Keyword: shakespeare

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  • Shakespeare's Bloody Problem: Why the Tragedies Almost Never Work Anymore

    06/20/2014 12:35:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    One character, his torso already relieved of arms and legs, is tossed onto the barbecue. Another’s hands and tongue are severed to keep her from reporting a crime. (She’s then stabbed to death anyway.) Two more characters are beheaded; one behanded; one hanged. For those who like their violence more ironic, there’s this happy couple: the man left buried up to his neck to starve, the woman fed a pie made from the minced remains of her sons. The meal may give her heartburn, but it’s the subsequent stabbing that kills her. A Game of Thrones episode? No, it’s Titus...
  • Why is Shakespeare so mysterious? Because he was a Catholic in an age of vicious persecution

    04/23/2014 8:09:57 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 10 replies
    http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/ ^ | April 23, 2014 | Joseph Pearce
    Today is St George’s Day. It is also Shakespeare’s birthday and, believe it or not, it is the day on which Shakespeare died. Apart from the astonishing coincidence that Shakespeare died on his own birthday, it is also singularly appropriate that England’s greatest poet should have been born and should have died on the feast day of her patron saint. It seems appropriate, therefore, that we should celebrate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birthday with a reference to cricket, that most quintessential of all English sports. Shakespeare is “450, Not Out”, continuing to hit his audiences for six after reaching...
  • Why Shakespeare Belongs In Prison

    04/23/2014 9:37:36 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | APR 23 2014 | Karen Swallow
    The incarcerated may be the Bard's ideal modern audience.It's his 450th birthday, and The Bard has never appealed to a wider or more diverse audience. American higher-ed English departments may be teaching him less than they used to, but the Internet and modern film and TV interpretations have helped democratize appreciation of his works around the world. That’s only fitting: In Shakespeare’s era, the royalty in attendance at his productions was joined by crowds of commoners called “groundlings” and “stinkards” who paid a penny to stand in the pit, sweltering in the heat, while even more milled about outside. Related...
  • 45 Hamlets for Shakespeare's 450th Birthday - in Pictures

    04/23/2014 9:30:51 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    On the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, Michael Billington has picked the best Hamlets he's seen in each decade of his theatregoing life. To help you choose your own favourite Prince of Denmark, here are 45 actors who've found a method for the character's madness
  • Shakespeare Insult Kit

    12/08/2013 2:43:58 PM PST · by EveningStar · 23 replies
    Pete Levin ^ | Unknown
    Ye Olde Official Shakespearean Insult Kit Hello friends. Are you weary of giving voice to the same tired old invectives when boorish rubes intrude upon your serenity? Don't you wish you could inveigh your enemy with a genuinely classic put-down? Well, now you can. With this handy-dandy SHAKESPEAREAN INSULT KIT, you can have the spleen of The Bard at your disposal! The next time someone cuts you off in traffic, or a clerk behaves rudely, stun them with your lexicographical command of vituperation. Combine one selection from each of the four pull-down lists below, and impale your unsuspecting foe.
  • Shakespeare’s Plays Were Written By A Jewish Woman

    09/12/2013 4:21:40 AM PDT · by Renfield · 83 replies
    Jewcy.com ^ | 3-13-2008 | John Hudson
    For hundreds of years, people have questioned whether William Shakespeare wrote the plays that bear his name. The mystery is fueled by the fact that his biography simply doesn't match the areas of knowledge and skill demonstrated in the plays. Nearly a hundred candidates have been suggested, but none of them fit much better. Now a new candidate named Amelia Bassano Lanier—the so-called 'Dark Lady' of the Sonnets and a member of an Italian/Jewish family—has been shown to be a perfect fit. Here are eight reasons that are sure to convince you: 1. The Most Musical Plays in the World...
  • Hunchback King Richard III infected with worms

    09/04/2013 8:34:02 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 61 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep 3, 2013 9:17 PM EDT | Maria Cheng
    Not only was Richard III one of England’s most despised monarchs, but it now turns out the hunchback king was probably infected with parasitic worms that grew up to a foot in length. Researchers who dug up Richard III’s skeleton underneath a parking lot in Leicester last year now report they discovered numerous roundworm eggs in the soil around his pelvis, where his intestines would have been. They compared that to soil samples taken close to Richard’s skull and surrounding his grave. There were no eggs near the skull and only traces of eggs in the soil near the grave....
  • Macbeth's Castle Unearthed In Inverness Garden?

    05/28/2004 12:51:10 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 3,635+ views
    Macbeth's castle unearthed in Inverness garden? LOCAL history enthusiasts believe they have unearthed positive evidence that a former King of Scotland maintained a castle in Inverness. Tradition has persisted that Macbeth had a stronghold at Auldcastle Road in the Crown area of the city - hence the name. Now an archaeological dig by members of the Inverness Local History Forum in the garden of the appropriately-named house Dun Macbeth has uncovered what could be the most important finds to date. Some artefacts, including pieces of medieval glass and what are thought to be whalebone and porpoise or dolphin bones have...
  • Memorial Day

    05/26/2013 4:54:20 AM PDT · by michaelwlf3 · 10 replies
    Shakespeare
    This day is called the feast of Crispian: He that outlives this day, and comes safe home, Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named, And rouse him at the name of Crispian. He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours, And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:' Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars. And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.' Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot, But he'll remember with advantages What feats he did that day: then shall our names....
  • Was William Shakespeare the First Libertarian?

    04/03/2013 1:05:29 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 14 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | April 3, 2013 | Daniel J. Mitchell
    I’ve never been a big Shakespeare fan, but that may need to change. It seems the Bard of Avon may be the world’s first libertarian. Some of you are probably shaking your heads and saying that this is wrong, that Thomas Jefferson or Adam Smith are more deserving of this honor.Others would argue we should go back even earlier in time and give that title to John Locke.But based on some new research reported in Tax-news.com, Shakespeare preceded them all.Uncertainty over the likely future success of his plays led William Shakespeare to do “all he could to avoid taxes,” new...
  • Richard III: Facial reconstruction shows king's features

    02/25/2013 9:06:05 AM PST · by Red Badger · 59 replies
    BBC ^ | 5 February 2013 | Staff
    A facial reconstruction based on the skull of Richard III has revealed how the English king may have looked. The king's skeleton was found under a car park in Leicester during an archaeological dig. The reconstructed face has a slightly arched nose and prominent chin, similar to features shown in portraits of Richard III painted after his death. Historian and author John Ashdown-Hill said seeing it was "almost like being face to face with a real person". The development comes after archaeologists from the University of Leicester confirmed the skeleton found last year was the 15th Century king's, with DNA...
  • Body Under British Parking Lot May Be King Richard III

    12/29/2012 12:47:51 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 59 replies
    National Geographic ^ | December 28, 2012 | Heather Pringle
    Search for infamous monarch’s remains is the latest in the rush to dig up the dead and famousFor centuries, William Shakespeare seemed to have the last word. His Richard III glowered and leered from the stage, a monster in human form and a character so repugnant "that dogs bark at me as I halt by them." In Shakespeare's famous play, the hunchbacked king claws his way to the throne and methodically murders most of his immediate family—his wife, older brother, and two young nephews—until he suffers defeat and death on the battlefield at the hands of a young Tudor hero,...
  • Skeleton found in Leicester could be Richard III

    09/12/2012 9:09:02 PM PDT · by MrsEmmaPeel · 35 replies
    CBC News ^ | Sept 12, 2012 | CBC News
    Archeologists at the University of Leicester in central England say they have discovered a human skeleton with battle wounds and a curved spine that could be the remains of King Richard III.
  • Have UK archaeologists found Richard III's skeleton?

    09/12/2012 12:14:15 PM PDT · by TnGOP · 26 replies
    Reuters ^ | 09/12/2012 | Michael Holden
    (Reuters) - Archaeologists searching for the body of England's King Richard III under a city centre parking lot said on Wednesday they had found remains which could be those of the monarch depicted by Shakespeare as an evil, deformed, child-murdering monster.
  • New Battle of Bosworth Field site revealed [along with site of Richard III's murder]

    02/19/2010 7:43:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies · 668+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, February 19, 2010 | unattributed
    The true site of one of the most decisive battles in English history has been revealed. Bosworth, fought in 1485, which saw the death of Richard III, was believed to have taken place on Ambion Hill, near Sutton Cheney in Leicestershire. But a study of original documents and archaeological survey of the area has now pinpointed a site in fields more than a mile to the south west. A new trail will lead from the current visitor centre to the new location... The traditional site has a flag at the crest of the hill, a stone to mark the spot...
  • Bones Under Parking Lot Belonged to Richard III

    02/08/2013 7:24:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 31 replies
    NY Times ^ | February 4, 2013 | JOHN F. BURNS
    Until it was discovered beneath a city parking lot last fall, the skeleton had lain unmarked, and unmourned, for more than 500 years. Friars fearful of the men who slew him... --snip-- Dr. King said tests conducted at three laboratories in England and France had found that the descendants’ mitochondrial DNA, a genetic element inherited through the maternal line of descent, matched that extracted from the parking lot skeleton. She said all three samples belonged to a type of mitochondrial DNA that is carried by only 1 to 2 percent of the English population, a rare enough group to satisfy...
  • Richard III body found under Leicester car park

    02/07/2013 4:14:55 PM PST · by neverdem · 17 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 4 February 2013 | Patrick Walter
    The skeleton showing curvature of the spine (scoliosis) consistent with historical accounts © University of LeicesterThe mortal remains of England's warrior king Richard III have been found, bringing to a close a mystery that has puzzled scholars for centuries. Analytical tests on a skeleton found under a Leicester car park have confirmed the last resting place of the final king in the Plantagenet line.The announcement comes after months of feverish speculation. In September 2012, the University of Leicester announced that its detective work combing ancient texts had led its team to conclude that the King was buried at Greyfriars Monastery...
  • It IS King Richard III: Scientists reveal DNA results confirm regal identity of body...

    02/04/2013 3:11:38 AM PST · by naturalman1975 · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 4th February 2013 | Damien Gayle
    The body of a man killed in battle found beneath a social services office car park in Leicester is that of Richard III, DNA analysis confirmed today. Dr Turi King of the University of Leicester said that there was a DNA match between the maternal line of a descendant of the family of Richard III and the remains found beneath Grey Friars car park. Lead researcher Dr Richard Buckley added: 'It is the academic conclusion of the University of Leicester that beyond reasonable doubt the remains found in Leicester are that of Richard III, the last Plantagenet king of England.'...
  • Should Richard III Receive a Catholic Burial?

    02/06/2013 4:11:39 AM PST · by NYer · 104 replies
    First Things ^ | February 4, 2013 | Mark Movsesian
    You thought there couldn’t be a law and religion angle to today’s news—fascinating for us history nerds—that archaeologists have discovered the mortal remains of Richard III beneath a parking lot in Leicester? Think again. Plans are underway to re-inter the bones in the city’s Anglican Cathedral. Not so fast, say some: the hunchback king wasn’t a Protestant, but a Catholic, and he requires a Catholic burial. In fact, as Shakespeare fans know, Richard died at Bosworth Field (“A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!”), defending his throne from Henry Tudor. Henry went on to reign as Henry VII;...
  • Richard III dig: Facial reconstruction shows how king may have looked

    02/04/2013 5:42:27 PM PST · by beaversmom · 60 replies
    BBC ^ | 4 February 2013 | unknown
    A facial reconstruction based on the skull of Richard III has revealed how the English king may have looked. A skeleton found under a car park in Leicester has been confirmed as that of the king. The reconstructed face has a slightly arched nose and prominent chin, similar to features shown in portraits of Richard III painted after his death. Historian and author John Ashdown-Hill said seeing it was "almost like being face to face with a real person". The development comes after archaeologists from the University of Leicester confirmed the skeleton found last year was the 15th Century king's,...
  • The Scottish Play (The Olivier Way)

    02/09/2013 9:14:03 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    NPR ^ | February 07, 2013
    Laurence Olivier, whose interpretations of Shakespeare's signature roles were often considered definitive, adapted several of those roles for film. He wrote and directed widely praised versions of Hamlet, Henry V and Richard III. Olivier hoped to bring a fourth Shakespeare play to the big screen: Macbeth. The great actor and director wrote the screenplay, but couldn't raise the money to make the film. The screenplay was soon forgotten and thought lost — until recently. Jennifer Barnes, a university lecturer from the U.K., found Olivier's adaptations at the British Library. Barnes spoke with NPR's Scott Simon about her unexpected discovery, and...
  • Experts find remains of England's King Richard III

    02/04/2013 9:09:54 AM PST · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-04-2013 | Jill Lawless
    <p>He wore the English crown, but he ended up defeated, humiliated and reviled.</p> <p>Now things are looking up for King Richard III. Scientists announced Monday that they had found the monarch's 528-year-old remains under a parking lot in the city of Leicester—a discovery that will move him from a pauper's grave to a royal tomb and that fans say could potentially restore the reputation of a much-maligned king. "We could end up rewriting a little bit of history in a big way," said Lin Foxhall, head of the school of archaeology at the University of Leicester, which conducted the research. On Monday the researchers announced that tests on a battle-scarred skeleton unearthed in the central England city last year prove "beyond reasonable doubt" that it is the king, who died at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, and whose remains have been missing for centuries. "Richard III, the last Plantagenet King of England, has been found," said the university's deputy registrar, Richard Taylor, describing the find as "truly astonishing."</p>
  • Experts find remains of England's King Richard III

    02/04/2013 9:16:46 AM PST · by DJ MacWoW · 4 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Feb 4, 2013 11:13 AM (ET) | By JILL LAWLESS
    LEICESTER, England (AP) - He wore the English crown, but he ended up defeated, humiliated and reviled. Now things are looking up for King Richard III. Scientists announced Monday that they had found the monarch's 528-year-old remains under a parking lot in the city of Leicester - a discovery that will move him from a pauper's grave to a royal tomb and that fans say could potentially restore the reputation of a much-maligned king.
  • Skeleton found in parking lot identified as that of England's King Richard III, experts say

    02/04/2013 10:09:11 AM PST · by AngieGal · 65 replies
    Fox News ^ | February 04, 2013 | Fox News
    He wore the English crown, but he ended up defeated, humiliated and reviled. Now things are looking up for King Richard III. Scientists announced Monday that they had found the monarch's 500-year-old remains under a parking lot in the city of Leicester -- a discovery Richard's fans say will inspire new research into his maligned history. University of Leicester researchers say tests on a battle-scarred skeleton unearthed last year prove "beyond reasonable doubt" that it is the king, who died at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, and whose remains have been missing for centuries. "Richard III, the last...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "McLintock!"(1963)

    02/03/2013 1:35:01 PM PST · by ReformationFan · 14 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1963 | Andrew V. McLagen
    For Super Bowl Sunday, what could be a more macho alternative for those who don't have a dog in the fight so to speak than a classic western starring Hollywood's greatest he-man John Wayne? The Duke plays a tough cattle baron named George Washington "G.W." McLintock while his frequent leading lady, the lovely Maureen O'Hara plays his tempestuous red headed wife in this wild, wild west take on William Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew". Definitely not a film for the PC/socialist/feminazi crowd but quite fun for those who are pro-capitalism, pro-freedom and pro-strong male leader. It's also fun to see...
  • Is Richard III buried under a parking lot?

    01/31/2013 3:43:04 PM PST · by Squawk 8888 · 19 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | January 31, 2013 | Michael Holden
    LONDON - Archaeologists will reveal next week whether a skeleton with a cleaved skull and a curved spine entombed under a municipal parking lot is that of Richard III, the last English king to die in battle, more than five centuries ago. The grey, concrete parking lot with its red-brick walls and a payment hut in Leicester, central England, contrasts sharply with the grandeur of traditional sepulchres for English kings and queens such as Windsor Castle and Westminster Abbey. The defeated Richard’s lost grave has proved to be as elusive as the reputation of the monarch, portrayed by Shakespeare as...
  • Read Shakespeare, Wordsworth to boost brain

    01/14/2013 5:37:15 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    ANI | | Jan 14, 2013, 01.25 PM IST
    The works of Shakespeare and Wordsworth are "rocket-boosters" to the brain and better therapy than self-help books, researchers have claimed. Scientists, psychologists and English academics at Liverpool University have found that reading the works of the Bard and other classical writers has a beneficial effect on the mind, catches the reader's attention and triggers moments of self-reflection, the Telegraph reported. Using scanners, they monitored the brain activity of volunteers as they read works by William ShakespeareWilliam Wordsworth, T.S Eliot and others. They then "translated" the texts into more "straightforward", modern language and again monitored the readers' brains as they read...
  • Body of Richard III found (possibly)

    09/16/2012 10:58:10 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    Persicope Post ^ | September 13, 2012
    The background Archeologists from Leicester University have uncovered an intact skeleton which they believe is that of Richard III, the king whose reputation as a ruthless hunchback comes from William Shakespeare’s play. The skeleton has a deformed spine, and is at the site of Grey Friars church, where Richard was thought to have been buried after the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, where he was defeated by Henry Tudor. His grave is now underneath a council car park in Leicester. DNA tests will reveal whether he’s really the king or not – it’s an adult male, with spinal abnormalities that...
  • Portrait of Shakespeare Unveiled

    04/22/2009 8:44:41 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 8 replies · 930+ views
    BBC News ^ | April 22, 2009
    Portrait of Shakespeare unveiled The portrait of Shakespeare has attracted attention A portrait of William Shakespeare thought to be the only picture made of him during his lifetime has been unveiled in Warwickshire. The painting is on show at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Stratford-upon-Avon, to celebrate the playwright's birthday on 23 April. The trust said it was convinced the artwork, thought to date back to 1610, was an authentic portrait. But some critics have gone on record to say the picture is not of Shakespeare. The painting, known as the Cobbe portrait, was inherited by art restorer Alec Cobbe and...
  • Was Shakespeare A Secret Catholic? The Evidence Is Mounting…

    12/22/2009 5:56:33 PM PST · by Steelfish · 23 replies · 871+ views
    Telegraph(UK) ^ | December 22nd 2009
    Was Shakespeare A Secret Catholic? The Evidence Is Mounting… By Oliver Marre December 22nd, 2009 The Venerable English College in Rome has found documents which may suggest that Shakespeare was a secret Catholic who spent some years in the city. It’s only conjecture – but the news will certainly excite the large number of people who believe that the Bard was a Papist. Clare Asquith has written a compelling and brilliantly researched book which argues the same point from textual and historical analysis of the plays. Shadowplay is a great read for anyone interested in Shakespeare, in the religious wars...
  • William Shakespeare and Fulke Greville

    12/27/2009 3:00:15 AM PST · by crypt · 22 replies · 1,162+ views
    The Mail
    The mystery surrounding Lord Brooke Fulke Greville and William Shakespeare is creating huge interest around the World,with many people questioning if William Shakespeare really was the poet Fulke Greville or at the very least Shakespeares Master.
  • Mary Pembroke, Fulke Greville and Shakespeare

    10/14/2009 6:30:35 AM PDT · by Camden Girl · 18 replies · 580+ views
    Sunday Telegraph | 9 August 2009 | Camden Girl
    I am so excited about the plan to open Fulke Greville's tomb in St Mary's Church in Warwick. I have been a doubter about Shakespeare for years and I believe that Mary Herbert, the Countess of Pembroke was the leader of a group of writers that produced the works of Shakespeare at her beautiful home Wilton House. A lot of people, including me are so interested in this latest developement because Mary and Fulke Greville were lovers and both wrote plays about Anthony and Cleopatra. You can find out about her at http://www.marysidney.com
  • Shakespeare, Aesop, or King James? Which of the following phrases are from the K J Version? posted

    07/29/2011 7:31:14 PM PDT · by InvisibleChurch · 29 replies
    1 "There is method to my madness." 2 "Love is strong as death." 3 "In the twinkling of an eye." 4 "A plague on both your houses." 5 "Gave up the ghost." 6 "We turn not older with years, but newer every day." 7 "The wisdom of Solomon." 8 "As pure as the driven snow." 9 "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt." 10 "O ye of little faith." 11 "A cloud of witnesses." 12 "If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything." 13 "In the end,...
  • South Sudan adopts the language of Shakespeare

    10/09/2011 6:02:37 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | October 8, 2011 | Rosie Goldsmith
    The young nation of South Sudan has chosen English as its official language but after decades of civil war, the widespread learning of English presents a big challenge for a country brought up speaking a form of Arabic.I knew there might be problems as soon as I arrived at Juba International airport - and was asked to fill in my own visa form, as the immigration officer could not write English. The colourful banners and billboards hung out to celebrate South Sudan's independence back in July, and still adorning the streets now, are all in English. As are the names...
  • Learn from Shakespeare, study tells doctors

    11/25/2011 4:07:45 PM PST · by TBP · 15 replies
    AFP ^ | 24 November 2011 | Unsigned
    Doctors should read up on Shakespeare, according to an unusual medical study that says the Bard was exceptionally skilled at spotting psychosomatic symptoms. Kenneth Heaton, a doctor at the University of Bristol in western England, trawled through all 42 of Shakespeare's major works and 46 genre-matched works by contemporaries.
  • humor video-jimmy stewart, william shatner, droopy dog, Christopher Walken, etal recite Shakespeare

    02/15/2012 4:55:01 PM PST · by InvisibleChurch · 22 replies
    liveleak ^ | 2.15.12
    Impressionist does shakespeare in celebrity voices
  • Is Filing Taxes Harder than Reading Shakespeare?

    04/16/2012 9:57:09 AM PDT · by 92nina
    ATR ^ | 2012-04-12 | Hugh Johnson
    If you’re reading this, you’ve likely filed your 2011 income tax return or maybe you’re taking a break from hours spent deciphering the tax code to file an individual tax return before the April 17 deadline. Either way you’re one of the millions of Americans who are struggling to comply with a complicated tax system that wastes working hours and hard earned dollars. By both IRS and Forbes’ estimates, Americans spend billions of hours complying with federal tax law; a number that is likely higher if we include state compliance costs. The same report concluded that the average taxpayer spends...
  • I love a ballad in print alife... (Iraqi Shakespeare troupe)

    03/16/2012 12:19:40 AM PDT · by ash-housewares · 3 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 15 Mar. 2012 | Karl Kahler
    To be or not to be on a plane from Iraq to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival this midsummer -- that is the $30,000 question. Proving that the whole world truly is a stage, a Bay Area-educated English and drama professor has assembled a college troupe of Shakespearean actors in Sulaimaniyah, Iraq, that has been invited to perform at the showcase for all things Bard in Ashland, Ore. But as Oregon is many leagues from Iraq, and it costs numerous ducats to fly there, the professor is seeking the public's help to raise the money to transport 10 Iraqi Othellos, Hamlets...
  • Janet Suzman 'Mad as a Snake' Over Rylance and Shakespeare 'Myths'

    09/04/2012 12:39:06 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    Guardian | Dalya Alberge
    Janet Suzman 'mad as a snake' over Rylance and Shakespeare 'myths'
  • Shakespeare's Richard III Buried in a UK Parking Lot?

    08/26/2012 5:30:48 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    The Times of India ^ | Aug 27, 2012
    Archaeologists may have solved the puzzle of where the English king Richard III, immortalized by Shakespeare in his play is buried as they have started digging a car park in Leicester for his lost remains. The University of Leicester, Leicester City Council and the Richard III Society have joined forces to search for the grave of Richard III, thought to be under a parking lot for city council offices. The team will use ground-penetrating radar to search for the ideal spots to dig. "This archaeological work offers a golden opportunity to learn more about medieval Leicester as well as about...
  • Remains of Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre found

    06/07/2012 8:04:17 AM PDT · by onedoug · 11 replies
    boston.com via AP ^ | 6 JUNE 2012 | |Jill Lawless, Associated Press
    Archaeologists in London have discovered the remains of an Elizabethan theater where some of William Shakespeare’s plays were first performed — a venue immortalized as “this wooden O’’ in the prologue to “Henry V.’’ Experts from the Museum of London said Wednesday they had uncovered part of the gravel yard and gallery walls of the 435-year-old Curtain Theatre in Shoreditch, just east of London’s business district. The remains — of a polygonal structure, typical of 16th-century theaters — were found behind a pub on a site marked for redevelopment.
  • St. Crispin’s Day

    05/28/2012 12:16:28 PM PDT · by Ge0ffrey · 17 replies
    New York Post ^ | William Shakespeare
    Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot, But he’ll remember with advantages What feats he did that day: then shall our names Familiar in his mouth as household words Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter, Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester, Be in their flowing cups freshly remember’d, This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he today that sheds his blood with me Shall...
  • State Directed Media Sees Shakespeare’s Henry V In Obama’s Speech To His Troops

    05/03/2012 4:50:22 PM PDT · by Starman417 · 10 replies
    Flopping Aces ^ | 05-03-12 | Skookum
    Yes, the troops in Afghanistan have been inspired or at least lectured, by a vainglorious president, a man of little note and record, President Obama. In a speech hailed by Obama's most outspoken sycophant and pimp, Chris Mathews, as being reminiscent of Henry V's address to his troops on the eve of a critical battle, in which they faced almost certain annihilation at Agincourt, France. [VIDEO AT SITE] Chris Mathews, "I imagine being a soldier over there -- this is what you want to hear." It was right out of Henry V actually, a touch of Barry, in this case,...
  • Now that's bard spelling! Shoppers slam Topshop for 'Shakespere' shirt

    03/07/2012 1:28:25 PM PST · by nickcarraway
    Daily Mail ^ | 7th March 2012 | SADIE WHITELOCKS
    To be or not to be. That is normally the question. But in this case the letter 'a' appears to have caused all the problems. Clothing giant Topshop failed to spot that William Shakespeare's name was spelt incorrectly on a Ł20 T-shirt it was marketing. The women's fashion item went on sale online and at stores across the UK printed with the misspelling 'Shakespere'. Shoppers were quick to spot the blunder, and slammed Topshop and design company Tee and Cake, which produced the item, for the mistake. Shoppers were quick to spot the blunder, and slammed Topshop and design company...
  • Book review: 'Elizabeth the Queen' by Sally Bedell Smith

    01/12/2012 7:03:03 AM PST · by BigEdLB · 9 replies
    L A Times ^ | 1/12/12 | Patt Morrison
    So what is new to justify Sally Bedell Smith's massive "Elizabeth the Queen"? What is left to uncover, and what should be left uncovered and unknown in the life of this exemplary lady whose predetermined existence of regal obligation is yawningly unenviable, however bejeweled the box it comes in? (Snip) ... an American acquaintance says the queen collects pepper grinders. And sometimes it's about the queen's own words on her ancient calling in the 21st century. With characteristic briskness, she told her cousin Margaret Rhodes that her sanctified role means no retirement until death, "unless I get Alzheimer's or have...
  • Shakespeare Theatre’s ‘Much Ado’ Raises Question of Latino Stereotypes [Rice, Eggs, and Beans?]

    12/20/2011 5:14:20 PM PST · by Steelfish · 16 replies · 1+ views
    Washington Post ^ | December 19, 2011 | Peter Marks
    Shakespeare Theatre’s ‘Much Ado’ Raises Question of Latino Stereotypes By Peter Marks December 19 Reversing a decision that had enraged Latino playwrights, directors and others, the Shakespeare Theatre Company has taken the unusual step of restoring in mid-run the original names of two characters that had been changed for its Cuban-set production of “Much Ado About Nothing.” As a result, the programs for the show will be altered as of Thursday to include the names Shakespeare had given to the two minor characters, Hugh Oatcake and George Seacoal. For the first few weeks of the run, which began Nov. 25,...
  • The Greatest English Teacher

    12/07/2011 7:11:37 AM PST · by Kaslin · 22 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | December 7, 2011 | Terry Jeffrey
    The Rev. John Becker, S.J., sat at the front of the classroom, paperback in hand, glasses pushed to the end of his nose. As he spoke, he looked intently from one student to another. “This semester, I am going to teach you how to read 'King Lear,'” he said. “It may be Shakespeare’s most difficult play. But it has a powerful message to tell.” When we were done reading “Lear,” the priest promised, we would not only understand it, but we would have learned the secret of understanding any thing written in English -- anything, that is, with a meaning...
  • Doctors could learn from Shakespeare’s deep understanding of mind-body connection

    11/23/2011 7:58:28 PM PST · by decimon · 10 replies
    BMJ-British Medical Journal ^ | November 23, 2011
    Body-conscious Shakespeare: Sensory disturbances in troubled charactersShakespeare was a master at portraying profound emotional upset in the physical symptoms of his characters, and many modern day doctors would do well to study the Bard to better understand the mind-body connection, concludes an analysis of his works, published in Medical Humanities. Kenneth Heaton, a medical doctor and extensively published author on William Shakespeare's oeuvre, systematically analysed 42 of the author's major works and 46 of those of his contemporaries, looking for evidence of psychosomatic symptoms. He focused on sensory symptoms other than those relating to sight, taste, the heart, and the...
  • Classics that speak of modern frustrations

    10/23/2011 2:57:58 PM PDT · by Cardhu · 7 replies
    China Daily ^ | October 21st 2011 | Mu Qian
    The NCPA's Western classic drama series will present Moliere's The Imaginary Invalid by French theater Comedie-Francaise, and an international co-production of Shakespeare's Richard III. Mu Qian reports. Oscar-winning artists, classic plays and some of the world's most established theater groups will be featured in the Western classic drama series of the National Center for the Performing Arts (NCPA). The first two works of the series, French state theater Comedie-Francaise's performance of Moliere's The Imaginary Invalid, and an international co-production of Shakespeare's Richard III, starring Kevin Spacey, will be staged at the center from Oct 27 to Nov 13. "This will...
  • Surprising Sayings We Owe to William Shakespeare

    09/17/2011 8:57:46 PM PDT · by Mountain Bike Vomit Carnage · 66 replies
    The Stir ^ | 9-17-2011 | Jill Baughman
    As a self-proclaimed loser word nerd, my absolute favorite class in college was Shakespeare. Regardless if the dude even existed or not, I feel intimidated writing about him using my own pathetically limited vocabulary, as I am that enthralled and marveled by his English language skillz (sorry, Will). That's why I was so stoked to see the newest Tumblr hit sweeping the Internet world: "Things We Say Today Which We Owe to Shakespeare." There are so many things! I remember reading through his plays late at night for class, coming across phrases and sayings and having the light bulb in...