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Keyword: solutreans

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  • Younger Dryas -The Rest of the Story!

    06/21/2012 2:16:17 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    watts Up With That? ^ | June 16, 2012 | Guest Post By: Rodney Chilton
    Posted on June 16, 2012 by Anthony Watts WUWT readers may recall this recent story: New evidence of Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact The story below provides much more detail about the Younger Dryas event and the split that has developed in the scientific community over the cause. I’ve added this graph below from NCDC to give readers a sense of time and magnitude of the event. – Anthony The Younger Dryas cold interval as viewed from central Greenland. From:Quaternary Science Reviews Volume 19, Issues 1-5, 1 January 2000, Richard B. AlleyGuest Post By: Rodney Chilton www.bcclimate.com A consideration of many...
  • Americas Settled 15,000 Years Ago, Study Says

    03/13/2008 2:12:58 PM PDT · by blam · 50 replies · 1,270+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 3-13-2008 | Stefan Lovgren
    Americas Settled 15,000 Years Ago, Study Says Stefan Lovgren for National Geographic NewsMarch 13, 2008 A consensus is emerging in the highly contentious debate over the colonization of the Americas, according to a study that says the bulk of the region wasn't settled until as late as 15,000 years ago. Researchers analyzed both archaeological and genetic evidence from several dozen sites throughout the Americas and eastern Asia for the paper. "In the past archaeologists haven't paid too much attention to molecular genetic evidence," said lead author Ted Goebel, an archaeologist at Texas A&M University in College Station. "We have brought...
  • Penon Woman

    12/17/2006 4:21:22 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 1,763+ views
    Penon WomanPenon WomanScientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and Oxford's Research Laboratory of Archaeology have dated the skull to about 13,000 years old, making it...
  • An Inconvenient Truth About the First Peoples

    04/11/2017 7:19:23 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 13 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 4-11-17 | MOTUS
    Did you see this? Scientists say an ancient settlement discovered in Western Canada predates the pyramids.Triquet Island on B.C.’s Central Coast An ancient village believed to be one of the oldest human settlements ever found in North America has been discovered during an excavation on a remote island in British Columbia.  The village, which is estimated to be 14,000 years old, has been found on a rocky spit on Triquet Island, about 500 kilometres northwest of Victoria, Canada.  It is estimated the village is older than Egypt’s pyramids.  And according the CBC the find supports the oral history of the...
  • Montana Boy: Bones Show Ancestral Links to Europe

    02/24/2014 1:46:52 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 44 replies
    DER SPIEGEL ^ | February 20, 2014 | Rex Dalton
    Despite general resistence, representatives of tribes in the US recently gave their blessing for DNA analysis of the remains of a Stone Age child. Research conducted on the boy's genes indicate that Native Americans have European roots. It must have been a pretty special child, otherwise the two-year old wouldn't have been buried in such a ceremonious manner. The boy was sprinkled with celebratory red dust and given distinctive stone artifacts for his last journey. The characteristic fluting of the stone weapons serve as archeological evidence that the boy, who died some 12,600 years ago, came from the Clovis culture....
  • Rethinking the First Americans

    05/19/2019 6:38:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    YouTube ^ | May 6, 2015 | Presented by Wilson 'Dub' Crook
    Who are the first Americans? In the 1920s and 30s, discoveries made near Clovis, NM suggested a prehistoric Paleo-Indian culture that dates back nearly 13,200 years ago. But new evidence may actually point to Texas as a possible origin. Archaeologist Wilson W. "Dub" Crook has found that may just change the way we see history.
  • Iberia’s Neolithic Farmers Linked to Modern-Day Basques

    09/08/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Tuesday, September 08, 2015
    DNA samples were obtained from eight early Iberian farmers whose remains were discovered in Spain’s El Portalón cave in Atapuerca. Like populations in central and northern Europe, the Iberian farmers had traveled from the south and mixed with local hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetic variation observed in modern-day Basques is significantly closer to the newly sequenced early farmers than to older Iberian hunter-gatherer samples,” “Parts of that early farmer population probably remained relatively isolated since then (which we can still see in the distinct culture and language of Basques)
  • And two became one: ancient American lineages reunited to head south

    06/01/2018 5:58:43 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 12 replies
    Cosmos ^ | 1 Jun, 2018 | Jeff Glorfeld
    A new study suggests a commonly held belief – that the majority of Native North, Central and South Americans derived from one ancestry – is “unrealistically simple”. Earlier research suggested the first people to enter the Americas split into two ancestral branches, the northern and southern, and that the "southern branch" gave rise to all populations in Central and South America. However the latest work finds that most, if not all, of the indigenous peoples of the southern continent retain, deep in their genetic history, at least some DNA from the "northern branch" -- the direct ancestors of many native...
  • Date Limit Set On First Americans

    07/22/2003 6:11:50 PM PDT · by blam · 34 replies · 442+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-22-2003 | Paul Rincon
    Date limit set on first Americans By Paul Rincon BBC Science A new genetic study deals a blow to claims that humans reached America at least 30,000 years ago - around the same time that people were colonising Europe. Kennewick Man, a 9,300-year-old American The subject of when humans first arrived in America is hotly contested by academics. On one side of the argument are researchers who claim America was first populated around 13,000 years ago, toward the end of the last Ice Age. On the other are those who propose a much earlier date for colonisation of the continent...
  • First Americans

    10/06/2002 9:57:05 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 4,116+ views
    Discover ^ | 2-1999 | Karen Wright
    Discover Feb, 1999 First Americans.(origins of man) Author/s: Karen Wright Not long ago we thought the first humans in the New World were mammoth hunters from Siberia who crossed the Bering Strait at the end of the Ice Age. Now, we are learning, none of that may be true not the who, not the where, not the how, and certainly not the when. You don't expect someone who has been dead for more than 9,000 years to have any odor left--let alone a strong one. But you don't expect him to have any hair or skin or clothes left, either,...
  • Does Skull Prove That The First Americans Came From Europe?

    11/24/2007 11:28:47 AM PST · by blam · 90 replies · 930+ views
    UTexas.edu ^ | 12-03-2002 | Steve Conner
    Does skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe? By Steve Connor Science Editor 03 December 2002 Scientists in Britain have identified the oldest skeleton ever found on the American continent in a discovery that raises fresh questions about the accepted theory of how the first people arrived in the New World. The skeleton's perfectly preserved skull belonged to a 26-year-old woman who died during the last ice age on the edge of a giant prehistoric lake which once formed around an area now occupied by the sprawling suburbs of Mexico City. Scientists from Liverpool's John Moores University and...
  • New clues emerge about the earliest known Americans

    11/21/2015 10:27:26 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Vanderbilt U ^ | November 18, 2015 | Liz Entman
    The stone tools discovered by the team were similar to what Dillehay had previously found at Monte Verde. Many were simple unifacial tools -- meaning they were worked on only one side of the stone, to create a sharp edge -- though some of the younger tools and projectile points indicate bifacial technologies... The bones tended to be small fragments, broken and scorched, indicating that the animals had been cooked. They often came from very large animals, like prehistoric llamas or mastodons, as well as smaller creatures like prehistoric deer and horses. The Monte Verde site was unlikely to have...
  • Sifting for Clues at W.Md. Dig

    09/15/2004 8:46:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 471+ views
    Washington Post ^ | Saturday, September 11, 2004 | Mary Otto
    Radiocarbon dating of charcoal found elsewhere on this site has suggested people might have camped here and built fires by the north branch of the Potomac River, anywhere from 9,000 years ago to as much as 16,000 years ago... Some tools and bones have been found in Pennsylvania and Virginia that date well before the Clovis era, although scientists debate whether the dating is accurate.
  • The Iceman Cameth [Solutreans, Pre-Clovis]

    10/02/2015 11:41:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 2, 2015 | Patrick Hahn
    All early American ancestors hailed from East Asia and Siberia? Not so fast, says a prominent scientist... Stanford shows me some other artifacts. In addition to bifacial spear points, there are bone points, spear throwers, bow drills, hammerstones, scrapers, and flat stones that still retain traces of birch sap, which may have been used to apply waterproof seals to their boats. “Everything the Solutreans had, they have here,” Stanford explains. “Of course, that’s just coincidence.” Then he laughs that infectious laugh of his... Stanford opens another drawer and shows some spear points recovered from Tennessee. The points are over 14,000...
  • When Did Humans Come to the Americas?

    01/27/2013 9:08:44 PM PST · by Theoria · 36 replies
    Smithsonian Mag ^ | Feb 2013 | Guy Gugliotta
    Recent scientific findings date their arrival earlier than ever thought, sparking hot debate among archaeologists For much of its length, the slow-moving Aucilla River in northern Florida flows underground, tunneling through bedrock limestone. But here and there it surfaces, and preserved in those inky ponds lie secrets of the first Americans.For years adventurous divers had hunted fossils and artifacts in the sinkholes of the Aucilla about an hour east of Tallahassee. They found stone arrowheads and the bones of extinct mammals such as mammoth, mastodon and the American ice age horse.Then, in the 1980s, archaeologists from the Florida Museum of...
  • Vintage Skulls

    02/22/2003 9:06:38 AM PST · by blam · 140 replies · 4,437+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | March/April 2003 | Colleen P. Popson
    VINTAGE SKULLS Researcher Silvia Gonzalez examines a 13,000-year-old skull. (Liverpool John Moores University) The oldest human remains found in the Americas were recently "discovered" in the storeroom of Mexico's National Museum of Anthropology. Found in central Mexico in 1959, the five skulls were radiocarbon dated by a team of researchers from the United Kingdom and Mexico and found to be 13,000 years old. They pre-date the Clovis culture by a couple thousand years, adding to the growing evidence against the Clovis-first model for the first peopling of the Americas. Of additional significance is the shape of the skulls, which are...
  • Bye, Bye Beringia (8,000 Year Old Site In Florida)

    08/11/2003 7:26:47 PM PDT · by blam · 133 replies · 9,427+ views
    Explore North ^ | 8-12-2003 | Bill Jones
    Bye Bye, Beringia Anthropology and Archaeology of The Americas by Bill Jones One might think that Archeology sites throughout the World have produced many datable human remains. Nothing could be further from the truth. Ancient human remains have so rarely been found that these singular findings could not be connected to others to form chronologies about human evolution. The scarcity of human remains to be analyzed has prevented the sciences of Anthropology and Archaeology from forming conclusions about the cultural levels of ancient humans. We try to measure the culture of a people in terms of the totality of their...
  • European DNA Found In 7-8,000 Year Old Skeleton In Florida (Windover)

    08/14/2003 7:40:03 PM PDT · by blam · 129 replies · 6,996+ views
    TLC ^ | 8-14-2003 | blam
    Earlier I posted an article titled Bye, Bye Beringia (8,000 Year Old Site In Florida. I just turned on The Learning Channel and caught about ten minutes of the ending of a program titled, 'Secrets Of The Bog People: Windover', it is about this 'Windover' site in Florida. A doctor Gregory from Cornell said that preliminary DNA samples taken from the brains of some of the people indicate they are European. They also showed a reconstructed face of one of the skulls. I checked my TLC schedule and it indicates that another showing will be at 11:00PM CST tonight. This...
  • First Americans May Have Been European

    02/19/2006 9:08:52 PM PST · by anymouse · 133 replies · 3,061+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 2/19/06 | Bjorn Carey
    ST. LOUIS—The first humans to spread across North America may have been seal hunters from France and Spain. This runs counter to the long-held belief that the first human entry into the Americas was a crossing of a land-ice bridge that spanned the Bering Strait about 13,500 years ago. The new thinking was outlined here Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The tools don’t match Recent studies have suggested that the glaciers that helped form the bridge connecting Siberia and Alaska began receding around 17,000 to 13,000 years ago, leaving very little...
  • First Americans arrived as 2 separate migrations, according to new genetic evidence

    01/09/2009 7:12:43 AM PST · by Red Badger · 47 replies · 1,104+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 01/09/2009 | Source: Cell Press
    The first people to arrive in America traveled as at least two separate groups to arrive in their new home at about the same time, according to new genetic evidence published online on January 8th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. After the Last Glacial Maximum some 15,000 to 17,000 years ago, one group entered North America from Beringia following the ice-free Pacific coastline, while another traversed an open land corridor between two ice sheets to arrive directly into the region east of the Rocky Mountains. (Beringia is the landmass that connected northeast Siberia to Alaska during the last...