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Keyword: stevenweinberg

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  • Why quantum mechanics might need an overhaul

    11/26/2016 6:19:48 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 61 replies
    Science News ^ | November 4, 2016 | Tom Siegfried
    Why quantum mechanics might need an overhaul by Tom Siegfried 3:37pm, November 4, 2016 Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg says current debates suggest need for new approach to comprehend reality SAN ANTONIO ? Quantum mechanics is science’s equivalent of political polarization. Voters either take sides and argue with each other endlessly, or stay home and accept politics as it is. Physicists either just accept quantum mechanics and do their calculations, or take sides in the never-ending debate over what quantum mechanics is actually saying about reality. Steven Weinberg used to be happy with quantum mechanics as it is and didn’t worry...
  • A Darwinist Religious Experience Described

    04/13/2009 8:35:28 AM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 8 replies · 755+ views
    CEH ^ | April 11, 2009
    A Darwinist Religious Experience Described April 11, 2009 — As millions of Jews just completed Passover, and as millions of Christians gather to celebrate Easter, a Darwinist reporter was experiencing “existential vertigo” – a sweeping sense of dizziness as her imagination zoomed in and out of the implications of her faith. It may be the closest thing that a secular materialist can call a religious experience. And religious experience is an accurate description: it was the outworking of an all-encompassing world view, with ultimate causes, ultimate destinies, moral imperatives, and heavy doses of faith. Amanda Gefter (see her previous attack...
  • Brooking No Debate: Scientism, Crowbars, and Bats

    01/02/2007 8:27:12 PM PST · by Mr. Silverback · 249 replies · 2,969+ views
    Breakpoint with Chuck Colson ^ | 1/2/2007 | Chuck Colson
    The late Stephen Jay Gould at Harvard used to describe religion and science as occupying “non-overlapping magisterial authority,” or what he called NOMA. That is, science and religion occupied different “domains,” or areas of life, in which each held “the appropriate tools for meaningful discourse and resolution.” There were many problems with Gould’s approach, but at least a lack of respect for religion and religious people wasn’t one of them. Not so with some of today’s scientists. The New York Times reported on a conference recently held in Costa Mesa, California, that turned into the secular materialist equivalent of a...