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Keyword: shakespeare

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  • The Life and Death of Julius Caesar

    03/15/2017 10:52:52 AM PDT · by TBP · 6 replies
    MIT ^ | circa 1599 | William Shakespeare
    ACT I SCENE I. Rome. A street. Enter FLAVIUS, MARULLUS, and certain Commoners FLAVIUS Hence! home, you idle creatures get you home: Is this a holiday? what! know you not, Being mechanical, you ought not walk Upon a labouring day without the sign Of your profession? Speak, what trade art thou? First Commoner Why, sir, a carpenter. MARULLUS Where is thy leather apron and thy rule? What dost thou with thy best apparel on? You, sir, what trade are you? Second Commoner Truly, sir, in respect of a fine workman, I am but, as you would say, a cobbler. MARULLUS...
  • Kimura’s Crazed ‘Macbeth’ for Today

    02/10/2017 2:03:10 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    THE JAPAN TIMES ^ | JAN 24, 2017 | Nobuko Tanaka
    “When I was studying English literature at the University of Tokyo, even though I had no theater experience at all, I got the chance to direct ‘Macbeth,’ ” 33-year-old Ryunosuke Kimura explained when we met recently at a rehearsal studio in downtown Tokyo. “To start my research, I rented a video of ‘Ninagawa Macbeth’ — but I was amazed because it seemed entirely different from William Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth,’ ” he recalled. Indeed it was amazingly different, because the late Yukio Ninagawa set his 1980 masterpiece in samurai-era Japan, not medieval Scotland, and he also filled most of the stage with...
  • 21 Everyday Phrases That Come Straight From Shakespeare's Plays

    12/30/2016 10:16:58 AM PST · by blam · 34 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 12-30-2016 | Elena Holodny
    Llena Holodny December 30, 2016 William Shakespeare wrote a lot of great plays, but he also coined and popularized a lot of words and phrases that we still use to this day. We put together a list of our 21 favorites. Check them out: "Puking" "The Seven Ages of Man: The Infant" by Robert Smirke, derived from a monologue in Shakespeare's "As You Like It."Wikimedia "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At...
  • Bye, Bye Bard: Penn’s ‘Snowflakes’ Ban Shakespeare

    12/15/2016 4:36:52 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 37 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | December 14, 2016 | 2:11 PM EST | Leesa K. Donner
    In the raging battle of culture wars — another one bites the dust. This time an English white male known as William Shakespeare has been removed from his prominent place at that bastion of Ivy League-ness, the University of Pennsylvania. English Department Chair Jed Esty confirmed that students removed Shakespeare’s portrait from its location in Fisher-Bennett Hall, as “a way of affirming their commitment to a more inclusive mission for the English department,” The Daily Pennsylvanian reported. […] So for whom did The Bard stand down at the University of Pennsylvania? You probably have never even heard of her. I...
  • Students rip down Shakespeare portrait at UPenn

    12/12/2016 9:54:44 AM PST · by Red Badger · 120 replies
    www.campusreform.org ^ | 12-12-16 | Anthony Gockowski
    Students at the University of Pennsylvania removed a portrait of Shakespeare from a prominent location in the school’s English department after complaining that he did not represent a diverse range of writers. The Department had previously voted to remove the painting, so students took matters into their own hands, replacing the portrait with one of an African American writer and delivering Shakespeare to the Department Chair's office. Students at the University of Pennsylvania removed a portrait of Shakespeare from a prominent location in the school’s English department after complaining that he did not represent a diverse range of writers. In...
  • Queen’s University stage production scrapped over ‘oppressive’ choice of white woman to play Othello

    11/05/2016 6:05:26 PM PDT · by Loyalist · 33 replies
    National Post ^ | November 5, 2016 | Graeme Hamilton
    A Queen’s University student theatre company has cancelled a production of Shakespeare’s Othello set to open this month following an outcry over the decision to cast a white woman in the title role of a black man. “For the safety and mental health of our entire team we unfortunately feel the need to suspend our production of Othello,” the artistic directors wrote on Facebook Wednesday. They subsequently apologized to the Kingston, Ont., university’s black community for what they called an “oppressive” artistic decision. After September auditions, Queen’s Vagabond Theatre made what its directors acknowledged was a risky decision: Lauren Broadhurst,...
  • ” O! that a man might know …”

    10/31/2016 2:37:17 PM PDT · by LeoWindhorse · 3 replies
    Sword and Shield of Hawaii ^ | Oct. 11 , 2016 | Sword and Shield of Hawaii
    O! that a man might know The end of this day’s business, ere it come; But it sufficeth that the day will end, And then the end is known. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Forever, and forever, farewell, Cassius! If we do meet again, why, we shall smile; If not, why then this parting was well made. Shakespeare – Julius Caesar – Act 5:1
  • So monkeys CAN write Shakespeare - with a little help from mind-reading technology

    09/12/2016 7:45:27 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 15 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 9/12/2016 | Libby Plummer
    It is often said that, given an infinite amount of time, monkeys hitting random keys on a typewriter will eventually type the works of Shakespeare. While it may seem far fetched, an unusual experiment has achieved the fabled task. To illustrate how paralysed people can type using a device called a ‘brain-computer interface’, scientists used monkeys to show how it can be done. Two rhesus macaque monkeys (stock picture) typed a passage from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, as well as portions of the New York Times, at 12 words per minute.
  • Deplorable Election Day

    09/10/2016 11:33:10 AM PDT · by antidisestablishment · 12 replies
    9/10/16 | self
    But if it be a sin to covet honor, I am the most offending soul alive. No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from America: Rather proclaim it, Ryan, through my host, That he which hath no stomach to this fight, Let him depart; his passport shall be made And filthy dollars for convoy put into his purse: We would not die in that man's company That fears his fellowship to die with us. This day is called the Election: He that outlives this day, and comes safe home, Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named, And...
  • Radar Scan of Shakespeare's Grave Confirms Skull Apparently Missing

    03/24/2016 10:53:29 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 52 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Mar 24, 2016
    Shakespeare's skull is likely missing from his grave, an archaeologist has concluded, confirming rumors which have swirled for years about grave-robbers and adding to the mystery surrounding the Bard's remains. Four hundred years after his death and burial at the Church of the Holy Trinity in Stratford-upon-Avon, central England, researchers were allowed to scan the grave of England's greatest playwright with ground-penetrating radar. But in the area under the church floor where the Bard's skull was expected to be, they found signs of interference.
  • Astronomers on Quixotic Quest to immortalize Cervantes With a Star

    08/28/2015 11:27:55 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    The Local ^ | 28 Aug 2015
    Some celebrities get the honour of having their own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. But a group of Spanish astronomers have something more cosmic in mind for their own literary star. literature could soon see his name written not just on paper, but also in the stars, if a group of Spanish astronomers gets their way. The Society of Spanish Astronomers, Pamplona Planetarium and Cervantes Institute have launched a campaign, calling for support to name a little-known star after Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes. The International Astronomical Union vote opened earlier this month, giving people all over the...
  • Teacher: I Don’t Teach Shakespeare Because He’s White

    06/15/2015 9:13:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 127 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 06/15/2015 | Blake Neff
    The Washington Post has published a guest article by a California teacher arguing that American high school students shouldn’t read Shakespeare because he’s a dead, white man. Dana Dusbiber, who teaches English in Sacramento, says she avoids Hamlet and all the rest because her minority students shouldn’t be expected to study a “a long-dead, British guy” (Dusbiber herself is white). And while Shakespeare is widely regarded as the premier writer of the English language, able to timelessly portray themes central to the human experience, Dusbiber says he only is regarded that way because “some white people” ordained it and he...
  • ‘Burn it:’ Emoji-fied Shakespeare for kids is worst thing ever [photo]

    06/15/2015 8:35:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 18 replies
    Twitchy ^ | June 15, 2015 | Staff
    Now is the winter of our…frowny face. There’s a new line of “books” that translate Shakespeare for kids. With emojis and text messages.
  • Presiding at Same-Sex Wedding, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Emphasizes the Word ‘Constitution’

    05/18/2015 12:19:37 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 91 replies
    New York Times ^ | 05/18/2015 | Maureen Dowd
    The groom and groom strolled down the aisle to the mellow strains of “Mr. Sandman.” Wearing her black robe with her signature white lace collar, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over the marriage on Sunday afternoon of Michael Kahn, the longtime artistic director of the Shakespeare Theater Company in Washington, and Charles Mitchem, who works at an architecture firm in New York. The gilded setting was elegant: Anderson House in the Embassy Row neighborhood, the headquarters in Washington of the Society of the Cincinnati, a club for the descendants of the French and American soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary...
  • 6 myths about the Ides of March and killing Caesar

    03/15/2015 9:55:04 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 55 replies
    Vox ^ | March 15, 2015 | Phil Edwards
    This is what most of us know about the death of Julius Caesar, half-remembered from movies and plays: Some soothsayer said, "Beware the Ides of March." A few idealistic Romans decided to win back Rome for the people.Caesar got stabbed by Brutus with a big sword, said "Et tu, Brute?" and died nobly. All of that is wrong.
  • Is there a doctor in the house? [Brian] Blessed's heart scare on stage

    01/21/2015 9:44:31 AM PST · by Timber Rattler · 10 replies
    The UK Daily Mail ^ | January 20, 2015 | QUENTIN LETTS
    Veteran actor Brian Blessed collapsed on stage with an apparent heart problem while playing King Lear. The 78-year-old had just started delivering his lines at the start of the Shakespearean tragedy when he fainted, toppled off a raised platform and fell heavily, his crown rolling to a halt at the front of the stage. Fellow actor Noel White, playing the Earl of Kent, announced quietly: ‘Ladies and gentlemen, this is not part of the play. Is there a doctor in the house?’ Indeed there was. A barely conscious Mr Blessed, flat on his back and surrounded by worried cast members...
  • Egyptian Political Scientist: Jews Must Return the Gold They Stole from Egypt during the Exodus

    08/31/2014 12:34:12 PM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 94 replies
    MEMRI TV ^ | July 8, 2014 | Channel 1 (Egypt)
    In a July 8, 2014 interview with Egypt's Channel 1, Egyptian political scientist Ammar Ali Hassan said that the Jews had stolen Egypt's gold and treasures when they left ancient Egypt. The character of Shakespeare's Shylock is "a replica of the Jew who lived in Egypt – a merchant and a loan shark," he said, adding: "We demand that they return the treasures they stole from us." Following are excerpts: Ammar Ali Hassan: The Jews wanted [Egypt] to pay them compensation to the tune of dozens of billions of dollars, although our economy is very hard off. More importantly, they...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Shakespeare's Bloody Problem: Why the Tragedies Almost Never Work Anymore

    06/20/2014 12:35:52 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    One character, his torso already relieved of arms and legs, is tossed onto the barbecue. Another’s hands and tongue are severed to keep her from reporting a crime. (She’s then stabbed to death anyway.) Two more characters are beheaded; one behanded; one hanged. For those who like their violence more ironic, there’s this happy couple: the man left buried up to his neck to starve, the woman fed a pie made from the minced remains of her sons. The meal may give her heartburn, but it’s the subsequent stabbing that kills her. A Game of Thrones episode? No, it’s Titus...
  • Why is Shakespeare so mysterious? Because he was a Catholic in an age of vicious persecution

    04/23/2014 8:09:57 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 10 replies
    http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/ ^ | April 23, 2014 | Joseph Pearce
    Today is St George’s Day. It is also Shakespeare’s birthday and, believe it or not, it is the day on which Shakespeare died. Apart from the astonishing coincidence that Shakespeare died on his own birthday, it is also singularly appropriate that England’s greatest poet should have been born and should have died on the feast day of her patron saint. It seems appropriate, therefore, that we should celebrate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birthday with a reference to cricket, that most quintessential of all English sports. Shakespeare is “450, Not Out”, continuing to hit his audiences for six after reaching...