

    12/13/2014 8:54:12 PM PST · by Morgana · 13 replies
    Life Site news ^ | Dec 12, 2014 | Thaddeus Baklinski
    A Scottish monk has been arrested for distributing a series of leaflets in the Cambridgeshire area critical of homosexuality, fornication, contraception, euthanasia, abortion, and divorce. Brother Damon Jonah Kelly, head of the Glasgow based charity the Black Hermits, was arrested by Cambridgeshire Police on December 8 on suspicion of a Section 5 (religious/racial) public order offence after he wrote a letter to the homosexual news publication, Pink News, claiming responsibility for the distribution of leaflets in the city of Ely, as well as in Cambridge, King’s Lynn and several other Cambridgeshire towns and cities. Initially police declined to take any...
  • Scottish Monk Arrested for Distributing Leaflets Promoting Sexual Morality

    12/13/2014 1:49:15 PM PST · by marshmallow · 21 replies
    LifeSite News ^ | 12/12/14 | Thaddeus Baklinski
    A Scottish monk has been arrested for distributing a series of leaflets in the Cambridgeshire area critical of homosexuality, fornication, contraception, euthanasia, abortion, and divorce. Brother Damon Jonah Kelly, head of the Glasgow based charity the Black Hermits, was arrested by Cambridgeshire Police on December 8 on suspicion of a Section 5 (religious/racial) public order offence after he wrote a letter to the homosexual news publication, Pink News, claiming responsibility for the distribution of leaflets in the city of Ely, as well as in Cambridge, King’s Lynn and several other Cambridgeshire towns and cities. Initially police declined to take any...
  • Unearthed: hoard of Roman and Pictish silver found in Aberdeenshire field

    12/07/2014 8:21:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Herald Scotland ^ | Wednesday 3 December 2014 | unattributed
    A hoard of Roman and Pictish silver has been unearthed by archaeologists working in a field in Aberdeenshire. The find, which contains more than 100 pieces including coins and jewellery, has been hailed as the most northern of its kind in Europe. The discovery was made earlier this year by archaeologists from National Museums Scotland and the University of Aberdeen's Northern Picts project at an undisclosed location. It will now become the subject of a programme of research involving detailed analysis and cataloguing through the Glenmorangie Research Project - a three-year sponsorship of National Museums Scotland to support the study...
  • Revealed, 'up to 60' British women who rule ISIS's capital by fear: 'Jihadettes' boast of being in

    12/04/2014 7:53:53 AM PST · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 4, 2014 | John Hall
    Dozens of young British women are using social media to boast of joining the Islamic State's terrifying all-female police force – claiming to be doling out savage beatings, punishment lashings, ordering executions and managing brothels where thousands of Yazidi sex slaves are imprisoned and raped daily after being sold for as little as £27. Britons including privately-educated Glaswegian Aqsa Mahmood, 20, and Lewisham-born Khadijah Dare, 22, are understood to have joined the Al-Khansa Brigade in ISIS' Syrian de facto capital Raqqa, helping to patrol the city with guns and daggers hidden beneath their religious robes. The group, which is largely...