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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Forget Wimpy Plans and NIMBYs, Let's Solve the Energy Crisis by Blowing Up Mercury

    10/15/2012 6:43:50 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 9 replies
    Motherboard ^ | 4/4/12 | Dr. Derek Mead
    Forget Wimpy Plans and NIMBYs, Let's Solve the Energy Crisis by Blowing Up Mercury Posted by Derek_Mead on Wednesday, Apr 04, 2012 Save this post NextPrev Add This With all the squabbling about oil killing us all, climate change screwing with polar bears, nuclear plants falling apart, solar panels sucking on a cloudy day, and wind turbines scything through migratory birds with a gory violence best explained by an Omega Crom song, there’s a big point that all the complainers in the energy debate are ignoring: These days, we are being huge wimps. Millennia ago us humans were building...
  • America's most attractive politicians: Mitt Romney and Sarah Palin head scientists' list...

    09/03/2012 2:29:50 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 2, 2012 | Staff
    •Political scientists from UCLA compare candidates based on 'competence' •Most students interpreted 'competence' as 'attractiveness' •Mitt Romney scored in the 99th percentile, Sarah Palin in the 95th and Paul Ryan in the 67th •'If the election were decided on looks, it would be no contest' Republican duo Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan are one of the hottest tickets this nation has ever seen, and now there's proof that its not just their politics. According to professors at the University of California, Mitt Romney scores in the 99th percentile of all politicians for his looks alone, far outpacing his running mate...
  • Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity Get Warp Speed Extension

    10/13/2012 11:15:49 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 59 replies
    Dailytech ^ | October 12, 2012 2:07 PM | Jason Mick (Blog)
    New theory describes faster than light travel, could explain CERN's results Some of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, including Albert Einstein, consider the speed of light a sort of universal "speed limit".  But over the past couple decades physicists theorized that it should be possible to break this law and get away with it -- to travel faster than the speed of light. I. CERN Results Potentially Described One of several possible routes to faster-than-light travel was potentially demonstrated when researchers at CERN, the European physics organization known for maintaining the Large Hadron Collider, sent high-energy particles through the Earth's crust from Geneva, Switzerland...
  • Manipulators of the Quantum Realm Reap Nobel Glory

    10/09/2012 11:43:46 AM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 October 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Light touch. Serge Haroche and David Wineland (right) won the Nobel for their work manipulating the quantum states of individual atoms. Credit: CNRS and NIST The past couple of decades have witnessed a sea change in quantum physics. Previously, scientists relied on the strange rules of quantum theory mainly to explain the odd natural behavior of masses of atoms and other quantum particles such as photons. Increasingly, however, physicists are exploiting those rules to create delicate quantum states of individual particles and to do novel things with them. This year's Nobel Prize in physics honors two experimenters...
  • The Nobel Prize in Physics 2012 Haroche, David J. Wineland (France and USA)

    10/09/2012 3:40:47 AM PDT · by AdmSmith · 28 replies
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences ^ | 9 oct 2012 | The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2012 to Serge Haroche Collège de France and Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France and David J. Wineland National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems" Particle control in a quantum world Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland have independently invented and developed methods for measuring and manipulating individual particles while preserving their quantum-mechanical nature, in ways that were previously thought unattainable.
  • 'Star Trek' fusion impulse engine in the works (Travel to Mars in 6 Weeks)

    10/03/2012 3:52:03 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 62 replies
    Cnet ^ | 10/2.2012 | Cnet
    There's a hierarchy of "Star Trek" inventions we would like to see become reality. We already have voice-controlled computers and communicators in the form of smartphones. A working Holodeck is under development. Now, how about we get some impulse engines for our starships? The University of Alabama in Huntsville's Aerophysics Research Center, NASA, Boeing, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are collaborating on a project to produce nuclear fusion impulse rocket engines. It's no warp drive, but it would get us around the galaxy a lot quicker than current technologies. According to Txchnologist, the scientists are hoping to make impulse drive...
  • Quantum causal relations: A causes B causes A

    10/03/2012 4:33:24 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 48 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | 10/2/12
    One of the most deeply rooted concepts in science and in our everyday life is causality; the idea that events in the present are caused by events in the past and, in turn, act as causes for what happens in the future. If an event A is a cause of an effect B, then B cannot be a cause of A. Now theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Université Libre de Bruxelles have shown that in quantum mechanics it is possible to conceive situations in which a single event can be both, a cause and an effect...
  • Warp Drive May Be More Feasible Than Thought, Scientists Say

    09/17/2012 10:28:10 AM PDT · by justlurking · 144 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 2012-09-17 | Clara Moskowitz
    A warp drive to achieve faster-than-light travel — a concept popularized in television's Star Trek — may not be as unrealistic as once thought, scientists say. A warp drive would manipulate space-time itself to move a starship, taking advantage of a loophole in the laws of physics that prevent anything from moving faster than light. A concept for a real-life warp drive was suggested in 1994 by Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre, however subsequent calculations found that such a device would require prohibitive amounts of energy. Now physicists say that adjustments can be made to the proposed warp drive that would...
  • Atomic bond types discernible in single-molecule images

    09/14/2012 7:55:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13 September 2012 | Jason Palmer
    A pioneering team from IBM in Zurich has published single-molecule images so detailed that the type of atomic bonds between their atoms can be discerned. The same team took the first-ever single-molecule image in 2009 and more recently published images of a molecule shaped like the Olympic rings. The new work opens up the prospect of studying imperfections in the "wonder material" graphene or plotting where electrons go during chemical reactions. The images are published in Science. The team, which included French and Spanish collaborators, used a variant of a technique called atomic force microscopy, or AFM. AFM uses a...
  • Are Democrats Really the "Pro-Science" Party?

    09/10/2012 2:29:35 PM PDT · by neverdem · 93 replies
    realclearpolitics.com ^ | September 10, 2012 | Alex Berezow and Hank Campbell
    A narrative has developed over the past several years that the Republican Party is anti-science. Recently, thanks to the ignorant remarks about rape made by Rep. Todd Akin, the Democrats have seized the opportunity to remind us that they are the true champions of science in America. But is it really true? No. As we thoroughly detail in our new book, "Science Left Behind," Democrats are willing to throw science under the bus for any number of pet ideological causes – including anything from genetic modification to vaccines. Consider California’s Proposition 37, which would require genetically modified food to carry...
  • Speed of light may have changed recently

    06/30/2004 1:35:28 PM PDT · by NukeMan · 263 replies · 998+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 6/30/04 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    Speed of light may have changed recently 19:00 30 June 04 The speed of light, one of the most sacrosanct of the universal physical constants, may have been lower as recently as two billion years ago - and not in some far corner of the universe, but right here on Earth. The controversial finding is turning up the heat on an already simmering debate, especially since it is based on re-analysis of old data that has long been used to argue for exactly the opposite: the constancy of the speed of light and other constants. A varying speed of light...
  • Galaxy Cluster Stuns Scientists—Supermassive and Spewing Out Stars

    08/15/2012 11:05:48 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 29 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | August 15, 2012 | Andrew Fazekas
    It seemed too good to be true: a superbright newfound galaxy cluster possibly more massive than any other known, forging fresh stars nearly a thousand times faster than normal.
  • Undead galaxy cluster spews 700 zombie baby stars A YEAR

    08/16/2012 10:08:59 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 19 replies
    The Register ^ | 16th August 2012 11:19 GMT | Brid-Aine Parnell
    Astroboffins have spotted a galaxy cluster that's breaking all the cosmic rules, including coming back to life to spawn stars at an enormous rate. The Phoenix cluster is spewing out the celestial bodies at the highest rate ever observed for the middle of a galaxy cluster; it's the most powerful producer of X-rays of any known cluster; it's one of the most massive of its kind; and the rate of hot gas cooling in the central regions is the largest ever observed. According to the scientists, the cluster is "experiencing a massive starburst" that's forming the equivalent of 740 Suns...
  • LHC Particle Soup Is the Hottest Thing Mankind Ever Made (CERN Scientists at work)

    08/15/2012 7:00:33 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 14 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | Aug 14, 2012 2:20 PM | Mario Aguilar
    Scientists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider say they just temporarily created the hottest man-made temperature by colliding two lead ions. According to a source working on the project, the collision sprung loose a plasma "soup" of sub-atomic gluons and quarks at an estimated temperature of 5.5-trillion-degrees Celsius. We won't know just how hot the plasma was for at least a few weeks because the measurements are very delicate and have to be converted to degrees. The consensus seems to be that it will shatter the previous record, which was about 4 trillion degrees.The craziest thing is that this might not...
  • Glaswegian scientists snap entangled particles --- Next: the Schrödinger's LOL-cat blog?

    08/10/2012 10:09:26 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies
    The Register ^ | 10th August 2012 00:15 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A group of physicists at the University of Glasgow is claiming a first: taking photos of entangled photons. In this paper in Nature (hooray for free access!), they explain that their 201 x 201 pixel images captured around 2,500 different entangled quantum states. The entangled photons were imaged using different lens configurations to capture correlations of position and momentum – the characteristics (to shorthand Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle) that mutually preclude excessive knowledge about a given quantum system. From the 100,000 images taken by their setup (pictured*), the scientists say they were able to observe 2,500 states which they described as...
  • UM Scientists Hear ‘Scream’ As Star Is Devoured By Black Hole

    08/07/2012 3:26:22 PM PDT · by null and void · 40 replies
    CBS Detroit ^ | August 6, 2012 6:16 PM | Matt Roush
    ANN ARBOR — Astrophysicists have detected, for the first time, the oscillating signal that heralds the last gasps of a star falling victim to a previously dormant supermassive black hole. Led by researchers at the University of Michigan, the team documented the event with the Suzaku and XMM-Newton orbiting X-ray telescopes. These instruments picked up semi-regular blips in the light from a numerically-named galaxy 3.9 billion light years away in the northern constellation Draco the dragon. The blips, scientifically known as “quasiperiodic oscillations,” occurred steadily every 200 seconds, but occasionally disappeared. Such signals have often been detected at smaller black...
  • How Black Holes Shape the Galaxies, Stars and Planets around Them

    07/26/2012 7:17:56 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 7/17/12 | Caleb Scharf
    The matter-eating beast at the center of the Milky Way may actually account for Earth's existence and habitabilityAdapted from Gravity’s Engines: How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos, by Caleb ScharfOur existence in this place, this microscopic corner of the cosmos, is fleeting. with utter disregard for our wants and needs, nature plays out its grand acts on scales of space and time that are truly hard to grasp. Perhaps all that we can look to for real solace is our endless capacity to ask questions and seek answers about the place we find ourselves...
  • Behind the Higgs: A primer on a long-sought boson

    07/25/2012 4:14:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Science News ^ | July 28th, 2012 | Tom Siegfried
    In 1964, physicist Peter Higgs of the University of Edinburgh proposed that the infant universe (as in, perhaps a trillionth of a second old) experienced... a phase transition. In much the way an iron bar can suddenly become a magnet when cooled below a certain temperature, space itself acquired a new feature. Instead of a magnetic field, space was filled with a new forcelike field -- since named for Higgs. Other physicists worked out similar scenarios at about the same time, and later work showed how the Higgs phase transition could explain the distinct identities of two of nature's basic...
  • Notes from a parallel universe

    04/29/2002 6:51:57 PM PDT · by lds23 · 84 replies · 730+ views
    Discover ^ | April 2002 | Jennifer Kahn
    Notes from a parallel universe Inside the X-files at the University of California at Berkeley, the line between theory and fantasy, science and supposition, starts to dissolve. The authors of these dissertations are obsessed—and scientists are nearly as obsessed with them Eleven years ago Eugene Sittampalam was sitting in a hotel room on the Libyan coast when he stumbled, as if by fate, on the unified field theory of physics. "I was on an engineering project at the time, with hardly any social life," he says. "I would retire to my room after dinner. I would switch on the radio,...
  • Russian maths genius may turn down $1m prize [solved the Poincaré conjecture]

    03/28/2010 1:40:12 AM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 68 replies · 2,302+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 3/27/2010 | Andrew Osborn in Moscow and Olga Krepysheva in St. Petersburg
    Inside the world of Grigory Perelman: the man who solved the world's toughest maths problem proves to be a puzzle himself. He has been called "the cleverest man in the world" and shook academia to its foundations when he announced he had solved a fiendish mathematical problem that had baffled the planet's best brains for a century. Yet Grigory Perelman, a 43-year-old Russian mathematician, has consciously spurned plaudits and wealth to subsist like a hermit. He lives in a 2-bedroom flat with his elderly mother in a dilapidated Soviet-era tower block in St. Petersburg, while neighbours complain that his own...