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Keyword: spaceflight

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  • Is Human Hibernation Possible? Going to Sleep for Long Duration Spaceflight

    06/23/2017 8:11:58 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    Universe Today ^ | 06/21/2017 | Fraser Cain
    The current state of this technology is really promising. They use a technique called therapeutic hypothermia, which lowers the temperature of a person by a few degrees...With the lowered temperature, a human’s metabolism decreases and they fall unconscious into a torpor. ... A few years ago, SpaceWorks Enterprises delivered a report to NASA on how they could use this therapeutic hypothermia for long duration spaceflight within the Solar System. Currently, a trip to Mars takes about 6-9 months. And during that time, the human passengers are going to be using up precious air, water and food. But in this torpor...
  • NASA, heeding Trump, may add astronauts to a test flight moon mission

    02/15/2017 10:54:32 AM PST · by rktman · 14 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | 2/15/2017 | Joel Achenbach
    According to current plans, a crewed mission, EM-2, would not be launched until several years later under the NASA timeline — certainly not during Trump's current term. That crewed mission would also orbit the moon. But on Wednesday, NASA's acting administrator, Robert Lightfoot, sent a letter to employees saying he'd instructed the top NASA official for human spaceflight, associate administrator William Gerstenmaier, to explore the feasibility of adding astronauts to the EM-1 flight.
  • Humanity may not need a warp drive to go interstellar

    08/14/2016 4:49:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 37 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | August 10, 2016 | David Warmflash
    Here are a few ways that humanity may be able to leave the cradle of Earth. The field equations of Einstein’s General Relativity theory say that faster-than-light (FTL) travel is possible, so a handful of researchers are working to see whether a Star Trek-style warp drive, or perhaps a kind of artificial wormhole, could be created through our technology. But even if shown feasible tomorrow, it’s possible that designs for an FTL system could be as far ahead of a functional starship as Leonardo da Vinci’s 16th century drawings of flying machines were ahead of the Wright Flyer of 1903....
  • Here Comes The First Pilot-Less Private Space Shuttle

    07/30/2016 8:26:36 AM PDT · by rktman · 25 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | 7/29/2016 | Andrew Follett
    The space company Sierra Nevada shipped the world’s first private, pilot-less space shuttle to California for testing Thursday. The pilot-less shuttle, called Dream Chaser, will undergo its first test flight later in 2016, and the Sierra Nevada plans to send the shuttle into space in late 2019. “We’re going to take it up to a very high altitude. We’re going to drop it and it’s going to fly itself,” Mark Sirangelo, the vice president of Sierra Nevada Space Systems, told a local Colorado news outlet. “It’s autonomous space vehicle, which means that onboard computers control everything that it does.” Currently,...
  • Mice flown in space show nascent liver damage

    04/20/2016 10:02:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    n a discovery with implications for long-term spaceflight and future missions to Mars, a researcher at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has found that mice flown aboard the space shuttle Atlantis returned to Earth with early signs of liver disease. "Prior to this study we really didn't have much information on the impact of spaceflight on the liver," said the study's lead author Karen Jonscher, PhD, an associate professor of anesthesiology and a physicist at CU Anschutz. "We knew that astronauts often returned with diabetes-like symptoms but they usually resolved quickly." But the prospect of liver damage raises...
  • Challenger 7: 30 Years Ago

    January 28th marks 30 years since the Challenger Disaster. Seems so long ago, yet it is one of those days people never forget. School was out that day, probably because of bad weather, and I remember watching on television the news showing the explosion over and over. I will never forget. We didn’t give up on spaceflight that day, but I wish more would have seen the real promise of the Final Frontier. Instead, many in government still see it as another “get-elected-for-a-few-years” opportunity. The vision of government sees only through the next election cycle, not seven generations hence. There...
  • JPL and Its Spacecraft Exploratory Missions

    08/06/2015 7:11:28 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 2 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 08/06/15 | Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh
    Once you visit the Space Flight Operations Facility, "I've been to the center of the Universe." On a recent trip to California, I was constantly reminded of what is wrong with California, a state whose economy was so booming decades ago that, had it been a stand-alone state, it would have been the world’s sixth largest economy. Looking at this state now, ravaged by years and years of Marxist policies, open borders, unchecked illegal immigration, anchor babies, multiculturalism, insane diversity rules, sanctuary cities, multi-lingual school system, illegal voting, tax everything and tax again, and environmentalist-driven water use plans including but...
  • China claims to have the world’s first material for light-propelled spaceflight (Graphene)

    06/30/2015 8:50:21 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    China Daily Mail ^ | June 30, 2015
    The following is based on a translation of a report in Chinese media: According to xinhuanet.com’s report on June 19, through 3 years of research, Prof. Chen Yongsheng of the College of Chemistry and Prof. Tian Jianguo of the Institute of Physics, Nankai University have obtained a special graphene material for light-driven flight. Due to the special electronic characteristic of graphene and the macrostructure and form of the material, the material is able to get driving force from light 1,000 times greater than ordinary light pressure. The website’s reporter claimed to have seen with his own eyes a graphene sponge...
  • Quietly, NASA is reconsidering the moon as a destination

    04/04/2015 12:59:51 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 77 replies
    Houston Chronicle ^ | April 3, 2015 | Eric Berger
    Despite a declaration from President Barack Obama that the moon is not a planned destination for American astronauts, senior NASA engineers have quietly begun reconsidering using it as a staging point for an eventual mission to Mars.William Gerstenmaier, the chief of human exploration for NASA, does not see the president's plan of a direct, 900-day mission to the red planet as achievable. Instead, Gerstenmaier believes large amounts of ice at the lunar poles may provide an important reservoir of oxygen and hydrogen fuel to propel rockets and spaceships across the 40 million miles of space to Mars."If propellant was available...
  • NASA SELECTS SPACEX TO BE PART OF AMERICA’S HUMAN SPACEFLIGHT PROGRAM

    12/29/2014 4:10:39 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 27 replies
    SpaceX ^ | September 16, 2014 | SpaceX
    Today, NASA selected SpaceX’s Falcon 9 launch vehicle and Dragon spacecraft to fly American astronauts to the International Space Station under the Commercial Crew Program. SpaceX is deeply honored by the trust NASA has placed in us, and we welcome today’s decision and the mission it advances with gratitude and seriousness of purpose. Under the $2.6 billion contract, SpaceX will launch the Crew Dragon spacecraft atop the Falcon 9 launch vehicle from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.
  • Three Chinese Nationals and Two Corporations Charged with Illegally Exporting Defense Articles...

    10/06/2009 7:30:13 PM PDT · by Cindy · 13 replies · 1,035+ views
    Boston.FBI.gov - DOJ Press Release ^ | October 5, 2009 | n/a
    Note: The following text is a quote: Three Chinese Nationals and Two Corporations Charged with Illegally Exporting Defense Articles and Commerce Controlled Electronics Components to China and Conspiring to Violate U.S. Export Laws BOSTON, MA—Three nationals of the People’s Republic of China and two corporations were charged on October 1, 2009 in federal court with conspiring over a period of 10 years to illegally export defense articles, designated on the United States Munitions List, and Commerce controlled electronics components to end-users in China, including several Chinese military entities. Acting United States Attorney Michael K. Loucks; John J. McKenna, Special Agent...
  • California vies for new space industry

    08/24/2013 9:23:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 19 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 24, 2013 11:07 AM EDT | Mihir Zaveri
    As several new private ventures to take people on trips to space come closer to becoming reality, California lawmakers are racing other states to woo the new space companies with cushy incentives. They are debating a bill now in Sacramento that would insulate manufacturers of spaceships and parts suppliers from liability should travelers get injured or killed on a voyage, except in cases such as gross negligence or intentional wrongdoing. Last year, the state enacted a law that shields space tourism companies such as Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic from similar lawsuits. “We’re still in the fledgling part of space...
  • Capitalism In Space

    08/14/2012 11:54:26 AM PDT · by NonZeroSum · 25 replies
    National Review ^ | August 10th, 2012 | Rand Simberg
    Ever since the Obama administration’s rollout of its space policy two and a half years ago, conventional ideological wisdom has been turned on its head. An administration that had seemed eager to increase government involvement in everything from auto companies to health care proposed a more competitive, privatized approach to spaceflight, and people claiming to be conservatives blasted it, demanding that the traditional (and failing) NASA monopoly continue. Jim Muncy, a former aide on space policy to California congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R.), put it cleverly: “Democrats don’t think that capitalism works within the atmosphere, and Republicans apparently don’t think it...
  • What Does The Success Of Dragon Mean?

    06/04/2012 10:35:45 AM PDT · by NonZeroSum · 13 replies
    PJMedia ^ | May 31st, 2012 | Rand Simberg
    SpaceX’s Dragon capsule completed a nearly perfect flight this morning, splashing down as planned in the Pacific Ocean within a mile of its target. It replicated everything that the Gemini series of flights in the sixties did in a single flight — getting to orbit, performing a rendezvous with another object, closely approaching it, berthing to it, detaching from it, and entering the atmosphere to be retrieved by a ship — except that it was entirely unmanned (so no spacewalk — that will await flights with crew aboard). The only problem encountered was an issue with the LIDAR, the laser...
  • Rationalizing Our Approach To Space Safety

    06/04/2012 10:31:47 AM PDT · by NonZeroSum
    Kickstarter ^ | May 15th, 2012 | Rand Simberg
    For my next project at CEI, I’m planning to do an Issue Analysis (similar to the one I did on Space Property Rights) laying out the history of risk and safety regulations, to provide some context for what is happening with both commercial crew (and other human spaceflight) at NASA, and with potential regulations that the FAA-AST may impose when the moratorium ends in 2015 (it will also make the case for extension).
  • U.S. Air Force space plane marks one year in orbit

    03/05/2012 7:05:31 PM PST · by U-238 · 6 replies
    Spaceflight Now ^ | 3/4/2012 | Stephen Clark
    The U.S. Air Force's second X-37B space plane marked one year in orbit Monday, continuing its clandestine mission more than 200 miles above Earth. The robotic spacecraft's purpose is secret, but Air Force officials acknowledge the vehicle is performing well one year after it blasted off on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket on March 5, 2011. "We are very pleased with the results of the on-going X-37B experiments," said Lt. Col. Tom McIntyre, X-37B program director in the Air Force's Rapid Capabilities Office. "The X-37B program is setting the standard for a reusable space plane and, on this...
  • John Glenn Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of His Historic Flight

    02/24/2012 3:00:10 AM PST · by Makana · 17 replies
    Fox News ^ | February 17, 2012 | AP
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – John Glenn fever has taken hold of Cape Canaveral once again. Three days before the 50th anniversary of his historic flight, the first American to orbit the Earth addressed employees at Kennedy Space Center. The NASA auditorium was packed Friday with hundreds of workers, many of whom stood along the walls to see the space legend. The 90-year-old Glenn was joined on stage by Scott Carpenter, 86, the only other survivor of the original Mercury 7 astronauts. Glenn recalled how he and his fellow Mercury astronauts traveled to Cape Canaveral to watch a missile blast off....
  • Race To Mine The Moon Heats Up

    10/27/2011 9:22:03 PM PDT · by Captain Beyond · 23 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | 10/27/2011 | Loren Grush
    Astrobotic Technology's Red Rover, a lunar exploration vehicle that the company claims will be able to scout and drill for precious resources at the moon's poles. Moon, we just can’t quit you. NASA has shifted its goals from returning to the moon to visiting an asteroid or even Mars, but not everyone has given up on going back. The space agency's attention deficit has sparked a race among private companies eager to return to Earth's satellite.Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/10/27/race-to-mine-moon-heats-up/#ixzz1c2sHUuBP
  • Capturing an asteroid into Earth orbit

    08/25/2011 10:03:57 AM PDT · by BobZimmerman · 54 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | August 26, 2011 | Robert Zimmerman
    Want to mine an asteroid? Rather than travel to it with all their mining equipment, three Chinese scientists have proposed a better way. In a paper published today on the Los Alamos astro-ph preprint website, they have calculated the energy required to shift the orbits of the six thousand near-Earth asteroids and place them in Earth orbit for later mining. Of these, they found 46 asteroids that had the potential for such an operation, and two likely candidates for a space mission. One 30-foot-wide asteroid, 2008EA9, will actually be in the right place for this technique in 2049.
  • A cloudy vision of U.S. spaceflight (Lost in Space .. The Obama Years)

    07/19/2011 3:52:31 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 7/19/11 | Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan
    When the orbiter Atlantis lands at Kennedy Space Center on Thursday, ending the 30-year-old space shuttle program, NASA will have its sights set on the next big exploration mission: sending astronauts to an asteroid in about 15 years. But the path to that goal remains poorly defined, jeopardized by a bleak budget outlook and a weak political consensus. It has left a deep angst that U.S. leadership in space flight is in rapid decline and the very ability to fly humans off the Earth is at risk. "I'm very disappointed about where we are today," said Robert L. Crippen, who...