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Keyword: shipwrecks

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  • Did the ROMANS discover America? Radical theory claims sword found on Oak Island suggests....

    12/19/2015 12:11:17 AM PST · by wille777 · 68 replies
    Researchers, led by Jovan Hutton Pulitzer, claim they have evidence that Roman ships visited North America 'during the first century or earlier.' Their theory centers on the discovery of what they believe to be a Roman sword on Oak Island, off Nova Scotia.
  • 22 Shipwrecks Found in Single Location in Greece

    10/29/2015 3:22:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, October 28, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Hailed as one of the top archaeological finds of 2015, the discovery was made by a joint Greek-American archaeological expedition in the small Fourni archipelago with an area of just 17 square miles. This is a collection of 13 islands and islets located between the eastern Aegean islands of Samos and Icaria. "Surpassing all expectations, over only 13 days we added 12 percent to the total of known ancient shipwrecks in Greek territorial waters," Peter Campbell, of the University of Southampton and co-director from US based RPM Nautical Foundation, told Discovery News. Fourni lies right in the middle of the...
  • Lake Michigan is So Clear Right Now its Shipwrecks Are Visible From the Air

    05/03/2015 12:59:34 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 83 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-3-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    Though the past winter was the hottest on record, it was chilly enough on the East Coast to send seasonal sheets of ice creeping across the Great Lakes. Now that that ice has cleared with spring, Lake Michigan is clear enough that shipwrecks lying on the lake bottom can be seen from the air. The U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City noted the crystal clear water conditions and the lost ships during a routine patrol. Last week, they posted a handful of pictures to their Facebook page. The images come from the area near Sleeping Bear Point known...
  • New York City's harbors house 1,600 bars of silver, and 4-foot-long, wood-eating worms

    07/01/2009 6:58:24 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 16 replies · 2,168+ views ^ | Sun Jun 28 | Chuck Shepherd –
    Using GPS and state-of-the-art sonar, Columbia University researchers recently made the first comprehensive map of the wonders submerged in New York City's harbors. Supplementing those findings with historical data, New York magazine reported the inventory's highlights in May: a 350-foot steamship (downed in 1920), a freight train (derailed in 1865), 1,600 bars of silver (unrecovered since 1903), a fleet of Good Humor ice cream trucks (which form a reef for aquatic life), and so many junked cars near the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges that divers use them as underwater navigation points. Of most concern lately, though, are the wildlife: 4-foot-long...
  • WWII ‘Battle of the Atlantic’ Shipwrecks Discovered Off North Carolina

    10/28/2014 6:00:24 AM PDT · by artichokegrower · 15 replies
    gCaptain ^ | October 21, 2014
    A team of researchers led by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant shipwrecks from World War II’s legendary “Battle of the Atlantic” just off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter it sank, named Bluefields, were found just a few hundred yards apart from each other approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina, according to NOAA.
  • Historic 'Ghost Ships' Discovered Near Golden Gate Bridge

    09/18/2014 9:22:35 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Megan Gannon
    The waters just west of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge hide a graveyard of sunken ships. By some estimates, there are 300 wrecks in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area alone. But only a fraction of them have been seen by scientists. Marine archaeologists and researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have set out to document those lost vessels. Over the course of a five-day survey that just ended yesterday (Sept. 15), the team discovered the sites of at least four wrecks: the 1910 SS Selja shipwreck, the...
  • World’s biggest shipwreck

    09/19/2013 10:11:51 AM PDT · by juliosevero · 33 replies
    Last Days Watchman ^ | Julio Severo
    World’s biggest shipwreck The sinking of Titanic and Wilhelm Gustloff in perspective By Julio Severo Even with their sophisticated, fast and high-powered news and information technology, modern humankind has a hard time to see or recognize proven facts. One of those facts is that it is impossible to live without God and his values. Nazis tried, and they reaped bitter and destructive consequences. Communists tried, and they did and they do the same reaping. Both socialist ideologies were focused on man and based on the evolution theory, which dethrones God and enthrones man, or monkey. Without God, tragedy is...
  • Explorers of 19th century shipwreck in Gulf of Mexico find 2 others with mysterious pasts

    07/27/2013 6:45:40 AM PDT · by BBell · 12 replies
    GALVESTON, Texas -- Marine archaeologists made a thrilling discovery this week while examining a well-preserved shipwreck deep in the Gulf of Mexico -- two other sunken vessels that likely went down with it during an early 19th century storm.
  • Rust In Pieces: Poignant pictures capture tragic beauty of world's most haunting shipwrecks

    01/19/2013 9:25:13 AM PST · by Uncle Chip · 27 replies
    The Daily Mail Online ^ | January 19, 2013 | Daily Mail Reporter
    The history of humanity is filled with stories of tragic naval catastrophes that took a heavy tool in both blood and treasure, leaving behind only wooden or steel carcasses exposed to the elements. According to a United Nations report, there are more than three million shipwrecks on the ocean floor alone, most of which will forever remain out of view to rust away and be consumed by living organisms. However, the fate of other remnants of shipwrecks is different. Those ill-fated vessels that ended up grounded or sank close to shore may yet be explored, cataloged and photographed, sharing their...
  • Titanic mystery over violin 'from band leader who played on'

    01/31/2012 9:16:40 AM PST · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 113 replies · 2+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 1-31-12
    An auctioneer has hired experts to try to verify claims by the owner of the century old instrument that it belonged to Wallace Hartley, the leader of the vessel’s eight-man musical ensemble. If proved, it could become the most valuable Titanic artefact ever to be considered for auction. But the claim is being treated with caution as a result. Hartley and his fellow musicians earned legendary status for their decision to play on as the ship sank on its maiden voyage on April 15, 1912. They are said to have played the hymn “Nearer My God to Thee” after the...
  • UNHCR: Witnesses say ship with 600 sunk near Libya

    05/09/2011 9:15:08 AM PDT · by Pan_Yan · 14 replies
    AP via Google ^ | May 9, 2011 | Frank Jordans - Geneva, Slobodan Lekic - Brussels.
    MILAN (AP) — A ship carrying up to 600 migrants trying to flee Libya has sunk just off the coast of the North African country, the U.N. Refugee Agency said Monday, citing witness accounts. The agency is trying to confirm what happened to the passengers when the vessel broke apart at sea shortly after leaving a port near Libya's capital Tripoli on Friday, spokeswoman Laura Boldrini said. There was no information on how many people might have died, and the uprising in Libya makes any official accounting unlikely. Witnesses who departed on another boat shortly after reported seeing the ship...
  • Hints of yeast, honey; shipwrecked bubbly uncorked

    11/17/2010 8:11:49 AM PST · by ConservativeStatement · 15 replies · 1+ views
    AP ^ | November 17, 2010 | LOUISE NORDSTROM
    MARIEHAMN, Finland – An accent of mushrooms merged with sweet notes of honey in a sampling Wednesday of what's been billed as the world's oldest champagne, salvaged from a shipwreck in the Baltic Sea. An expert who tasted the vintage bubbly was lyrical, detecting hints of chanterelles and linden blossom. An Associated Press reporter, who also sampled a bottle, found only a slight fizz and flavors of yeast and honey. The champagne — of the brands Veuve Clicquot and the now defunct Juglar — was recovered from a shipwreck discovered in July near the Aland Islands, between Sweden and Finland....
  • Vast and Deadly Fleets May Yield Secrets at Last (Freedom Over Tyranny Alert)

    04/20/2004 8:06:37 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 34 replies · 489+ views
    New York Times ^ | April 20, 2004 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    The Persian Wars may be famed in history, but few artifacts and material remains have emerged to shed light on how the ancient Greeks defeated the Asian invaders and saved Europe in what scholars call one of the first great victories of freedom over tyranny. It is well known that a deadly warship of antiquity, the trireme, a fast galley powered by three banks of rowers pulling up to 200 oars, played a crucial role in the fierce battles. Its bronze ram could smash enemy ships, and armed soldiers could leap aboard a foe's vessel in hand-to-hand combat with swords...
  • Wreck of first US ship sunk in WWII revealed: researchers

    04/03/2009 4:41:28 AM PDT · by zaphod3000 · 21 replies · 1,201+ views
    AFP/Google ^ | April 1, 2009 | N/A
    The wreck of the first US ship sunk during World War II has been revealed in detail for the first time on the seabed off southeastern Australia, researchers said Wednesday. Images of the merchant vessel City of Rayville, which was sunk in 1940 by a German mine, were taken by state-of-the-art sonar technology and remotely operated vehicles, Deakin University scientists said. The 6,000-tonne City of Rayville was carrying a cargo of lead, wool and copper from South Australia to New York via Melbourne when it struck a mine in a newly-laid German minefield in the Bass Strait on November 8,...
  • Great Britain: Thames reveals forgotten wrecks ( 7 shipwrecks discovered, up to 350 years old)

    08/26/2008 10:12:31 PM PDT · by Stoat · 21 replies · 1,372+ views
    Thames reveals forgotten wrecksMark Blunden 26.08.08   The largest-ever post-war salvage operation on the Thames has discovered seven shipwrecks up to 350 years old. They include a warship that was blown up in 1665, a yacht converted to a Second World War gunboat, and a mystery wreck in which divers found a personalised gin bottle. The vessels, in the Thames Estuary, are just some of about 1,100 ships which went down in the whole of the river. The salvage by Wessex Archaeology and the Port of London Authority, which regulates the river, was both historical and practical. Jagged metal...
  • Captain Kidd Ship Found

    12/13/2007 10:43:49 AM PST · by SpringheelJack · 95 replies · 437+ views
    Yahoo ^ | Dec. 13, 2007 | LiveScience Staff
    The wreckage of a pirate ship abandoned by Captain Kidd in the 17th century has been found by divers in shallow waters off the Dominican Republic, a research team claims. The underwater archaeology team, from Indiana University, says they have found the remains of Quedagh Merchant, actively sought by treasure hunters for years. Charles Beeker of IU said his team has been licensed to study the wreckage and convert the site into an underwater preserve for the public. It is remarkable that the wreck has remained undiscovered all these years given its location, just 70 feet off the coast of...
  • Titanic explorer to seek shipwrecks in Aegean: Greek officials

    06/09/2006 2:23:58 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 19 replies · 624+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | 6/8/06 | AFP
    The explorer who discovered the Titanic's resting place is to undertake a search for ancient shipwrecks off the southern Greek island of Crete, the Greek foreign ministry said Thursday. The search, by American oceanographer Robert Ballard, will be conducted in international waters, with the Greek culture ministry hoping to send a representative to observe operations, a ministry official said. "Deep-sea research will be conducted in the area between Santorini and Crete, for the purpose of locating (ancient) Mediterranean sea trade routes, recording ancient shipwrecks etc," culture ministry general secretary Christos Zahopoulos told a news conference this week. "The necessary steps...
  • Divers get cultural signposts

    10/27/2005 4:34:17 AM PDT · by Kurt_Hectic · 2 replies · 233+ views ^ | 27 Oct 2005, 12:57 | Cato Guhnfeldt, Translator: Jonathan Tisdall
    Norway's Directorate for Cultural Heritage has begun a unique program of setting up signs to highlight historical landmarks - underwater. About 30 shipwrecks in southern Norway will get the familiar preservation sign from the directorate, to help divers appreciate - and respect - some of the country's less obvious attractions. On Thursday the first sign, bearing the familiar pretzel-shaped landmark logo, will go up near a shipwreck in Vest-Agder County in southern Norway. The signs are built of acid-resistant steel and titanium to resist saltwater and other sea problems. Signs will be placed at depths of 10-30 meters (33-98 feet),...
  • Three shipwrecks located in the Great Lakes including S.S. Michigan

    07/12/2005 10:32:15 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 40 replies · 2,480+ views
    Niles Daily Star ^ | Monday, July 11, 2005 | Monday, July 11, 2005
    HOLLAND - A recent expedition by Holland-based Michigan Shipwreck Research Associates has led to the discovery of the final location of the Great Lakes passenger steamer S.S. Michigan, the remains of the car ferry Ann Arbor 5 and an unnamed barge. The S.S. Michigan is one of MSRA's six most-sought-after shipwrecks and is the subject of a 2004 documentary called, "ICEBOUND! The Ordeal of the S.S. Michigan." The S.S. Michigan sank on March 19, 1885, just four years after her launch. The 30-man crew made it safely to shore after being stranded on the ice for 42 days. MSRA board...
  • 1421 (Chinese discovery of America)

    01/01/2004 4:48:30 PM PST · by SteveH · 19 replies · 497+ views
    Hello, I am wondering if anyone out there has read "1421" yet. I read it over the holidays and found it about 80% believable. In reading some of the other reviews on Amazon, it seemed that some skeptical readers blew it off due to a small set of fanciful conjectures that appeared relatively early in the book. Any other reviews?
  • Ancient Cannonballs Come to Life with a Bang

    05/10/2002 2:20:39 AM PDT · by 2Trievers · 5 replies · 410+ views
    Reuters ^ | May 10 2002
    LONDON (Reuters) - Cannon balls retrieved from ancient shipwrecks are wreaking thunderous havoc centuries later -- by exploding on the desks of archaeologists, New Scientist magazine said Wednesday. Robert Child, of the National Museums and Galleries of Wales in Cardiff, told the magazine that he had recorded several instances where the old rusted balls of metal started to heat up and turn red, or explode after being exposed to oxygen. In one case, a ball retrieved from a 1691 wreck heated up to a few hundred degrees after several minutes in the open air, began to glow a dull red...
  • An Angler's Nightmare

    05/05/2002 8:50:24 PM PDT · by WaterDragon · 4 replies · 243+ views
    Oregon Magazine ^ | May 1, 2002 | Fred Delkin
    OMED: A wilderness odyssey in which the protagonists are men of stout demeanor paired with boyish enthusiasm for piscatorial pursuits; and subsequent to an incautious decision to set forth on an ill-conceived essay for genus salmo giganticus get the bird (twice!) and go straight to the dogs. The only flaw in the lugubrious narrative concerning the peripathetic photographers to which you are about to be exposed is that Fred did not write the tale under the pseudonym, Prince Rupert; for no man alive is more like unto a pirate, nor better displays in pantaloons. It was an opportunity to join...