Keyword: sovietunion

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  • Sarah Palin was mocked in '08 for saying Putin invade Ukraine if Obama elected

    02/17/2018 7:08:11 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 30 replies
    Breitbart ^ | Tony Lee
    Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin warned that if Senator Barack Obama were elected president, his “indecision” and “moral equivalence” may encourage Russia’s Vladimir Putin to invade Ukraine. Palin said then: After the Russian Army invaded the nation of Georgia, Senator Obama’s reaction was one of indecision and moral equivalence, the kind of response that would only encourage Russia’s Putin to invade Ukraine next. For those comments, she was mocked by the high-brow Foreign Policy magazine and its editor Blake Hounshell, who now is one of the editors of Politico magazine. Hounshell wrote then that Palin’s comments were “strange” and...
  • Russian Interference Warning from 2015: Russia has Reached its Own Very Different 'End of History'

    02/16/2018 2:06:33 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 35 replies
    The Interpreter ^ | July 2015 | Irina Pavlova
    Russia is now experiencing its own “end of history,” but it has turned out to be “not liberal democracy but a new turn back to the enslavement of Russian society, the consequences of which will be its further degradation with prospects that are dangerous both for the country itself and for the entire world.” The West generally and the US in particular need to display both wisdom and political will to effectively oppose the political challenge the Kremlin now presents. It has been an unwelcome surprise for Western publics how well the Kremlin and its ‘information forces’ have studied the...
  • Putin Repeating Seven Mistakes Soviet Leaders Made Before 1991

    02/07/2018 12:41:13 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 30 replies
    Window on Eurasia (translation) ^ | Feb 7, 2018 | Igor Eidman
    1. Putin like Gorbachev has entered an arms race with a weak economy that can’t support it. 2. Putin has gotten involved in long-running foreign policy “adventures,” Afghanistan in the case of Gorbachev who ultimately got out of that one and Putin in the case of Ukraine. 3. Putin is prepared to fund all the misfits of the world who are prepared to support him just as Soviet leaders including Gorbachev until the money ran out were prepared to back those of “’a socialist orientation.’” 4. Putin is spending enormous sums on “pompous celebrations and ‘projects of the century’ like...
  • Former Soviet Spy Sees the Long Arm of the KGB in Today's Muslim Anti-Semitism

    02/06/2018 12:23:22 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 11 replies
    On a reporting trip to Gaza, Amman, and Damascus in 1994, I made a habit of asking Hamas and Muslim Brotherhood leaders whom I met the following question: Did they think the Jews had a plan to dominate the world? I’ll never forget the enthusiastic answer of a pediatrician named Abdelaziz Rantissi, a Hamas leader, whom I met in his doctor’s office in Gaza. “Yes, indeed,” he said. “I have a copy right here.” And he pulled down from a shelf an Arabic-language copy of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. It was a response I heard again and...
  • Russia's Gulag camps cast in forgiving light of Putin nationalism

    02/05/2018 1:50:23 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 20 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Shaun Walker
    In today’s Russia it is not fashionable to delve too deeply into Gulag history, and 60-year-old Panikarov’s collection is one of just two museums devoted entirely to the Gulag in the whole country. Indeed, even Panikarov himself has a somewhat surprising view: “We should not have one-sided evaluations... “It was fashionable to say bad things about the USSR. Now it is again fashionable to insult Russia. We have sanctions against us. The west looks for negative things.” Panikarov’s views on the Gulag are part of a larger trend. With the Soviet victory in the second world war elevated to a...
  • Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine

    02/03/2018 2:27:44 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 13 replies
    Amazon ^ | 2017 | Anne Applebaum
    In 1929 Stalin launched his policy of agricultural collectivization—in effect a second Russian revolution—which forced millions of peasants off their land and onto collective farms. The result was a catastrophic famine, the most lethal in European history. At least five million people died between 1931 and 1933 in the USSR. But instead of sending relief the Soviet state made use of the catastrophe to rid itself of a political problem. In Red Famine, Anne Applebaum argues that more than three million of those dead were Ukrainians who perished not because they were accidental victims of a bad policy but because...
  • GULAG: Understanding the Magnitude of What Happened

    02/02/2018 8:32:53 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 13 replies
    Heritage Foundation ^ | Anne Applebaum
    One of the things that always strikes contemporary visitors to Russia is the lack of monuments to the victims of Stalin's execution squads and concentration camps. There are a few scattered memorials, but no national monument or place of mourning. Worse, 15 years after glasnost, 10 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, there have been no trials, no truth and reconciliation commissions, no government inquiries into what happened in the past, and no public debate. This was not always the case. During the 1980s, when glasnost was just beginning in Russia, Gulag survivors' memoirs sold millions of copies,...
  • 74 years since Siege of Leningrad

    01/29/2018 9:42:23 PM PST · by beaversmom · 2 replies
    The Tribune of India ^ | January 29, 2018
    World War II guns fire a salute during celebrations of the 74th anniversary of the battle that lifted the Siege of Leningrad in St. Petersburg, on Saturday. The city of St. Petersburg, known as Leningrad until the name was changed back in 1991, is celebrating the Soviets’ victory over the devastating Nazi siege. The city was besieged by German, Finnish and Spanish troops on September 8, 1941, when the Nazis launched Operation Barbarossa against the Soviet Union. The blockade was broken on January 18, 1943 but finally lifted on January 27, 1944. Over 1 million people died mainly from starvation...
  • Russia warns Poland not to touch Soviet WW2 memorials

    01/28/2018 12:32:58 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 85 replies
    The Red Army's defeat of Nazi German forces on Polish soil in 1944-1945 remains a thorny issue in Russian-Polish relations. Many Poles viewed the Red Army as an occupation force, not as liberators, as the 1939 Nazi-Soviet pact had carved up Poland between two dictatorships. Poland updated its "de-communisation" legislation, banning "totalitarian" symbols, which would include Soviet propaganda monuments. The Russian foreign ministry condemned the new Polish "de-communisation" law as "an outrageous provocation", and warned of unspecified "consequences". "The USSR paid the highest price to liberate Poland - on that country's soil, in battles with the enemy, more than 600,000...
  • Iconic MiG-21 Soviet fighter reaches twilight years in Europe

    01/18/2018 7:59:22 PM PST · by sukhoi-30mki · 13 replies
    STARS AND STRIPES ^ | January 18, 2018 | SLOBODAN LEKIC
    KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany — During the Cold War, the MiG-21 fighter and the Kalashnikov AK-47 assault rifle epitomized the might of the Soviet Bloc as it confronted the West in Europe. Although the MiG-21 — dubbed Fishbed by NATO — never saw combat in a NATO-Warsaw Pact war, the most iconic Soviet fighter of the jet age frequently tangled with American and other Western warplanes in hot wars in Vietnam, the Middle East and Africa. But nearly 60 years after it first entered front-line service with the Soviet air force — and 33 years since production ceased — the single-engine interceptor...
  • 'They raped every German female from eight to 80'

    01/18/2018 1:30:31 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 136 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Antony Beevor
    The Soviet armies advancing into East Prussia in January 1945, in huge, long columns, were an extraordinary mixture of modern and medieval: tank troops in padded black helmets, Cossack cavalrymen on shaggy mounts with loot strapped to the saddle, lend-lease Studebakers and Dodges towing light field guns, and then a second echelon in horse-drawn carts. The variety of character among the soldiers was almost as great as that of their military equipment. There were freebooters who drank and raped quite shamelessly, and there were idealistic, austere communists and members of the intelligentsia appalled by such behaviour. Beria and Stalin, back...
  • "Can a Christian be a Communist?" - Sermon by Martin Luther King Jr.

    01/12/2018 3:39:25 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 63 replies
    Martin Luther King Papers Project ^ | September 30, 1962 | Martin Luther King Jr.
    Now, let us begin by answering the question which our sermon topic raises: Can a Christian be a communist? I answer that question with an emphatic “no.” These two philosophies are diametrically opposed. The basic philosophy of Christianity is unalterably opposed to the basic philosophy of communism, and all of the dialectics of the logician cannot make them lie down together. They are contrary philosophies. Now, there are at least three reasons why I feel obligated as a Christian minister to talk to you about communism. The first reason grows out of the fact that communism is having widespread influence...
  • Stalin popularity among Russians reaches a 16-year high, poll shows

    01/10/2018 5:46:52 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 19 replies
    The Spokesman-Review ^ | 2017 | Adam Taylor
    While Stalin is a widely reviled figure in the West, he has a more complicated legacy in Russia, where many remember him as being a strong figure in the country, especially during World War II. In recent years, Russian President Vladimir Putin has pushed for a revised view of Stalin’s legacy that downplays his role in mass purges as simply mistakes made by a great leader. A total of 46 percent of Russians expressed some kind of positive view of Stalin in Levada’s poll, the highest percentage of positive answers since Levada began asking the question in 2001. Thirty-two percent...
  • Russian Nostalgia for Soviet Times Not Nostalgia for Soviet Realities, Psychologist Says

    01/02/2018 8:07:24 AM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 15 replies
    Nadezhda Vlasova says that those who are nostalgic for the Soviet Union include both those whose youth was passed while it existed and who remember it through the gauzy lens of memory and young people who did not live then but who believe because of what some of their elders say that life was better ( She points out that this is much like the reaction of those who like “romantic films about the Middle Ages with beautiful dresses and architecture” but who in no case “would like to live in a city without plumbing.” Russians today look at the...
  • Majority of Russians Regret Soviet Collapse, Poll Says

    12/26/2017 2:40:32 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 96 replies
    The Moscow Times ^ | December 25, 2017
    The number of Russians who regret the collapse of the Soviet Union is the highest in nearly a decade, according to an independent Levada Center poll published Monday. In polls taken since 1992, an average two-thirds of respondents said they lamented the collapse of the USSR, peaking at 75 percent in 2000 and dipping to 49 percent in 2012.
  • A Past That Divides: Russia’s New Official History

    12/16/2017 1:36:30 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 1 replies
    Carnegie Moscow Center ^ | Oct 2017 | Andrei Kolesnikov
    Sometimes a state’s official view of the past can serve as the basis for an unwritten social contract between a government and its citizens. This is what is happening in Russia today. President Vladimir Putin has introduced the idea of what he terms a “thousand-year history” that Russians must take pride in, a history that incorporates many victorious pages from the country’s past, including Russia’s takeover of Crimea in 2014. This glorious history is offered to citizens in exchange for their political loyalty, and it is presented as being more important than economic progress. Putin’s personal role has been critical...
  • History's Losers: intimate stories from survivors of the Soviet empire

    11/15/2017 11:01:55 AM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 29 replies
    New Statesman ^ | Catherine Merridale
    Second-Hand Time by Svetlana Alexievich, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2015, is not so much an oral history as a lament. The work is multi-vocal, like a chorus, pierced in places by the solo of an anguished voice. Readers are swept on by a cadence that can ebb and swell with tidal force. The tone induces something close to a trance, demanding a complete surrender to its message of despair. This is no dry account of politics, no tasteful essay on the ending of the Soviet dream. Like any true lament, it comes from a primeval...
  • Remembering Stalingrad 75 Years Later

    11/09/2017 7:04:26 AM PST · by Kaslin · 83 replies ^ | November 9, 2017 | Victor Davis Hanson
    Seventy-five years ago this month, the Soviet Red Army surrounded --and would soon destroy -- a huge invading German army at Stalingrad on the Volga River. Nearly 300,000 of Germany's best soldiers would never return home. The epic 1942-43 battle for the city saw the complete annihilation of the attacking German 6th Army. It marked the turning point of World War II. Before Stalingrad, Adolf Hitler regularly boasted on German radio as his victorious forces pressed their offensives worldwide. After Stalingrad, Hitler went quiet, brooding in his various bunkers for the rest of the war. During the horrific Battle of...
  • 100 Years of Communism—and 100 Million Dead

    11/07/2017 10:42:38 AM PST · by PROCON · 53 replies ^ | Nov. 7, 2017 | David Satter
    The Bolshevik plague that began in Russia was the greatest catastrophe in human history.Armed Bolsheviks seized the Winter Palace in Petrograd—now St. Petersburg—100 years ago this week and arrested ministers of Russia’s provisional government. They set in motion a chain of events that would kill millions and inflict a near-fatal wound on Western civilization. The revolutionaries’ capture of train stations, post offices and telegraphs took place as the city slept and resembled a changing of the guard. But when residents of the Russian capital awoke, they found they were living in a different universe.Although the Bolsheviks called for the abolition...
  • Communism Turns 100

    11/01/2017 6:07:03 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 18 replies ^ | November 1, 2017 | John Stossel
    This year marks the hundredth anniversary of one of the worst mistakes ever made: the Communist revolution in Russia. Communist regimes went on to kill about 100 million people. Most died in famines after socialist tyrants forced people to practice inefficient collective farming. Millions of others were executed in political purges. Yet when the Russian Revolution happened, people both inside and outside Russia were excited. Crowds cheered Lenin. No longer would nobles rule; no longer would capitalists exploit workers. Now the people would prosper together. British journalist Theodore Rothstein wrote, "The undivided sway of the Imperialist nightmare is at an...