Keyword: sight

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  • Contact Lenses

    12/17/2014 5:24:38 PM PST · by Ghost of SVR4 · 19 replies
    Today | Me
    Just curious where other freepers get their contact lenses online? My tow kids are now both sporting contacts and I am looking for reputable sites that will deliver to my home for the best price. Can anyone lend their experience?
  • Reading is Easy (Illiteracy is hard)

    01/09/2013 6:20:26 PM PST · by arthurus · 15 replies
    Right Side News ^ | 08 January 201 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    ...endless shock waves of intellectual disorientation. Here is jargon concocted by our elite experts during this long national nightmare: psycholinguistics, miscue analysis, reading strategies, comprehension strategies, whole word, guessing, picture reading, whole language, sight words, balanced literacy, reading readiness, word walls, active learning practices, closed instructional activities, high-frequency words, thinking and learning about print, invented spelling, reading recovery, emergent literacy, creative curriculum approach, functional systemic linguistic theory, rich literacy activities, authoring cycle, capability beliefs, post-reading, lifelong reader, cognitive flexibility theory, independent reading, kid watching. The drift of all this malarkey is that reading is a very difficult thing to do.
  • There's No End in Sight to Minn. Foreclosure Mess

    01/21/2011 10:22:26 AM PST · by Son House · 19 replies · 1+ views
    StarTribune ^ | January 20, 2011 | JENNIFER BJORHUS and JIM BUCHTA
    More than 70,000 Minnesota homeowners were behind on their mortgages and received pre-foreclosure notices last year, a warning that the housing market still faces serious hurdles in 2011. About 71,665 struggling homeowners got the notices in 2010, up 8 percent from 2009, according to the Minnesota Home Ownership Center, which released the numbers Thursday. The number of notices rose 3 percent in the Twin Cities metro area, but 15 percent elsewhere in Minnesota. The numbers suggest that despite glimmers of hope in the job market, the state could see more people lose homes this year than they did last year,...
  • Troops fund Iraqi baby's gift of sight

    12/12/2009 6:08:04 PM PST · by SandRat · 11 replies · 793+ views
    Multinational Force Iraq ^ | Spc. Ruth McClary, USA
    First Lt. Jason Hickman, of Greenville, W.Va., proudly holds Noor Hassam Oudah during a celebration in her honor, Dec. 9. The one-year-old, known as "Baby Nourah," was born blind with congenital cataracts. Hickman spearheaded a campaign, raising over $5,000 for her surgery through donations from Soldiers of the 150th Armored Reconnaissance Squadron, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, and their families and friends. Baby Nourah received surgery through the Khalidi Medical Center in Amman, Jordan, Nov. 15, three days after her first birthday. Photo by Spc. Ruth McClary, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team. BAGHDAD — One-year-old Noor Hassam Oudah, known as...
  • Health Care And The 5 Senses

    11/13/2009 8:28:40 AM PST · by Patriot1259 · 148+ views
    TheCypressTimes.com ^ | 11/13/2009 | Mark Roberts
    Medical Columnist Mark Roberts look at our five senses, how they work and their importance...."What's that smell?"
  • Blind Woman Regains Site When Doctors Implant Tooth in Her Eye

    09/16/2009 6:30:20 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 20 replies · 1,244+ views
    WTVJ-TV ^ | Sept. 16, 2009
    "They're going to put it where?"
  • Adult Stem cell patch restores vision

    04/18/2007 4:39:08 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 17 replies · 2,166+ views
    LifeSiteNews ^ | 4/18/07 | LifeSiteNews
    MELBOURNE, April 18, 2007 (LifeSiteNews.com) - A man's vision has been restored by a corneal patch grown from adult stem cells by a team at the University of Melbourne's Centre for Eye Research Australia (CERA) and the Bernard O'Brien Institute of Microsurgery (BOBIM). The patch, which replicates the cornea, was cultivated from a single stem cell from a donor eye and was transplanted to the surface of the man's eyes. The research team was led by Dr Mark Daniell (CERA) and Dr Erik Thompson (BOBIM). The process, known as a limbal stem cell transplant, is thought to be the first...
  • Bright Lights, Not-So-Big Pupils

    01/01/2009 12:24:34 PM PST · by CE2949BB · 3 replies · 259+ views
    Phys Org ^ | December 31st, 2008
    A team of Johns Hopkins neuroscientists has worked out how some newly discovered light sensors in the eye detect light and communicate with the brain. The report appears online this week in Nature. These light sensors are a small number of nerve cells in the retina that contain melanopsin molecules. Unlike conventional light-sensing cells in the retina—rods and cones—melanopsin-containing cells are not used for seeing images; instead, they monitor light levels to adjust the body's clock and control constriction of the pupils in the eye, among other functions.
  • Researchers' vision: restoring sight through artificial retinas

    12/31/2008 11:05:46 AM PST · by CE2949BB · 4 replies · 361+ views
    McClatchy ^ | December 29, 2008 | Robert S. Boyd
    WASHINGTON — Scientists are testing artificial retinas that they hope can restore partial sight to people who've lost their vision to the most common causes of blindness.
  • Reliance Life readies stem cell therapies

    07/01/2008 6:54:28 PM PDT · by Coleus · 144+ views
    live mint ^ | 07.01.08
    Mumbai: Seven years after its inception amid much fanfare, Reliance Life Sciences, or RLS, is finally rolling out stem cell-based therapies in India, beginning with a treatment that can restore or improve vision. “This is the first commercial stem cell treatment in ophthalmology in the country,” said K.V. Subramaniam, CEO and president, RLS, part of the Mukesh Ambani-led Reliance group. The company, which has invested around Rs1,000 crore in the business, has lined up other stem cell therapies for cardiac infarction, diabetic ulcer, and stable vitiligo or leukoderma (a skin disease), among others, to be offered in clinics in the...
  • Stem cell transplants cure blindness; Lifestyle can activate healthy gene activity

    06/29/2008 4:58:24 PM PDT · by Coleus · 3 replies · 226+ views
    iZumi Bio has agreed to license some patents from the J. David Gladstone Institutes as they begin to work together on new adult stem cell technology involved in devising cardiovascular therapies. ReportStem cell transplants were used to restore the sight of six blind patients at a London hospital. StorySome 2,500 delegates attended the recent International Society for Stem Cell Research in Philadelphia. And insiders say that the development of induced pluripotent stem cells has clearly energized the entire field. ReleaseIn a new study regarding age-related diseases, researchers identified two key regulatory pathways that control how well adult stem cells...
  • Therapy in China gives blind Ark. girl some sight

    06/14/2008 7:46:06 AM PDT · by Dr. Marten · 34 replies · 175+ views
    The Cabin ^ | JOANNE BRATTON
    MOUNTAIN HOME, Ark. — When 9-year-old Kacie Sallee saw her father's face more clearly for the first time in her life, she had a question. "She said, 'Is that what he looks like?'" said her mother, Marinda Sallee. Kacie, who is blind, returned last week from China, where she received umbilical-cord stem cell treatment in hopes of improving her eyesight. The nearly four-week trip and medical treatment was paid through $60,000 in local donations. Kacie was born with septo-optic dysplasia, an underdevelopment of the optic nerve and pituitary gland. She could see bright colors out of her right eye but...
  • Pfizer to invest in adult stem-cell treatment for eyes

    06/27/2008 9:01:08 PM PDT · by Coleus · 4 replies · 260+ views
    cna ^ | 06.25.08
    The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer has announced that it is funding a new adult stem-cell treatment that could treat diabetes-induced retinal damage, a leading cause of blindness. Forbes Magazine says that Pfizer is funding the creation of a San Diego biotech company named EyeCyte to develop stem-cell treatments for eye diseases. The company will base its work upon Scripps Research Institute ophthalmologist Martin Friedlander’s research involving stem-cells from blood and bone marrow. EyeCyte will receive about $3 million from Pfizer, which in return has the right of first refusal regarding the new company’s products. In animal experiments, adult stem-cells have shown...
  • Phila. researchers bring sight to blind

    04/27/2008 4:40:53 PM PDT · by NittanyLion · 4 replies · 112+ views
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | April 27, 2008 | Tom Avril
    The patient was blind. Maguire's hair-thin needle traveled through the "white" of his eye, all the way back to his badly scarred retina, where it would deliver billions of genetically modified viruses. Each virus carried a single gene: the recipe to produce a crucial enzyme that his eye was unable to make on its own. Within weeks, beyond what anyone had predicted, the experiment worked. The young man and two other patients began to regain some vision. The results, reported online today by the New England Journal of Medicine, represent a dramatic advance in the field known as gene therapy,...
  • Hurler regains sight after 'miracle' diet supplement (macular degeneration)

    02/13/2008 10:59:53 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 64 replies · 1,055+ views
    Former Cork club hurler Jimmy Aherne wept when he was told he would be blind within three years. The father-of-four -- who is a second cousin to hurling legend Christy Ring -- was diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The condition is cruel, as it has traditionally been untreatable. For decades, thousands of pensioners who lost their sight were simply told they had "old people's blindness" and that nothing could be done for them. But today, almost 12 months after that shocking diagnosis, the deterioration in Jimmy's eyesight has been halted and his good eye has improved to the point...
  • Bone marrow stem cells differentiated, produced keratocan in mouse study

    05/23/2007 7:16:24 PM PDT · by Coleus · 155+ views
    OSN ^ | 05.23.07
    Stem cells derived from bone marrow and intrastromally injected into the corneas of mice can differentiate into keratocan-producing cells, according to an experimental study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati. Winston Whei-Yang Kao, PhD, and colleagues investigated whether bone marrow stem cells could differentiate into cells that expressed keratocan, a characteristic of corneal keratocytes. The study involved Kera-/- mice. Hongshan Liu, PhD, a research scientist in the university's ophthalmology department, presented their findings at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology meeting. The researchers found that, after 1 week, the abnormal corneas of animals injected with the stem...
  • Bone Marrow Stem Cells May Cure Eye Disease

    05/10/2007 6:04:40 PM PDT · by Coleus · 2 replies · 177+ views
    Cincinnati - Adult bone marrow stem cells may help cure certain genetic eye diseases, according to UC researchers. Scientists have completed a study using mice which showed that bone marrow stem cells can switch roles and produce keratocan, a natural protein involved in the growth of the cornea—the transparent, outer layer of the eyeball. This ability of marrow cells to “differentiate” into keratocan-producing cells might provide a means for treating abnormal corneal cell growth in people. Winston Whei-Yang Kao, PhD, professor of ophthalmology, and Hongshan Liu, PhD, research scientist in the department of ophthalmology, will present their findings at the...
  • You People [Zot] Me!

    02/23/2007 2:03:09 PM PST · by Dallas_Man · 195 replies · 3,185+ views
    2/23/2007 | Dallas_Man
    I've read enough of the posts on this sight to know that most of you people are really dangerous. If someone disagrees with you, you would "Take them out" if you could. It's that "Ultra-conservative, All American Redneck, NASCAR, Pro-Wrestling, inbread country music fan" kind of politics that tries to shut down anyone who speaks their mind against your beliefs that bothers me. I am in favor of gun ownership and the right to bare arms, and it's people like you that I need to protect myself from. This probably won't get posted for the reasons listed above, but even...
  • 'Bionic' eye implants look ahead

    02/16/2007 3:23:11 AM PST · by Jedi Master Pikachu · 48 replies · 2,913+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, February 16, 2007 | Jonathan Fildes
    A bionic eye implant that could help restore the sight of millions of blind people could be available to patients within two years. US researchers have been given the go-ahead to implant the prototype device in 50 to 75 patients. The Argus II system uses a spectacle-mounted camera to feed visual information to electrodes in the eye. Patients who tested less-advanced versions of the retinal implant were able to see light, shapes and movement. "What we are trying to do is take real-time images from a camera and convert them into tiny electrical pulses that would jump-start the otherwise...
  • Now, vision possible with ADULT stem cells

    11/13/2006 9:28:13 PM PST · by Coleus · 18 replies · 590+ views
    Indian Express Newspapers ^ | 11.12.06 | Khushboo Sandhu
    “After every Diwali, a large number people are blinded while bursting fire crackers. There are others who suffer from blindness due to chemical burns. But there is a ray of hope for such patients,” said Dr Radhika Tandon, Additional Professor, Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) at the national symposium on stem cells being held at Panjab University. “Standard corneal transplant does not work in cases where blindness is due to chemical burning. But stem cell transplant can prove to be effective,” she said, adding that stem cell transplants do not ensure a perfect vision, but the patient...
  • Critical Care Teams Work to Save Marine’s Sight

    10/31/2006 4:24:43 PM PST · by SandRat · 7 replies · 307+ views
    Defend America News ^ | Maj. Ann P. Knabe
    BAGHDAD, Iraq, Oct. 31, 2006 — It was a terrible scenario. A suicide bomber attack in Fallujah, Iraq, had injured a 21-year-old Marine. He suffered multiple burns to his face and hands, and blast injuries to his right arm with shrapnel embedded in his leg. But the worst part was shrapnel in his right eye, causing bleeding and a chance of retinal detachment, which would mean loss of sight. The Marine was flown to Balad Air Base, where an Air Force theater hospital ophthalmologist determined the burns and complex retinal damage were best treated in the United States. “It only...
  • Real Miracle: Blind Woman Regains Her Sight After Heart Attack

    01/20/2006 8:32:02 AM PST · by van_erwin · 65 replies · 1,522+ views
    Telegraph ^ | January 20, 2006 | Nick Britten
    A woman who had been blind for 25 years awoke in hospital after suffering a heart attack and found that she could see again.Since 1979, Joyce Urch had lived in a world of shadows and near-darkness, but was astonished to find her sight restored when she came round after being resuscitated.   Mr and Mrs Urch, fresh from celebrating their golden wedding anniversary Doctors have been unable to explain what happened, but Mrs Urch, 74, was happy yesterday to put it down to a "miracle".She said: "When I first came round I just opened my eyes and shouted, 'I can...
  • SMOKERS TWICE AS LIKELY TO GO BLIND

    PEOPLE who smoke are twice as likely to go blind as those who don't, a report warned yesterday. Experts believe around 54,000 smokers have developed a condition called age-related macular degeneration (AMD) as a result of their habit. This is the leading cause of blindness in the UK, with around 500,000 sufferers. The AMD Alliance UK said yesterday the link between smoking and blindness was as strong as that between cigarettes and lung cancer. Yet only a tiny number of the UK's 13 million smokers are aware of the risk. A survey of 1,000 people found that only seven per...
  • Summit in Sight for Mars Rover Spirit (Husband Hill)

    08/17/2005 10:20:24 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 9 replies · 473+ views
    Space.com ^ | 8/17/05 | Leonard Davis
    At its Gusev crater exploration site, the Spirit Mars rover is wheeling to the summit of Husband Hill and likely to complete its climb this week. "I think we’re going to make it," said the Mars Exploration Rover program’s lead scientist, Steve Squyres of Cornell University. New imagery from the robot shows a feature that is either the summit or something very close to it, he noted in a newly issued rover update on a Cornell University-based website. Spirit has wrapped up work in what’s called the Voltaire region, including a thorough sweep of a rock called "Assemblee" using science...
  • Stem cells used to restore vision

    05/02/2005 9:45:13 PM PDT · by Founding Father · 51 replies · 1,216+ views
    BBC News ^ | April 28, 2005
    Stem cells used to restore vision A hospital in West Sussex is pioneering the use of stem cells to restore the eyesight of patients. The trial, being carried out at the Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, has already helped 40 people see again. The surgery at the hospital has been developed over the past five years. Stem cells from the patient or a donor are used to redevelop the cornea, the transparent film at the front of the eye which lets in light. Opthalmic surgeon Sheraz Daya said: "Many people who've had injuries to their eyes, or even people born...
  • Six previously blind patients detect light, motion, identify objects with retinal prostheses

    05/02/2005 5:38:37 PM PDT · by Mike Fieschko · 1 replies · 269+ views
    USC researchers present information on 'artificial retina' May 2 at ARVO 2005 FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (ARVO 2005 Annual Meeting) - Researchers from the University of Southern California and the Doheny Eye Institute's Doheny Retina Institute will be presenting data on the first six patients implanted with an intraocular retinal prosthesis-more popularly referred to as an artificial retina-developed and manufactured in partnership with Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., of Sylmar, Calif. According to Mark Humayun, professor of ophthalmology at the Keck School of Medicine and the lead investigator on the project, all six of the previously blind patients have been able...
  • Scientists Interrupt Search for the “Mayan Atlantis" in the Caribbean.

    03/30/2005 2:16:20 PM PST · by vannrox · 24 replies · 3,740+ views
    Cuban Newpaper: GRANMA ^ | November 2004 / FR Post 3-30-05 | Editorial Staff
    Scientists Interrupt Search for the “Mayan Atlantis" in the Caribbean. Cuban Newpaper: GRANMA Mexico City, November 6, 2004 Forwarded by David Drewelow This story updates this prior story . - A group of scientists searching for a hypothetical “Mayan Atlantis" found a pyramid of 35 meters under the waters of the Caribbean, but it had to interrupt the mission due to technical problems, as reported by the Mexican newspaper Millenium, today. After 25 days of work in the sea, near the southwestern end of Cuba, the investigations deeper than 500 meters had to be abandoned due to problems with the...
  • Legally blind man rediscovers wonder of sight

    02/13/2005 8:34:47 AM PST · by Radix · 11 replies · 649+ views
    Brockton Enterprise ^ | 13 February 2005 | Jennifer Kovalich
     BROCKTON — Reclining in his black wheelchair Friday in his room at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Stephen Zardis gazed up at the tiled ceiling. He had never noticed the electrical sockets there before. That is because until about three months ago, Zardis had not been able to see them, or for that matter, anything or anyone at all in fine detail. "Before this I had to rely on my auditory abilities to pick up identifications," Zardis said. "I was like in a very small cocoon." Now he is like a butterfly winging about, drinking in the world thanks to a...
  • The Claim: Wearing Glasses Can Weaken Your Eyes

    01/25/2005 10:13:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 98 replies · 5,034+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 25, 2005 | ANAHAD O'CONNOR
    REALLY? THE FACTS Glasses can bring a blurry world into focus, but some people suspect that by doing all the heavy lifting the glasses may speed the natural decline of vision. But ophthalmologists say this is an illusion. How well a person can see is largely determined by the size of the eyeball, something a pair of glasses cannot change. The average eye is about an inch from the cornea, in the front, to the retina, in the back. When the eyes are either too large (shortsightedness) or too small (farsightedness), the cornea cannot properly focus images on the retina,...
  • Navy Keeps Secret in Sight

    11/26/2004 2:13:33 PM PST · by crushelits · 20 replies · 1,813+ views
    washingtonpost.com ^ | Friday, November 26, 2004 | Spencer S. Hsu
    Navy Keeps A Secret in Plain Sight Shortly after dawn on a recent morning, two dump trucks and a water tanker pulled up to a new, unmarked complex of buildings at East Potomac Park, the grassy peninsula near the Jefferson Memorial. The drivers exited their cabs, knocked at a gatehouse with blacked-out windows and waited for a security guard to emerge from behind a locked door. A few minutes later, a panel of 10-foot-high security fence slid open, and the trucks disappeared inside, leaving the joggers and cyclists along the waterfront none the wiser about their mission. What goes on...
  • Heavy computer use tied to glaucoma

    11/15/2004 7:11:56 PM PST · by NCjim · 27 replies · 1,037+ views
    CBC News ^ | November 15, 2004
    Men who spend hours staring at a computer screen may be at increased risk for glaucoma, a disease that can cause blindness, Japanese doctors say. Researchers studied more than 10,200 workers with an average age of 43 for signs of glaucoma, a gradual disease of the optic nerve leading to loss of peripheral vision. The workers were randomly selected for testing at their medical check-up. Participants filled out questionnaires about their eye health and use of computers at home and in the office. Dr. Masayuki Tatemichi of Toho University School of Medicine in Tokyo and his colleagues found one-third of...
  • Darwin's greatest challenge tackled

    11/03/2004 5:11:47 PM PST · by general_re · 292 replies · 3,861+ views
    Darwin's greatest challenge tackled The mystery of eye evolution Researchers provide concrete evidence about how the human eye evolved When Darwin's skeptics attack his theory of evolution, they often focus on the eye. Darwin himself confessed that it was 'absurd' to propose that the human eye, an 'organ of extreme perfection and complication' evolved through spontaneous mutation and natural selection. But he also reasoned that "if numerous gradations from a simple and imperfect eye to one complex and perfect can be shown to exist" then this difficulty should be overcome. Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory [EMBL] have now...
  • Election Day in California: 53 House races, and hardly a real contest in sight

    10/24/2004 9:14:29 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 19 replies · 567+ views
    Monterey Herald ^ | 10/24/04 | Erica Werner - AP
    WASHINGTON - The five candidates vying to unseat Democratic Rep. Sam Farr of California have little in common - except their address and the likelihood that they will lose. The Republican, the Libertarian, the Green, the Peace and Freedom candidate and the write-in independent all work from the same donated office space in a former golf shop as they pursue longshot quests to topple the six-term House member. Their improbable arrangement saves money, but it's also a conscious statement about the near-impossibility of beating a congressional incumbent in California. "This American system of a representative government, it does not exist...
  • Short term memory's effectiveness influenced by sight, sound

    09/01/2004 1:09:12 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 9 replies · 469+ views
    eurekalert/University of Rochester ^ | 31-Aug-2004 | Jonathan Sherwood
    Public release date: 31-Aug-2004 Contact: Jonathan Sherwood jonathan.sherwood@rochester.edu 585-273-4726 University of Rochester Short term memory's effectiveness influenced by sight, sound For decades scientists have believed that people can only remember an ordered list of about seven items at a time--such as seven grocery items or seven digits of a phone number--but new research from the University of Rochester has shown that this magic number varies depending on whether the language used is spoken or signed. The results in the cover story of the latest issue of Nature Neuroscience have important implications for standardized tests, which often employ ordered-list retention as...
  • Drug to Help Avert Blindness Moves Closer to Approval

    08/27/2004 10:37:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies · 586+ views
    NY Times ^ | August 28, 2004 | ANDREW POLLACK
    Eyetech Pharmaceuticals' drug to treat the leading cause of blindness in the elderly appeared to move closer to a broad government approval yesterday after an advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration spoke favorably about it. The advisory panel was not asked to vote on whether the drug, Macugen, should be approved as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration. But committee members ruled unanimously that Eyetech had provided the F.D.A. with enough information to evaluate the drug. The panel members also did not seem to raise any serious new issues that would block approval. "It appears to me very...
  • Tooth-in-eye operation enables Thai youth to see (implanting tooth parts into eye restores vision)

    08/02/2004 7:16:05 AM PDT · by dead · 13 replies · 870+ views
    Sydney Morning Herald ^ | August 2, 2004
    A rare tooth-in-eye operation has enabled a Thai teenager to see again after six years of blindness, news reports said yesterday. Luck Pewnual, 19, now reads books and watches football on television after surgeons in Singapore completed a two-part operation implanting parts of a canine tooth into his right eye. His vision has improved since the second stage was performed in June, well enough for him to legally drive a car. Several patients from Malaysia, the Philippines and Mauritius in addition to Singaporeans have been lined up for the procedure. Pewnual's case is believed to be the first carried out...
  • Fruit Helps Eyes Stay Healthy (prevents macular degeneration)

    06/15/2004 12:36:29 AM PDT · by FairOpinion · 5 replies · 258+ views
    Forbes ^ | June 14, 2004 | Amanda Gardner
    MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDayNews) -- Bananas, oranges, and other fruits may reduce the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness among older people. Scientists have found that people who ate at least three daily servings of fruit had a 36 percent lower risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD) than people who ate fewer than 1.5 servings a day. "This is the first good study that has some statistical value that documents what we've been thinking all along," said Dr. Robert Cykiert, a professor of ophthalmology at New York University School of Medicine in New York...
  • Was Blind But Now I See

    05/12/2004 12:47:24 PM PDT · by yonif · 2 replies · 150+ views
    Israel National News ^ | 22:17 May 11, '04 / 20 Iyar 5764
    Israeli technology does not have the ability, yet, to restore the gift of sight to the blind but it comes pretty close. VirTouch is an Israeli company which specializes in computer technology for the blind. Its CEO, Arnold Roth, described ViaTouch’s revolutionary work to Israel21c. Roth said that although text and numbers are readily accessible to the blind through Braille and software that reads text aloud, “when you look beyond the text…you run into problems - things like images, photographs, maps, charts and tables.” Roth said that initially there was no solution for graphic elements other than printing them out...
  • New Weapons system shoots around corners!

    03/10/2004 6:31:30 AM PST · by vannrox · 9 replies · 613+ views
    Gizmo - New Technologies for New Times ^ | FR Post 3-8-04 | Editorial Staff
    Corner Shot is a new weapon system designed for urban combat which enables the user to observe and engage a target from behind a corner without exposing any body parts. The highly technological system was officially unveiled in late December 2003 in Israel and is already being used by some of the world?s elite Special Forces. Corner Shot attaches to most handguns currently used by Special Forces, for example the GLOCK, SIG SAUER, CZ or BERETTA. It includes a small, high-resolution camera and monitor, which can observe and view a target from various vantage points. The detachable video camera...
  • Walk by Faith Not By Sight

    11/08/2003 2:21:00 PM PST · by xzins · 1 replies · 188+ views
    "Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord: (For we walk by faith, not by sight:)" 2 Corinthians 5:6-7 (KJV) When we're living in our physical bodies, we're absent from the Lord. We can talk to him and have a relationship with him, but we can't see him. We follow his commandments through faith and we keep pressing toward the goal to be with the Lord, through faith. We can't see him, but we know he's there. That's faith, we walk by faith and not by sight....
  • Artificial Vision Offers Ray of Hope for Blind

    08/27/2003 6:39:37 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 8 replies · 157+ views
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Wednesday, August 27, 2003 | Antonio Regalado
    <p>Connie Schoeman began losing her vision in 1957 and is now blind. But since doctors placed a thin strip of electronics onto the back of her right eye in March, she has seen spots of light and bright shapes.</p> <p>The type of vision being experienced by Mrs. Schoeman, 76 years old, may be remembered one day as a giant step forward for the blind. After years of research and laboratory prototypes, artificial vision now is being extensively tested in humans for the first time. During the past two years, 26 people in the U.S. and Europe have received a variety of experimental implants, and more surgeries are planned.</p>
  • Man’s vision gives insight on seeing - Blind for 43 years Michael May can see again.

    08/25/2003 10:04:44 AM PDT · by bedolido · 50 replies · 370+ views
    Associated Press ^ | 08/25/03 | Staff Writer
    After 43 years of blindness, Michael May can see again. HE CAN play soccer with his sons, enjoy movies and, for the first time, gaze on the Sierra Nevada slopes he has expertly skied — sightless — since the late 1970s. But May can’t recognize his sons, Carson, 11, and Wyndham, 9, by their faces alone. The same goes for identifying Jennifer, his wife of 15 years. People “can’t fathom that,” said May, who owns a company in Davis, Calif., that makes navigational software for the blind. Three years after surgery restored sight to May’s right eye, researchers say May’s...
  • 'Bionic eye' Breakthrough can allow the Blind to See

    05/08/2003 5:56:12 PM PDT · by wallcrawlr · 22 replies · 267+ views
    independent.co.uk ^ | 09 May 2003 | Steve Connor
    A "bionic" eye that can help the blind to see has restored partial vision to three people who lost their sight because of incurable disease. The results of the first clinical trial of an artificial retina implanted into the eye showed that it worked well enough to allow the blind to distinguish light from dark and even to see simple objects. Each patient had an operation to have the implant fitted over their own damaged retinas. They wore spectacles fitted with miniature video cameras, which transmitted signals to the implanted device. All the patients could see far better with the...
  • Dinosaur Ancestor's Vision Possibly Nocturnal

    10/24/2002 1:25:35 PM PDT · by vannrox · 3 replies · 340+ views
    Source:Rockefeller University (http://www.rockefeller.edu/) ^ | Date:Posted 9/4/2002 | Editorial Staff - News release (see below)
    Source:   Rockefeller University (http://www.rockefeller.edu/) Date:   Posted 9/4/2002 Dinosaur Ancestor's Vision Possibly Nocturnal; Researchers Recreate 240-Million Year Old Protein In Test Tube Call it "Triassic Park": with statistics, instead of amber-preserved DNA, researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University and Yale University recreated in the test tube a functional pigment that would have characterized the eyes of archosaurs ("ruling reptiles") and allowed these direct ancestors to dinosaurs to see in dim light. The pigment, rhodopsin, was recreated based on the scientists "inferring" its protein sequence. Their findings, reported in the September issue of Molecular...