Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Are you scientifically literate? Take our quiz

    02/22/2012 8:08:53 PM PST · by P.O.E. · 63 replies
    CSM ^ | 12/11/12 | Eoin O'Carroll, Staff
  • Single-atom transistor is ‘end of Moore’s Law’ and ‘beginning of quantum computing’

    02/22/2012 8:43:48 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Kurzweil ^ | 02/22/2012
    A controllable transistor engineered from a single phosphorus atom. The atom, shown here in the center of an image from a computer model, sits in a channel in a silicon crystal. The atomic-sized transistor and wires might allow researchers to control gated qubits of information in future quantum computers. (Credit: Purdue University)The smallest transistor ever built has been created using a single phosphorous atom by an international team of researchers at the University of New South Wales, Purdue University and the University of Melbourne.The latest Intel chip, the “Sandy Bridge,” uses a manufacturing process to place 2.3 billion transistors 32...
  • The Boy Who Played With Fusion

    02/21/2012 9:07:37 AM PST · by justlurking · 68 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 2012-02-14 | Tom Clynes
    Propulsion,” the nine-year-old says as he leads his dad through the gates of the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. “I just want to see the propulsion stuff.” A young woman guides their group toward a full-scale replica of the massive Saturn V rocket that brought America to the moon. As they duck under the exhaust nozzles, Kenneth Wilson glances at his awestruck boy and feels his burden beginning to lighten. For a few minutes, at least, someone else will feed his son’s boundless appetite for knowledge. Then Taylor raises his hand, not with a question but an...
  • Researchers Create Single-Atom Transistor

    02/20/2012 11:43:03 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 33 replies · 2+ views
    HardOCP ^ | Monday February 20, 2012 | Steve
    For those of you that haven't seen this yet, Researchers from Purdue, the University of Melbourne and the University of New South Wales have created a working transistor from a single atom. Thanks to Robert for the link. We have fabricated a single-atom transistor in which a single phosphorus atom is positioned between highly doped source and drain leads with a lateral spatial accuracy of ±1 atomic lattice spacing. We demonstrate that we are able to register source, drain and gate contacts to the individual donor atom and observe well-controlled transitions for 0, 1 and 2 electron states, in agreement...
  • Extraordinary Toroidal Vortices

    02/18/2012 4:32:57 PM PST · by gorush · 24 replies · 1+ views
    YouTube ^ | 2-12-10 | Evasius
    Extraordinary and beautiful examples of toroidal vortices produced by dolphins, beluga whales, humpback whales, volcanoes, hydrogen bombs, and man. A toroidal vortex, also called a vortex ring, is a region of rotating fluid moving through the same or different fluid where the flow pattern takes on a toroidal (doughnut) shape. The movement of the fluid is about the poloidal or circular axis of the doughnut, in a twisting vortex motion. Examples of this phenomenon are a smoke ring or a microburst. Vortex rings were first mathematically analysed by the German physicist Hermann von Helmholtz, in his paper of 1867 On...
  • 10-Year-Old Accidentally Creates New Molecule in Science Class

    02/17/2012 3:59:47 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 1+ views
    Popular Science ^ | February 3, 2012 | Dan Nosowitz & The Mary Sue via Gizmodo
    Clara Lazen is the discoverer of tetranitratoxycarbon, a molecule constructed of, obviously, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon. It's got some interesting possible properties, ranging from use as an explosive to energy storage. Lazen is listed as the co-author of a recent paper on the molecule. But that's not what's so interesting and inspiring about this story. What's so unusual here is that Clara Lazen is a ten-year-old fifth-grader in Kansas City, MO. Kenneth Boehr, Clara's science teacher, handed out the usual ball-and-stick models used to visualize simple molecules to his fifth-grade class. But Clara put the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms...
  • MIT suggests new physical model for condensed matter

    02/09/2012 8:49:53 PM PST · by Kevmo · 39 replies
    Arxiv.org and Vortex-L ^ | Feb 8 2012 | David Ledin
    [Vo]: MIT suggest new physical model for condensed matter The Vorts have some great comments about this theory. http://www.mail-archive.com/vortex-l@eskimo.com/msg63015.html David ledin Tue, 07 Feb 2012 07:40:12 -0800 MIT suggest new physical model for condensed matter to explain many observations of anomalies in condensed matter systems. they named Fleischmann , Pons and Piantelli but not rossi . http://arxiv.org/pdf/1201.4377.pdf ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.mail-archive.com/vortex-l@eskimo.com/msg63024.html Mark Iverson-ZeroPoint Tue, 07 Feb 2012 10:07:44 -0800 The key phrase in the abstract is: "In the resulting model, there appears a new term in which nuclear transitions are coupled to lattice vibrations." I wonder if Hagelstein has been reading...
  • Physicists 'record' magnetic breakthrough

    02/07/2012 10:44:06 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 20 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 2/7/12
    An international team of scientists has demonstrated a revolutionary new way of magnetic recording which will allow information to be processed hundreds of times faster than by current hard drive technology. The researchers found they could record information using only heat - a previously unimaginable scenario. They believe this discovery will not only make future magnetic recording devices faster, but more energy-efficient too. The results of the research, which was led by the University of York's Department of Physics, are reported in the February edition of Nature Communications. York physicist Thomas Ostler said: "Instead of using a magnetic field to...
  • University of Bologna Terminates Relationship With Rossi

    01/24/2012 4:21:51 AM PST · by Johnny B. · 20 replies
    New Energy Times ^ | 1/24/2012 | Steven B. Krivit
    Andrea Rossi, an Italian man who claims to have invented a practical low-energy nuclear reaction device, lost an ideal opportunity to have his device tested and evaluated by a prestigious University for lack of funds. Last summer, Rossi said he had started a research contract with the University of Bologna to allow its researchers to study his “Energy Catalyzer.” But that never happened. Today, Dario Braga, director of scientific research at the University told New Energy Times that the University waited long enough. It terminated the contract because Rossi did not fulfill his agreement to make the first progress payment....
  • 5 of the biggest unsolved mysteries in physics

    01/31/2012 2:06:57 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 69 replies · 1+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 1/31/12 | Tecca - Today in Tech
    The mysteries of the universe are as vast and wide as existence itself. Throughout history, mankind has searched and struggled to find the answers tucked away inside the universe and everything we see around us. .. True, we have yet to come up with the answers to life, the universe, and everything — but oh do we have questions! Solving these mysteries may help to explain not only the creation of the universe, but also how it works, why it works, and possibly how it will end. 1. The Higgs boson The Higgs boson is a hypothetical particle whose accompanying...
  • California Researchers Hoping To Reveal Secrets of Anti-Gravity

    01/30/2012 5:38:51 PM PST · by dila813 · 27 replies · 1+ views
    Redorbit ^ | January 30, 2012 | Redorbit
    A team of researchers from the University of California, Riverside (UCR) say they are close to determining whether or not anti-matter exerts a sort of “anti-gravity” in much the same what that ordinary matter exerts regular gravity. In an article published Friday, BBC News reports that, while it is well known that normal matter attracts all other matter in the universe, scientists currently do not know if anti-matter would attract other matter, or repel it.
  • NEWT’S MOONBASE Could Provide Enough Helium-3 to Power ENTIRE US For Years

    01/28/2012 9:07:59 AM PST · by Hojczyk · 53 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | January 28,2012 | Jim Hoft
    Newt Gingrich told Floridians this week that that under his administration the US would have the first permanent base on the moon. An American moon base could provide America with enough Helium-3 to provide for all of country’s energy needs Nations and private companies are racing to be the first to scout the moon for Helium 3, a rare gas which could make almost unlimited, clean fusion energy a reality. Some experts estimate there a millions of tons in lunar soil — and that a single Space-Shuttle load would power the entire United States for a year. Both China and...
  • 'Starbursts' and black holes lead to biggest galaxies

    01/25/2012 2:08:21 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 21 replies · 2+ views
    BBC News ^ | 1/25/12 | BBC
    Frenetic star-forming activity in the early Universe is linked to the most massive galaxies in today's cosmos, new research suggests. This "starbursting" activity when the Universe was just a few billion years old appears to have been clamped off by the growth of supermassive black holes. An international team gathered hints of the mysterious "dark matter" in early galaxies to confirm the link. The findings appear in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. ... Using the 12-metre Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope in Chile, an international team led by Ryan Hickox of Dartmouth College studied the way distant galaxies from...
  • Weird World! 'Oozing' Alien Planet Is a Super-Earth Wonder [ 55 Cancri e ]

    01/21/2012 5:43:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | Friday, January 20, 2012 | SPACE.com Staff
    A new look at an alien planet that orbits extremely close to its parent star suggests that the rocky world might not be a scorching hot wasteland, as was thought. In fact, the planet may actually be stranger and wetter than astronomers ever imagined. The exotic planet 55 Cancri e is a relatively close alien planet, just 40 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Cancer (The Crab). The super-dense world circles so close to its host star that it takes a mere 18 hours to complete one orbital lap. Using our solar system for comparison, 55 Cancri e is...
  • New Storage Device Is Very Small, at 12 Atoms

    01/15/2012 10:26:09 PM PST · by neverdem · 17 replies
    NY Times ^ | anuary 12, 2012 | JOHN MARKOFF
    SAN JOSE, Calif. — Researchers at I.B.M. have stored and retrieved digital 1s and 0s from an array of just 12 atoms, pushing the boundaries of the magnetic storage of information to the edge of what is possible. The findings, being reported Thursday in the journal Science, could help lead to a new class of nanomaterials for a generation of memory chips and disk drives that will not only have greater capabilities than the current silicon-based computers but will consume significantly less power. And they may offer a new direction for research in quantum computing. “Magnetic materials are extremely useful...
  • Almost Perfect: Michigan Tech Researcher Nears Creation of Superlens

    01/10/2012 9:31:31 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 17 replies
    A superlens would let you see a virus in a drop of blood and open the door to better and cheaper electronics. It might, says Durdu Guney, make ultra-high-resolution microscopes as commonplace as cameras in our cell phones.No one has yet made a superlens, also known as a perfect lens, though people are trying. Optical lenses are limited by the nature of light, the so-called diffraction limit, so even the best won’t usually let us see objects smaller than 200 nanometers across, about the size of the smallest bacterium. Scanning electron microscopes can capture objects that are much smaller,...
  • Any other fans out there of "Fabric of the Cosmos?"

    01/07/2012 4:45:46 AM PST · by PJ-Comix · 40 replies
    Self | January 6, 2012 | PJ-Comix
    Are there any other fans of FABRIC OF THE COSMOS out there? I found it to be perhaps the most fascinating science show ever produced. The information in the show is nothing less than stunning and definitely changed my view of the universe. Some of the information is so stunning that it is hard to comprehend. But guess what? Even physicists have a hard time getting their minds around it. And an oatmeal cookie to the first person who can post who the major backer of this series is.
  • (History changed by act of mercy?) How a four-year-old Adolf Hitler was saved from certain death ...

    01/05/2012 7:09:05 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 72 replies · 1+ views
    Daily Mail Online ^ | 6th January 2012 | Allan Hall
    Revealed: The priest who changed the course of history ... by rescuing a drowning four-year-old Hitler from death in an icy river * Future Fuhrer was plucked from certain death by boy who grew up to join the church * German newspaper from 1894 reveals incident It may be the most devastating act of mercy in history. A newspaper report chronicling how a boy of four was saved from drowning has surfaced in a German archive. The child – who historians believe could have been Adolf Hitler – was plucked from the icy waters of the River Inn in Passau,...
  • Now You See It, Now You Don't: Time Cloak Created

    01/05/2012 2:03:02 AM PST · by Captain Beyond · 50 replies
    Associated Press ^ | 1-4-2012 | Associated Press
    AP Photo/Heather Deal, Cornell University Scientists demonstrate how they have have created a new invisibility technique that doesnt just cloak an object -- like in Harry Potter books and movies -- but masks an entire event by briefly bending the speed of light around an event. In this illustratio, an art thief walks into a museum and steasl a painting without setting off laser beam alarms or even showing up on surveillance cameras. WASHINGTON – It's one thing to make an object invisible, like Harry Potter's mythical cloak. But scientists have made an entire event impossible to see. They have...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Diner at the Center of the Galaxy

    12/29/2011 9:54:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | December 30, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The monster at the center of our Galaxy is about to get fed. Recent observations by the Very Large Telescopes indicate that a cloud of gas will venture too close to the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center. The gas cloud is being disrupted, stretched out, heated up, and some of it is expected to fall into the black hole over the next two years. In this artist's illustration, what remains of the blob after a close pass to the black hole is shown in red and yellow, arching out from the gravitational death trap to its right....
  • Do old fashioned arithmetic algorithms really need to be taught any more?

    12/18/2011 10:06:54 AM PST · by no gnu taxes · 140 replies
    I'm talking about the old multiplication and long division calculation methods. I know what you are probably thinking. That I am some public school advocate, even though I was pissed as hell when my kindergarten daughter asked me if I knew the happy kwanzaa song. But are these really useful anymore? I mean you can buy a calculator for $1 that does all these things and the software developers didn't use those methods for creation of the devices. Did you even understand why these algorithms worked at the time you were taught them? Not trying to be controversial; just want...
  • The Physics of why the e-Cat's Cold Fusion Claims Collapse

    12/06/2011 6:22:41 AM PST · by Johnny B. · 98 replies · 1+ views
    "Starts with A Bang!" Blog ^ | 12/5/2011 | Dr. Ethan Siegel, Dr. Peter Thieberger
    This claim is made for two reasons: There is anomalous heat/energy being generated by the device, as evidenced by water that has been heated and/or boiled by the e-Cat. This heat is measured by outside observers and cannot be accounted for, completely, by the external power input. A sample of the claimed products of the reaction was made available, which contained some nickel powder, but about 10% of the sample was copper, claimed to be completely generated from an initial sample that was 100% nickel. Right here, this very site claimed that these results were probably faked, and now we're...
  • Theoretical Feasibility of Cold Fusion According to the BSM Supergravitation Unified Theory

    12/22/2011 3:47:53 AM PST · by Kevmo · 30 replies · 4+ views
    Vixra.org ^ | Mon, 19 Dec 2011 | Stoyan Sarg Sargoytchev
    Theoretical Feasibility of Cold Fusion According to the BSM Supergravitation Unified Theory Mon, 19 Dec 2011 New monograph is available on Cold Fusion. 26 pages excerpted Author: Stoyan Sarg Sargoytchev, York Univeristy, Toronto, Canada Source: http://vixra.org/abs/1112.0043 Discussion: http://www.ecatplanet.net/content.php?140-bsm-supergravitation PDF: http://ecatplanet.net/downloads/pdf/1112.0043v2.pdf Abstract: Advances in the field of cold fusion and the recent success of the nickel and hydrogen exothermal reaction, in which the energy release cannot be explained by a chemical process, need a deeper understanding of the nuclear reactions and, more particularly, the possibility for modification of the Coulomb barrier. The current theoretical understanding based on high temperature fusion does...
  • World's Lightest Solid Takes Inspiration From Eiffel Tower

    11/19/2011 3:40:31 PM PST · by Ancient Drive · 15 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 11/19/2011 | InnovationNewsDaily
    A metallic lattice of hair-thin pipes is now the lightest solid yet created — less dense than air, scientists revealed. The strategy used to create these intricate structures could lead to revolutionary materials of extraordinary strength and lightness, including ones made of diamond, researchers added. Ultra-lightweight materials such as foams are widely used in thermal insulation and to dampen sounds, vibrations and shocks.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Horseshoe Einstein Ring from Hubble

    12/22/2011 7:55:08 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | December 21, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's large and blue and can wrap itself around an entire galaxy? A gravitational lens mirage. Pictured above, the gravity of a luminous red galaxy (LRG) has gravitationally distorted the light from a much more distant blue galaxy. More typically, such light bending results in two discernible images of the distant galaxy, but here the lens alignment is so precise that the background galaxy is distorted into a horseshoe -- a nearly complete ring. Since such a lensing effect was generally predicted in some detail by Albert Einstein over 70 years ago, rings like this are now known as...
  • A new kind of metal in the deep Earth

    12/19/2011 9:25:52 AM PST · by decimon · 53 replies
    Carnegie Institution ^ | December 19, 2011
    Washington, D.C. -- The crushing pressures and intense temperatures in Earth's deep interior squeeze atoms and electrons so closely together that they interact very differently. With depth materials change. New experiments and supercomputer computations discovered that iron oxide undergoes a new kind of transition under deep Earth conditions. Iron oxide, FeO, is a component of the second most abundant mineral at Earth's lower mantle, ferropericlase. The finding, published in an upcoming issue of Physical Review Letters, could alter our understanding of deep Earth dynamics and the behavior of the protective magnetic field, which shields our planet from harmful cosmic rays....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Hints of Higgs from the Large Hadron Collider

    12/18/2011 8:13:12 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    NASA ^ | December 18, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why do objects have mass? To help find out, Europe's CERN has built the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the most powerful particle accelerator yet created by humans. Since 2008, the LHC smashed protons into each other with unprecedented impact speeds. The LHC is exploring the leading explanation that mass arises from ordinary particles slogging through an otherwise invisible but pervasive field of virtual Higgs particles. Were high energy colliding particles to create real Higgs bosons, the Higgs mechanism for mass creation will be bolstered. Last week, two LHC groups reported on preliminary indications that the Higgs boson might exist...
  • Particle physics is at a turning point [ Higgs boson and String Theory ]

    12/17/2011 5:02:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Nature: World View ^ | Friday, December 16, 2011 | Gordon Kane
    ...The properties and mass of the LHC's Higgs boson suggest that physicists will soon find superpartners for particles, and that we have begun to connect string theory to the real world... Physicists thought that a Higgs boson, when discovered, would take this supersymmetric form, so how have we discovered one so apparently identical to the impossible standard-model version? Working out how to interpret this could be a large step towards the underlying broader theory that will extend the standard model. One explanation could come from an unexpected source: string theory or its extension, M-theory. Contrary to what you may have...
  • Unexplained shower of apples falls from sky over town

    12/17/2011 10:07:11 AM PST · by Young Werther · 49 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | Thu, Dec 15, 2011.. | Eric Pfeiffer
    More than 100 apples mysteriously rained down upon a small British town on Monday night. The still-unexplained apple shower left 20 yards of city streets and car windshields covered in the cascading fruit just after the daily rush hour.
  • Trillion-Frame-Per-Second Video

    12/14/2011 2:27:57 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 26 replies
    MITNewsOffice ^ | Dec 12, 2011 | Video: Melanie Gonick.
    Uploaded by MITNewsOffice on Dec 12, 2011 MIT Media Lab researchers have created a new imaging system that can acquire visual data at a rate of one trillion frames per second. That's fast enough to produce a slow-motion video of light traveling through objects. Video: Melanie Gonick.
  • Quantum Computing - A Eureka Moment [Deep Thought is here]

    12/05/2011 6:33:06 PM PST · by Vince Ferrer · 64 replies · 1+ views
    University of Southern California ^ | October 21, 2011 | Gully Burns
    Last Friday, I realized the sort of place I work in: an academic Computer Science institute that bears more than a passing resemblence to the ficticious TV town of 'Eureka'. We don't have flying cars, or intelligent, rebellious, precocious attack bots, but we do have some cool stuff. Take the 128-QuBit Quantum Computer housed the ground floor of parking lot where a sandwich shop used to be, for example. This is the next generation of computers, using the superposition effects of quantum mechanics to process vastly many more states than our current 'classical' computers can accomplish. This is the sort...
  • Search for God Particle is nearly over, as CERN prepares to announce findings

    12/04/2011 6:23:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | December 1, 2011 | Nick Collins
    The Higgs boson is a theoretical particle which scientists believe gives mass to everything in the universe, and is a key component of the Standard Model of physics. While finding it in its expected form would confirm common theories on how atoms are put together, identifying a number of Higgs bosons with different masses or disproving the particle entirely would overturn many assumptions of modern physics.
  • Two Diamonds Linked by Strange Quantum Entanglement

    12/03/2011 9:19:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, December 1, 2011 | Clara Moskowitz
    Scientists have linked two diamonds in a mysterious process called entanglement that is normally only seen on the quantum scale. Entanglement is so weird that Einstein dubbed it "spooky action at a distance." It's a strange effect where one object gets connected to another so that even if they are separated by large distances, an action performed on one will affect the other. Entanglement usually occurs with subatomic particles, and was predicted by the theory of quantum mechanics, which governs the realm of the very small... Because energy must be conserved in closed systems (where there's no input of outside...
  • Supercool (water, that is)

    11/23/2011 8:15:10 PM PST · by decimon · 14 replies
    University of Utah ^ | November 23, 2011
    Utah chemists: Water doesn't have to freeze until minus 55 FahrenheitSALT LAKE CITY -- We drink water, bathe in it and we are made mostly of water, yet the common substance poses major mysteries. Now, University of Utah chemists may have solved one enigma by showing how cold water can get before it absolutely must freeze: 55 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. That's 87 degrees Fahrenheit colder than what most people consider the freezing point of water, namely, 32 F. Supercooled liquid water must become ice at minus 55 F not just because of the extreme cold, but because the molecular...
  • How ink flows, speedy neutrinos may leave LHC trails, and seeing Schroedinger's cat

    11/21/2011 9:15:07 AM PST · by decimon · 7 replies
    American Physical Society ^ | November 21, 2011
    News from the American Physical SocietyHydrodynamics of writing with inkFor millennia, writing has been the preferred way to convey information and knowledge from one generation to another. We first developed the ability to write on clay tablets with a point, and then settled on a reed pen, as preserved from 3000 BC in Egypt when it was used with papyrus. Cont... Faster-than-light neutrinos may leave trails at the LHCIs Einstein's venerated theory of special relativity challenged by neutrinos? Cont... Why it's hard to see Schroedinger's catWhy do we not see quantum physical effects in our daily lives? This question was...
  • Blocked holes can enhance rather than stop light transmission

    11/22/2011 11:39:36 AM PST · by decimon · 25 replies
    Princeton University ^ | November 22, 2011 | Steven Schultz
    Conventional wisdom would say that blocking a hole would prevent light from going through it, but Princeton University engineers have discovered the opposite to be true. A research team has found that placing a metal cap over a small hole in a metal film does not stop the light at all, but rather enhances its transmission. In an example of the extraordinary twists of physics that can occur at very small scales, electrical engineer Stephen Chou and colleagues made an array of tiny holes in a thin metal film, then blocked each hole with an opaque metal cap. When they...
  • Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos: OPERA Confirms and Submits Results, But Unease Remains

    11/19/2011 8:49:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 17 November 2011 | Edwin Cartlidge
    New high-precision tests carried out by the OPERA collaboration in Italy broadly confirm its claim, made in September, to have detected neutrinos travelling at faster than the speed of light. The collaboration today submitted its results to a journal, but some members continue to insist that further checks are needed before the result can be considered sound. OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus) measures the properties of neutrinos that are sent through the Earth from the CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, and arrive in its detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain in central Italy. On 22 September,...
  • Is the New Physics Here? Atom Smashers Get an Antimatter Surprise

    11/19/2011 7:56:00 AM PST · by decimon · 14 replies
    Live Science ^ | November 17, 2011
    The world's largest atom smasher, designed as a portal to a new view of physics, has produced its first peek at the unexpected: bits of matter that don't mirror the behavior of their antimatter counterparts. The discovery, if confirmed, could rewrite the known laws of particle physics and help explain why our universe is made mostly of matter and not antimatter. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider, the 17-mile (27 km) circular particle accelerator underground near Geneva, Switzerland, have been colliding protons at high speeds to create explosions of energy. From this energy many subatomic particles are produced. Now researchers...
  • 2nd test affirms faster-than-light particles

    11/18/2011 11:53:59 AM PST · by TN4Liberty · 105 replies
    CBSnews.com ^ | November 18, 2011 | Brian Vastag
    A second experiment at the European facility that reported subatomic particles zooming faster than the speed of light -- stunning the world of physics -- has reached the same result, scientists said late Thursday. The "positive outcome of the [second] test makes us more confident in the result," said Fernando Ferroni, president of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics, in a statement released late Thursday. Ferroni is one of 160 physicists involved in the international collaboration known as OPERA (Oscillation Project with Emulsion Tracking Apparatus) that performed the experiment. While the second experiment "has made an important test of consistency...
  • Quantum theorem shakes foundations

    11/18/2011 5:52:08 AM PST · by ShadowAce · 86 replies
    Nature ^ | 17 November 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    At the heart of the weirdness for which the field of quantum mechanics is famous is the wavefunction, a powerful but mysterious entity that is used to determine the probabilities that quantum particles will have certain properties. Now, a preprint posted online on 14 November1 reopens the question of what the wavefunction represents — with an answer that could rock quantum theory to its core. Whereas many physicists have generally interpreted the wavefunction as a statistical tool that reflects our ignorance of the particles being measured, the authors of the latest paper argue that, instead, it is physically real. “I...
  • Chalmers scientists create light from vacuum

    11/18/2011 1:19:49 PM PST · by decimon · 25 replies
    PRESS RELEASE: Scientists at Chalmers have succeeded in creating light from vacuum – observing an effect first predicted over 40 years ago. The results have been published in the journal Nature. In an innovative experiment, the scientists have managed to capture some of the photons that are constantly appearing and disappearing in the vacuum. The experiment is based on one of the most counterintuitive, yet, one of the most important principles in quantum mechanics: that vacuum is by no means empty nothingness. In fact, the vacuum is full of various particles that are continuously fluctuating in and out of existence....
  • Neutrino experiment repeat at Cern finds same result

    11/18/2011 5:58:38 AM PST · by decimon · 37 replies · 1+ views
    BBC ^ | November 18, 2011 | Jason Palmer
    The team behind the finding in September that neutrinos may travel faster than light has carried out an improved version of their experiment - and found the same result.If confirmed by other experiments, the find could undermine one of the basic principles of modern physics. Critics of the first report had said that the long bunches of neutrinos used could introduce an error into the test. The new work, posted to the Arxiv repository, used much shorter bunches. It has been submitted to the Journal of High Energy Physics, but has not yet been reviewed by the scientific community. The...
  • LHC results may solve riddle of how universe can exist

    11/15/2011 9:34:28 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 26 replies · 1+ views
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 15th November 2011 15:28 GMT | Lewis Page
    Top boffins at the Large Hadron Collider – mightiest particle-punisher and largest machine of any kind ever assembled by humanity – say that they may have uncovered a vital clue explaining one of the greatest mysteries of physics: namely, how is it that matter itself can exist? This is a mystery because the so-called Standard Model of physics calls for ordinary matter and antimatter to decay in very similar ways. Theory also says that equal amounts of antimatter and regular-type matter (such as that making up the Sun, the Earth, all the life upon it including us etc) should have...
  • World's most powerful laser to tear apart the vacuum of space

    11/01/2011 10:56:01 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 39 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 11/01/2011 | By Richard Gray, Science Correspondent
    A laser powerful enough to tear apart the fabric of space could be built in Britain as part major new scientific project that aims to answer some of the most fundamental questions about our universe. Due to follow in the footsteps of the Large Hadron Collider, the latest "big science" experiment being proposed by physicists will see the world's most powerful laser being constructed. Capable of producing a beam of light so intense that it would be equivalent to the power received by the Earth from the sun focused onto a speck smaller than a tip of a pin, scientists...
  • Exploring the last white spot on Earth

    11/10/2011 5:47:19 AM PST · by decimon · 54 replies
    Caption: This computer-generated image shows the different layers of the Earth: The outer solid crust, the viscous upper and lower mantle, the liquid outer core, and the solid inner core. Credit: ESRF Usage Restrictions: None ESRF inaugurates unique new X-ray facilityGrenoble -- Scientists will soon be exploring matter at temperatures and pressures so extreme it can only be produced for microseconds using powerful pulsed lasers. Matter in such states is present in the Earth's liquid iron core, 2500 kilometres beneath the surface, and also in elusive "warm dense matter" inside large planets like Jupiter. A new X-ray beamline ID24 at...
  • Scientists plan $1.5bn laser strong enough 'to tear the fabric of space'

    10/30/2011 6:38:40 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 59 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Oct. 30, 2011 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A laser powerful enough to tear apart the fabric of space could be built in Britain. The major scientific project will follow in the footsteps of the Large Hadron Collider and will answer questions about the universe. The laser will be capable of producing a beam of light so intense that it will be similar to the light the earth receives from the sun but focused on a speck smaller than a pin prick. Scientists say it will be so powerful they will be able to boil the very fabric of space and create a vacuum. A vacuum fizzles with...
  • Finding puts brakes on faster-than-light neutrinos

    10/21/2011 10:47:39 AM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    Nature News ^ | 20 October 2011 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    An independent experiment confirms that subatomic particles have wrong energy spectrum for superluminal travel. The claim that neutrinos can travel faster than light has been given a knock by an independent experiment. On 17 October, the Imaging Cosmic and Rare Underground Signals (ICARUS) collaboration submitted a paper1 to the preprint server arXiv.org, in which it offered a rebuttal of claims2 to have clocked subatomic particles called neutrinos travelling faster than the speed of light. The original results were published on 22 September by the Oscillation Project with Emulsion-Tracking Apparatus (OPERA) experiment. Both experiments are based at Gran Sasso National Laboratory...
  • 1 clock with 2 times

    10/19/2011 4:45:47 PM PDT · by decimon · 13 replies
    University of Vienna ^ | October 19, 2011 | Unknown
    When quantum mechanics meets general relativityThe unification of quantum mechanics and Einstein's general relativity is one of the most exciting and still open questions in modern physics. General relativity, the joint theory of gravity, space and time gives predictions that become clearly evident on a cosmic scale of stars and galaxies. Quantum effects, on the other hand, are fragile and are typically observed on small scales, e.g. when considering single particles and atoms. That is why it is very hard to test the interplay between quantum mechanics and general relativity. Now theoretical physicists led by Prof. ÄŚaslav Brukner at the...
  • Quantum levitating (locking) video goes viral

    10/19/2011 7:01:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 18 October 2011 | Bob Yirka
    A video created by researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel has the Internet buzzing. Though rather simple, it just looks really cool, hence all the attention. It’s a demonstration of quantum locking, though to non-science buffs, it looks more like science fiction come to life. In the video a disc, obviously frozen due to the vapor rising from its surface hovers over a surface. This is nothing new of course, everyone’s seen it in science class. What is new is that when the demonstrator turns the disc, it stays hovered at that angle. This is in contrast to the...
  • Seeing Value in Ignorance, College Expects Its Physicists to Teach Poetry

    10/18/2011 9:35:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 16, 2011 | Alan Schwarz
    Sarah Benson last encountered college mathematics 20 years ago in an undergraduate algebra class. Her sole experience teaching math came in the second grade, when the first graders needed help with their minuses. And yet Ms. Benson, with a Ph.D. in art history and a master's degree in comparative literature, stood at the chalkboard drawing parallelograms, constructing angles and otherwise dismembering Euclid's Proposition 32 the way a biology professor might treat a water frog. Her students cared little about her inexperience. As for her employers, they did not mind, either: they had asked her to teach formal geometry expressly because...