Keyword: seaurchin

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  • Diets of the middle and lower class in Pompeii revealed

    01/05/2014 7:13:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 1-2-2014 | Dawn Fuller
    University of Cincinnati archaeologists are turning up discoveries in the famed Roman city of Pompeii that are wiping out the historic perceptions of how the Romans dined, with the rich enjoying delicacies such as flamingos and the poor scrounging for soup or gruel. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, will present these discoveries on Jan. 4, at the joint annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and American Philological Association (APA) in Chicago. UC teams of archaeologists have spent more than a decade at two city blocks within a non-elite district in the Roman...
  • Sea urchin could lead to knives that never need sharpening

    12/25/2010 5:49:30 PM PST · by the invisib1e hand · 59 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Dec 25, 2010
    A sea urchin with teeth that can eat through stone could one day lead to knives which never need sharpening. The creatures have self-honing teeth which allow them to chomp through stone, carving out hideaways on rocky shores. Scientists have now learned how the urchins keep their teeth razor-sharp and believe that technology based on the same principle could create everlasting bladed tools. Analysing the teeth of the California purple sea urchin, the scientists found a complex structure of layered calcite crystals held together by super-hard natural cement. Between ...
  • Envying the Tooth of the Sea Urchin (they used the word "design"--off with their heads!)

    04/02/2009 4:46:24 PM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 52 replies · 954+ views
    CEH ^ | March 31, 2009
    Envying the Tooth of the Sea Urchin March 31, 2009 — Did you know the lowly sea urchin has a tooth?  It’s not just any tooth: it’s “a remarkable grinding tool,” according to a team of international scientists.  They even used the word “exquisite” in the title of their paper in PNAS.1  Humans might benefit from knowing more about this tool.  “The improved understanding of these structural features,” they said, “could lead to the design of better mechanical grinding and cutting tools.”     The sea urchin “tooth” is not really a tooth, but a hard rod with a serrated...
  • A prickly subject: The sea urchin genome is sequenced

    11/11/2006 9:59:27 AM PST · by annie laurie · 8 replies · 434+ views
    Eurekalert.org ^ | 9-Nov-2006 | Jerilyn Bowers
    Scientists makes good use of its surprising similarity to humans BAR HARBOR, MAINE -- Nov. 9, 2006 Who would have guessed that the lowly sea urchin, that brain-less, limb-less porcupine of the sea, would be the star of a multi-million dollar, worldwide effort to map out every letter of its genetic code? Or that the information gathered in that effort may eventually lead to new treatments for cancer, infertility, blindness, and diseases like muscular dystrophy and Huntington's Disease?James Coffman, Ph.D., of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor was one of the scientists who helped decode the 814...