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Keyword: scotlandyet

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  • Historian Won't Let Scotland's Most Famous Dog Lie

    09/04/2011 3:23:55 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 49 replies
    WSJ ^ | 9-4-11 | James Hookway
    EDINBURGH, Scotland—To millions of people around the world, he's the loyal dog who kept a lonely vigil at his master's graveside. Greyfriars Bobby, a Skye terrier, supposedly spent 14 years pining by the grave of his owner, a local known as Auld Jock who died in 1858. The tale of devotion has beguiled generations of visitors to Scotland's capital and inspired dozens of children's books and a 1961 Disney film, "Greyfriars Bobby: The True Story of a Dog." Greyfriars Bobby .But to Swedish historian Jan Bondeson, the 150-year-old legend of the dog that stuck it out through snow, hail and...
  • Scottish treasure trove revealed (Iron Age)

    09/02/2011 5:31:05 PM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | September 2, 2011 | Unknown
    A hoard of gold Iron Age torcs found near Stirling is among the highlights of the sixth annual Scottish Treasure Trove report.The torcs - which earned the finder a reward of £462,000 - were found in 2009 but reported to the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer last year. Other "outstanding" finds were a gold button unearthed in Perth and Kinross and a Papal Bulla found in Fife. Discoveries were also made in East Lothian and the Scottish Borders. The report covers the period from 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 and details finds dealt with by the remembrancer and...
  • Dunning Iron Age find shows Roman-Pictish link

    09/01/2011 6:35:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 31st 2011 | unattributed
    Archaeologists working near the village of Dunning found an Iron Age broch which has evidence of early contact between the Picts and the Roman Empire. The broch -- a drystone wall structure -- is the first of its kind to be found in the Scottish lowlands for 100 years. Evidence shows that the Roman dwelling was destroyed by fire and then probably reoccupied by a Pictish warlord... Brochs were the preferred residence of the elite during Roman times. The team said the "exquisitely preserved" Dunning example was built at the top of a hill and offers a 360-degree views of...
  • National Tartan Day, 2008

    04/04/2008 6:36:30 PM PDT · by mdittmar · 94 replies · 290+ views
    The White House ^ | April 4, 2008 | GEORGE W. BUSH
    A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America Americans of Scottish descent have made enduring contributions to our Nation with their hard work, faith, and values. On National Tartan Day, we celebrate the spirit and character of Scottish Americans and recognize their many contributions to our culture and our way of life. Scotland and the United States have long shared ties of family and friendship, and many of our country's most cherished customs and ideals first grew to maturity on Scotland's soil. The Declaration of Arbroath, the Scottish Declaration of Independence signed in 1320, embodied the Scots'...
  • The English question holds the key to victory (A Devolution of the UK?)

    09/29/2007 4:39:38 AM PDT · by shrinkermd · 15 replies · 117+ views
    Telegraph UK ^ | 29 September 2007 | Frank Field
    A Newsnight survey found that a clear 61 per cent of English voters think they should have their own parliament and that this proposition was supported by a majority of Scottish voters. Another poll revealed that a greater proportion of English voters wanted independence for England than did Scottish voters for Scotland. The English question is the great giant in British politics that is now beginning to awake from slumber induced by the first devolution of power to Scotland. "English votes for English issues" is fed by a number of specific grievances that increasingly grate with English taxpayers. • Frail...
  • Eminent Historian Debunks Scottish History As Largely Fabrication

    05/19/2008 4:05:09 PM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 201+ views
    The Times Online ^ | 5-18-2008 | Stuart MacDonald
    Eminent historian debunks Scottish history as largely fabricationA book by the late Hugh Trevor-Roperand due to be published five years after his death argues that Scottish history is based on myths and falsehoods Stuart MacDonald SCOTLAND’S history is weaved from a “fraudulent” fabric of “myths and falsehoods”, according to an explosive new study by one of the world’s most eminent historians. The Invention of Scotland: Myth and History, is the last book, and one of the most controversial, written by the late Hugh Trevor-Roper. Now, five years after his death, the book is to be published at one of the...
  • Scots and the American Civil War

    04/13/2011 3:25:29 AM PDT · by MadMitch · 64 replies · 1+ views
    http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/features/Scots-and-the-American-Civil.6750042.jp IN May, 1864 a young Glaswegian by the name of Bennet Graham Burley stared at the dark, dirty water rising up through a grille and flooding over the floor of his cell and considered his alternatives, neither of which were good. He could remain in this dank, filthy cell in the Union prison on Pea Patch Island in the middle of the Delaware
  • Culloden find shows Jacobites gave good account

    07/31/2005 3:03:10 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 24 replies · 932+ views
    Scotsman ^ | Fri 29 Jul 2005
    HISTORY is set to be re-written after archeologists revealed the Jacobite army were far closer to winning the battle of Culloden than previously thought. The battle, which went down in history as a decisive victory for the notorious Duke of Cumberland, marked the end of the '45 rebellion and left lasting scars on the Scottish psyche. And for centuries it has been believed that the red-coated government soldiers had utterly destroyed the indisciplined, untrained Jacobite forces of Bonnie Prince Charlie. But new excavations of the 1746 battleground which has since become part of Scottish folklore have discovered the Jacobites came...
  • King Arthur's round table may have been found by archaeologists in Scotland

    08/26/2011 1:05:30 PM PDT · by Palter · 45 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 26 Aug 2011 | Telegraph
    Archaeologists searching for King Arthur's round table have found a "circular feature" beneath the historic King's Knot in Stirling. The King's Knot, a geometrical earthwork in the former royal gardens below Stirling Castle, has been shrouded in mystery for hundreds of years. Though the Knot as it appears today dates from the 1620s, its flat-topped central mound is thought to be much older. Writers going back more than six centuries have linked the landmark to the legend of King Arthur. Archaeologists from Glasgow University, working with the Stirling Local History Society and Stirling Field and Archaeological Society, conducted the first...
  • Mystery over Roman battle may rule it out from list (Scotland)

    08/26/2011 12:57:34 PM PDT · by decimon · 3 replies
    BBC ^ | August 25, 2011 | Steven McKenzie
    The most northerly battle fought by imperial Rome could be left out of an inventory of Scottish battlefields due to uncertainty over the site.Mons Graupius in AD 83 or 84 saw the 9th Hispana, its cohorts and Roman cavalry defeat 30,000 Caledonians. Locations suggested in the past include Dunning in Perthshire, Carpow in Fife, Bennachie in Aberdeenshire and Culloden in the Highlands. Historic Scotland said an accurate site was needed for inclusion on its list. > In his book, Dando-Collins connects Mons Graupius with the disappearance of the 9th after it was later posted to Carlisle. He said Caledonians had...
  • Burial site find delays new Skye medical centre

    08/14/2011 2:06:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    BBC ^ | August 12, 2011 | unattibuted
    An archaeologist has uncovered the remains of an ancient burial cist and pottery at the site of a new £1.3m health centre on Skye. No human remains have been found, but further excavations and chemical tests on material recovered will delay the building project for about two weeks. Archaeologist Steven Birch also found a cairn and an underground structure known as a souterrain. NHS Highland said it still expected the centre to be completed by March 2012. The finds could date from the Iron Age. Mr Birch, of West Coast Archaeological Services, said: "There is a surprising range of important...
  • Ancient Egypt was destroyed by drought, discover Scottish experts

    08/04/2011 5:51:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    Scotsman, Tall and Handsome Built ^ | Tuesday, August 2, 2011 | Lyndsay Buckland
    ...the fall of the great Egyptian Old Kingdom may have been helped along by a common problem which remains with us now -- drought... a severe period of drought around 4,200 years ago may have contributed to the demise of the civilisation. Using seismic investigations with sound waves, along with carbon dating of a 100-metre section of sediment from the bed of Lake Tana in Ethiopia, the team were able to look back many thousands of years. They were able to see how water levels in the lake had varied over the past 17,000 years, with the sediment signalling lush...
  • Submerged prehistory off Scotland: a development-led perspective

    07/23/2011 6:38:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Sunday, July 17, 2011 | Dr Andrew Bicket
    Throughout the 19th century there have been reports and scholarly discussions of submerged forests and artefacts from now-submerged environments around the coasts and seas of Britain (Coles 1998). Since the publication of Doggerland: a speculative study by Prof. Bryony Coles in 1998, there has been significant progress in the active investigation of submerged prehistoric landscapes around the coasts of the UK. To date much of this progress has been focused around the coasts of England and Wales, partly as a consequence of the geographical distribution of available funding streams i.e. the Marine element of the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF)....
  • Mesolithic 'rest stop' found at new Sainsbury's site

    07/23/2011 6:28:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    BBC ^ | 18 July 2011 | unattributed
    Archaeologists believe the remains of burned oak uncovered at the site of the first Sainsbury's in the Highlands to be evidence of an ancient "rest stop". The supermarket and a filling station are being constructed on the outskirts of Nairn, at a cost of about £20m. Headland Archaeologists investigated the site ahead of building work. They radiocarbon-dated the hearth to the Mesolithic period, which started as the last Ice Age ended about 12,000 years ago. ...the archaeologists said the fire appeared to have been made to provide heat and not cooking, because no food waste was found... "The dating of...
  • Archaeologists discover a hoard of silver Roman denarii coins at Vindolanda

    07/22/2011 4:51:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Wednesday, July 13, 2011 | unattributed
    A hoard of twenty one silver denarii has been recovered during the recent excavation of the foundations of a clay floor in a centurion's apartment of the late Antonine period (cAD180-200) at Vindolanda, northeast England. The hoard had been buried, possibly in a purse or some similar organic package which had long since rotted away, in a shallow pit within the foundation material of the floor of the structure in the middle of the room. Dr Andrew Birley, director of excavations at the site explains, "The coins were tightly packed together and several had corroded onto one another, held together...
  • A Lost World? Atlantis-Like Landscape Discovered

    07/12/2011 7:24:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Sunday, July 10, 2011 | Wynne Parry
    Buried deep beneath the sediment of the North Atlantic Ocean lies an ancient, lost landscape with furrows cut by rivers and peaks that once belonged to mountains. Geologists recently discovered this roughly 56-million-year-old landscape using data gathered for oil companies. "It looks for all the world like a map of a bit of a country onshore," said Nicky White, the senior researcher. "It is like an ancient fossil landscape preserved 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) beneath the seabed." So far, the data have revealed a landscape about 3,861 square miles (10,000 square km) west of the Orkney-Shetland Islands that stretched above...
  • Prehistoric finds on remote St Kilda's Boreray isle (Scotland)

    06/16/2011 7:30:18 PM PDT · by decimon · 10 replies
    BBC ^ | June 16, 2011 | Unknown
    The remains of a permanent settlement which could date back to the Iron Age has been uncovered on a remote Scottish island, according to archaeologists.It was previously thought Boreray in the St Kilda archipelago was only visited by islanders to hunt seabirds and gather wool from sheep. Archaeologists have now recorded an extensive agricultural field system and terraces for cultivating crops. They have also found an intact stone building buried under soil and turf. St Kilda's group of small islands are the remotest part of the British Isles, lying 41 miles (66km) west of the Western Isles. Hirta, the main...
  • 'Incredibly exciting' rare pre-Ice Age handaxe discovered on Orkney

    06/11/2011 9:44:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    STV News ^ | Tuesday, June 7, 2011 | unattributed
    The Palaeolithic -- or Old Stone Age -- tool, which could be anything between 100,000 and 450,000 years old, is one of only ten ever to be found in Scotland. The axe, which was found on a stretch of shore in St Ola by a local man walking along the beach, is the oldest man-made artefact ever found in Orkney. The stone tool, which is around five-and-a-half inches long, has been broken, and originally would have tapered to a point opposite the cutting edge, but at some point in time, the point broke off and someone reworked the flint to...
  • Dig Unearths 1,500 Year Old 'Tarbat Man' (Pict)

    09/23/2005 4:05:01 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,685+ views
    North Star ^ | 9-22-2005
    Dig unearths 1,500 year old 'Tarbat Man' HUMAN remains have been discovered at Portmahomack - but police will not be called in as the skeleton is thought to be around 1,500 years old and likely to be that of a Pictish monk. The discovery was made by archaeologists from the University of York who come to the Port each season to dig in the grounds of the Tarbat Old Church, one of the most important Pictish sites in Scotland. They are excited by the find came in the last week of the archaeological dig and means that the team will...
  • Skeleton of Amazon warrior discovered

    05/26/2011 5:29:47 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 4 replies
    The Scotsman ^ | 5-27-11 | Frank Urquhart
    THE discovery of the remains of an aristocratic Scottish "Amazon", killed in battle during the Wars of Independence, is set to rewrite the history books. Her skeleton was among the remains of five "high status" individuals - all of whom had suffered violent deaths - found beneath the paved floor of the "lost" Royal Chapel at Stirling Castle. The woman - simply known as "skeleton 539" - was a robust and muscular female, standing 5ft 4in tall. Archaeologists had previously suspected she had been a courtier at the Royal palace during the reign of Alexander 11. But detailed forensic tests...