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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Beam of darkness makes objects invisible from a distance

    12/16/2013 12:31:37 PM PST · by listenhillary · 46 replies
    Wired.co.UK ^ | December 16, 2013 | Olivia Solon
    A research team from the University of Singapore has developed a device that can make objects invisible by bathing them in a beam of darkness. The system takes the conventional approach to optics -- which generally aims to make images as sharp and clear as possible -- and turns it completely on its head. Usually imaging systems focus light into a pattern known as a point spreading function, which consists of a spiked central region of high intensity (the main lobe) surrounded by a concentric region of lower intensity light and a higher intensity lobe after this. In order to...
  • Forget Big Bang-'Rainbow Gravity' theory-universe has NO beginning & stretches out infinitely

    12/15/2013 1:55:43 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | December 11, 2013 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    To think that our universe is 13.8 billion years old is incredible enough. But now researchers are proposing that the universe stretches back into time infinitely with no singular point where it started. The idea is one possible result of something known as ‘rainbow gravity’- a theory that is not widely accepted among physicists, though many say the idea is interesting. The theory’s name comes from a suggestion that gravity's effect on the cosmos is felt differently by varying wavelengths of light, which can be found in the colours of the rainbow. The theory was proposed 10 years ago in...
  • Why Our Universe is Not a Hologram

    12/13/2013 1:24:43 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on December 13, 2013 | Brian Koberlein
    There’s a web post from the Nature website going around entitled “Simulations back up theory that Universe is a hologram.” It’s an interesting concept, but suffice it to say, the universe is not a hologram, certainly not in the way people think of holograms. So what is this “holographic universe” thing? ... From this you get a headline implying that we live in a hologram. On twitter, Ethan Siegel proposed a more sensible headline: “Important idea of string theory shown not to be mathematically inconsistent in one particular way”.
  • Could the universe collapse TODAY? Physicists claim that risk is ‘more likely than ever’…

    12/14/2013 11:01:55 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 62 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 10:58 EST, 14 December 2013 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    The universe could be about to collapse, and everything in it—including us—will be compressed into a small, hard ball. The process may already have started somewhere in our cosmos and is eating away at the rest of the universe, according to theoretical physicists. The mind-bending concept has been around for a while, but now researchers in Denmark claim they have proven it is possible with mathematical equations. …
  • New superconductor theory may revolutionize electrical engineering

    12/08/2013 6:38:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 28 replies
    Phys.org ^ | December 6, 2013 | Bill Steele
    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a frustratingly varied catalog of odd behavior, such as electrons that arrange themselves into stripes or refuse to arrange themselves symmetrically around atoms. Now two physicists propose that such behaviors – and superconductivity itself – can all be traced to a single starting point, and they explain why there are so many variations. This theory might be a step toward new, higher-temperature superconductors that would revolutionize electrical engineering with more efficient motors and generators and lossless power transmission. -snip- Most subatomic particles have a tiny magnetic field – a property physicists call "spin" – and electrical resistance...
  • 4-year-old genius has same IQ as Einstein

    12/14/2013 3:11:11 PM PST · by Star Traveler · 153 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | December 13, 2013 | Amanda Stringfellow
    Sherwyn Sarabi scored an IQ of 160, just like Albert Einstein, Bill Gates, and Stephen Hawking. The British boy is already studying at the level of a 9-year-old and has read over 190 books. A four-year-old boy has stunned psychologists—after intelligence tests revealed him to have the same IQ as Einstein. Sherwyn Sarabi has tested off the scale for intelligence—scoring an IQ of 160—the highest mark on the test. It's the same score that experts believe scientist Einstein had, as well as being identical to that of Bill Gates and Stephen Hawking. Sherwyn from Barnsley, Yorks, started school two years...
  • IBM’s Scientific Breakthrough Could Enable Lower-Cost High-Performance Big Data Systems.

    12/12/2013 9:31:25 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    Xbitlabs ^ | 12/10/2013 11:55 PM | Anton Shilov
    For the first time, scientists at IBM Research have demonstrated a complex quantum mechanical phenomenon known as Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), using a luminescent polymer (plastic) similar to the materials in light emitting displays used in many of today's smartphones. Applications could include energy-efficient lasers and optical switches, critical components for future computer systems processing Big Data Quantum Phenomenon Could Mean Breakthrough for Exascale Systems This discovery has potential applications in developing novel optoelectronic devices including energy-efficient lasers and ultra-fast optical switches – critical components for powering future computer systems to process massive Big Data workloads. The use of a...
  • Update on the universe: Top scientists gather in Dallas to dissect space, matter, time

    12/07/2013 8:34:53 PM PST · by gooblah · 27 replies
    Dallas Morning News ^ | December 7 2013 | Anna Kuchment
    An idea hatched around a Dallas swimming pool 50 years ago has blossomed into one of the world’s most prestigious scientific conferences. Starting Sunday, more than 450 experts on gravity, black holes and the newly discovered Higgs boson — the subject of this year’s Nobel Prize in physics — will gather at the Fairmont Hotel in downtown Dallas to discuss the newest findings and most pressing mysteries in their fields
  • Where Does Gravity Come From?

    12/05/2013 5:18:10 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | December 5, 2013 | Nancy Atkinson on
    The problem is that our understanding of both particle physics and the geometry of gravity is incomplete. “Having gone from basically philosophical understandings of why things fall to mathematical descriptions of how things accelerate down inclines from Galileo, to Kepler’s equations describing planetary motion to Newton’s formulation of the Laws of Physics, to Einstein’s formulations of relativity, we’ve been building and building a more comprehensive view of gravity. But we’re still not complete,” said Dr. Pamela Gay. “We know that there still needs to be some way to unite quantum mechanics and gravity and actually be able to write down...
  • Could Particle ‘Spooky Action’ Define The Nature Of Gravity?

    12/05/2013 5:24:00 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | December 5, 2013 | Elizabeth Howell on
    Sonner then set about to create quarks to see if he could watch what happens when two are entangled with each other. Using an electric field, he was able to catch pairs of particles coming out of a vacuum environment with a few “transient” particles in it. - Once he caught the particles, he mapped them in terms of space-time (four-dimensional space). Note: gravity is believed to be the fifth dimension because it can bend space-time [5th Dimension?], as you can see in these images of galaxies below. - Sonner then tried to figure out what would happen in the...
  • ‘Spooky action’ builds a wormhole between ‘entangled’ particles

    12/04/2013 8:21:43 AM PST · by Red Badger · 85 replies
    http://www.washington.edu ^ | December 3, 2013 | Vince Stricherz
    Quantum entanglement, a perplexing phenomenon of quantum mechanics that Albert Einstein once referred to as “spooky action at a distance,” could be even spookier than Einstein perceived. Physicists at the University of Washington and Stony Brook University in New York believe the phenomenon might be intrinsically linked with wormholes, hypothetical features of space-time that in popular science fiction can provide a much-faster-than-light shortcut from one part of the universe to another. But here’s the catch: One couldn’t actually travel, or even communicate, through these wormholes, said Andreas Karch, a UW physics professor. Quantum entanglement occurs when a pair or a...
  • How NASA might build its very first warp drive

    11/29/2013 7:24:42 PM PST · by EveningStar · 115 replies
    io9 ^ | November 26, 2013 | George Dvorsky
    A few months ago, physicist Harold White stunned the aeronautics world when he announced that he and his team at NASA had begun work on the development of a faster-than-light warp drive. His proposed design, an ingenious re-imagining of an Alcubierre Drive, may eventually result in an engine that can transport a spacecraft to the nearest star in a matter of weeks — and all without violating Einstein's law of relativity. We contacted White at NASA and asked him to explain how this real life warp drive could actually work.
  • Faster Than the Speed of Light?

    11/29/2013 7:58:18 PM PST · by Star Traveler · 65 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 22, 2013 | Danny Hakim
    HOUSTON — Beyond the security gate at the Johnson Space Center’s 1960s-era campus here, inside a two-story glass and concrete building with winding corridors, there is a floating laboratory. Harold G. White, a physicist and advanced propulsion engineer at NASA, beckoned toward a table full of equipment there on a recent afternoon: a laser, a camera, some small mirrors, a ring made of ceramic capacitors and a few other objects. He and other NASA engineers have been designing and redesigning these instruments, with the goal of using them to slightly warp the trajectory of a photon, changing the distance it...
  • Novel X-ray device developed

    11/27/2013 1:44:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 11-24-2013 | Provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Using a compact but powerful laser, a research team at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has developed a new way to generate synchrotron X-rays. Although the high quality of synchrotron X-rays make them ideal for research ranging from the structure of matter to advanced medical images, access to the technology has been limited until now. Most traditional synchrotron X-ray devices are gigantic and costly, available only at a few sites around the world. As reported in this week's issue of the top-ranked optics journal Nature Photonics, researchers at UNL's Extreme Light Laboratory developed a novel method to generate research-quality X-rays using...
  • Mathematicians Are Making Major Breakthroughs In The Understanding Of Prime Numbers

    11/23/2013 5:57:05 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 74 replies
    businessinsider.com ^ | Nov. 21, 2013, 3:07 PM | Andy Kiersz
     Most mathematicians have a sense that the twin primes conjecture should be true — the positioning of the prime numbers appear to be more or less random, even though on average the gaps between primes get larger, and if one has an infinitely long list of random odd numbers, we should have an infinite collection of pairs in our list. If at some point, prime numbers are always more than two numbers away from each other, we have a non-random aspect to their distribution that goes against this intuition.
  • Scientists witness massive gamma-ray burst, don't understand it

    11/22/2013 7:53:51 AM PST · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | November 21, 2013 | By Pete Spotts, Staff writer
    An exploded star some 3.8 billion light-years away is forcing scientists to overhaul much of what they thought they knew about gamma-ray bursts – intense blasts of radiation triggered, in this case, by a star tens of times more massive than the sun that exhausted its nuclear fuel, exploded, then collapsed to form a black hole. Last April, gamma rays from the blast struck detectors in gamma-ray observatories orbiting Earth, triggering a frenzy of space- and ground-based observations. Many of them fly in the face of explanations researchers have developed during the past 30 years for the processes driving the...
  • Ramesh Raskar: Imaging at a trillion frames per second

    11/22/2013 4:04:45 PM PST · by BulletBobCo · 26 replies
    Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography, a new type of imaging so fast it visualizes the world one trillion frames per second, so detailed it shows light itself in motion. This technology may someday be used to build cameras that can look “around” corners or see inside the body without X-rays. Photography is about creating images by recording light. At the MIT media lab, professor Ramesh Raskar and his team members have invented a camera that can photograph light itself as it moves at, well, the speed of light.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Heavy Black Hole Jets in 4U1630-47

    11/20/2013 3:05:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | November 20, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What are black hole jets made of? Many black holes in stellar systems are surely surrounded by disks of gas and plasma gravitationally pulled from a close binary star companion. Some of this material, after approaching the black hole, ends up being expelled from the star system in powerful jets emanating from the poles of the spinning black hole. Recent evidence indicates that these jets are composed not only electrons and protons, but also the nuclei of heavy elements such as iron and nickel. The discovery was made in system 4U1630-47 using CSIRO’s Compact Array of radio telescopes in...
  • Scientists proud of dark matter study that turns up nothing

    11/12/2013 6:08:01 PM PST · by Tailgunner Joe · 28 replies
    upi.com ^ | October 31, 2013 | Caroline Lee
    Scientists at the Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota running the biggest, most sensitive dark matter detector yet released its first round of results yesterday -- and they found nothing. The Large Underground Xenon dark matter experiment, or LUX, consists of a vat of 368 kilograms of liquid xenon to minus 110 degrees Celsius, surrounded by a tank of water. LUX sits 4,850 feet underground at the old mine, shielded from cosmic rays. An international team of researchers watched for three months to see if any WIMPS -- weakly interacting massive particles -- would pass through the rock and reveal...
  • This quasar should not exist -- and yet it does

    11/09/2013 11:07:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    io9 ^ | November 9th, 2013 | George Dvorsky
    Astronomers from York University in Canada have identified an undocumented type of quasar where gas appears to be getting sucked into a black hole. This may not sound surprising, but current theories say that isn't supposed to happen. Quasars are hyperactive and extremely bright discs of hot gas that surround supermassive black holes. They're also known as galactic nucleuses. The Milky Way has one at its center. All the junk that's rapidly spinning down the drain hole forms a compact disc with a radius that's larger than Earth's orbit around the Sun and a temperature that's hotter than the surface...