Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Notes from a parallel universe

    04/29/2002 6:51:57 PM PDT · by lds23 · 84 replies · 730+ views
    Discover ^ | April 2002 | Jennifer Kahn
    Notes from a parallel universe Inside the X-files at the University of California at Berkeley, the line between theory and fantasy, science and supposition, starts to dissolve. The authors of these dissertations are obsessed—and scientists are nearly as obsessed with them Eleven years ago Eugene Sittampalam was sitting in a hotel room on the Libyan coast when he stumbled, as if by fate, on the unified field theory of physics. "I was on an engineering project at the time, with hardly any social life," he says. "I would retire to my room after dinner. I would switch on the radio,...
  • Russian maths genius may turn down $1m prize [solved the Poincaré conjecture]

    03/28/2010 1:40:12 AM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 68 replies · 2,302+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 3/27/2010 | Andrew Osborn in Moscow and Olga Krepysheva in St. Petersburg
    Inside the world of Grigory Perelman: the man who solved the world's toughest maths problem proves to be a puzzle himself. He has been called "the cleverest man in the world" and shook academia to its foundations when he announced he had solved a fiendish mathematical problem that had baffled the planet's best brains for a century. Yet Grigory Perelman, a 43-year-old Russian mathematician, has consciously spurned plaudits and wealth to subsist like a hermit. He lives in a 2-bedroom flat with his elderly mother in a dilapidated Soviet-era tower block in St. Petersburg, while neighbours complain that his own...
  • The Big Bang Never Happened

    03/07/2011 1:44:47 PM PST · by wendy1946 · 133 replies
    YouTube ^ | 6/9/09 | Randall Meyers
    In nine parts on YouTubePart 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5Part 6Part 7Part 8Part 9 A spectacular exposition featuring heavyweights in astronomy, mathematics, plasma physics, cosmology etc. including Halton Arp, Tony Peratt, Eric Lerner, Fred Hoyle and a number of others, and yet comprehensible to the educated layman. The "big bang" which we've heard about all our lives turns out to be junk physics.
  • Misconceptions about the Big Bang

    02/24/2005 3:54:37 AM PST · by PatrickHenry · 222 replies · 4,346+ views
    Scientific American ^ | March 2005 | Charles H. Lineweaver and Tamara M. Davis
    Baffled by the expansion of the universe? You're not alone. Even astronomers frequently get it wrong. The expansion of the universe may be the most important fact we have ever discovered about our origins. You would not be reading this article if the universe had not expanded. Human beings would not exist. Cold molecular things such as life-forms and terrestrial planets could not have come into existence unless the universe, starting from a hot big bang, had expanded and cooled. The formation of all the structures in the universe, from galaxies and stars to planets and Scientific American articles, has...
  • Fear of black hole machine triggers threats to researchers

    09/06/2008 1:07:57 PM PDT · by mainestategop · 81 replies · 313+ views
    worldnetdaily ^ | 9/6/08 | Drew Zahn
    Scientists preparing to fire up the world's largest atom smasher are being flooded with phone calls and emails – even death threats – from people worried that the Large Hadron Collider, when activated, will obliterate planet Earth.
  • String theorists squeeze nine dimensions into three

    07/25/2012 3:36:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Science News ^ | Friday, January 13th, 2012 | Devin Powell
    A simulation of the early universe using string theory may explain why space has three observable spatial dimensions instead of nine. The leading mathematical explanation of physics goes beyond modern particle theory by positing tiny bits of vibrating string as the fundamental basis of matter and forces. String theory also requires that the universe have six or more spatial dimensions in addition to the ones observed in everyday life. Explaining how those extra dimensions are hidden is a central challenge for string theorists... In the simulation, the universe starts off as a tiny blob of strings that is symmetric in...
  • How Big is the Entire Universe?

    07/21/2012 12:57:15 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 61 replies
    Starts with a Bang ^ | 7/18/12 | Ethan Siegel
    (25) Millenium simulation from Volker Springel et al., from the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. “The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.” -Stephen Hawking The Universe is a vast, seemingly unending marvel of existence. Over the past century, we’ve learned that the Universe stretches out beyond the billions of stars in our Milky Way, out across billions of light years, containing close to a trillion galaxies all told.Image credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI) and the HUDF Team. And yet, that’s just the observable Universe! There are good reasons to believe that the...
  • Hubble spots spiral galaxy that shouldn't exist

    07/18/2012 5:08:07 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 59 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 18, 2012, 1:05 p.m. | Thomas H. Maugh II
    Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have discovered the oldest known spiral galaxy, a 10.7-billion-year-old anomaly that by all rights shouldn't exist. The galaxy was present in the early universe, about 3 billion years after the Big Bang, at a time when galaxies were still forming and normally looked clumpy and irregular. … In fact, it is a so-called grand design spiral galaxy, which has prominent, well-formed spiral arms. "The fact that this galaxy exists is astounding," Law said. "Current wisdom holds that such grand design spiral galaxies didn't exist at such an early time in the history of the...
  • A Stroll Through the Lyman-Alpha Forest!

    02/19/2004 1:54:19 PM PST · by vannrox · 19 replies · 5,272+ views
    Alternate View Column AV-116 ^ | 08/06/2002 | by John G. Cramer
     As the author of these columns describing cutting edge physics and astronomy, I get quite a few letters and E-mail from readers who are more interested in ?over-the-edge physics and astronomy?.  One recurring theme is various alternatives to the standard model of Big Bang cosmology.  Perhaps the universe is not expanding; it?s just that light ?gets tired? on its path from far away and loses some of its energy.  Perhaps quasars are closer than we think, particularly since some of them appear to be linked to closer galaxies.  Perhaps relativity is wrong, and it?s the speed of light that is...
  • Chandra Discovers "Rivers Of Gravity" That Define Cosmic Landscape

    08/02/2002 4:41:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 60 replies · 970+ views
    ScienceDaily Magazine ^ | Thursday, August 01, 2002 | Editorial Staff
    Reprinted from ScienceDaily Magazine ...Source:             NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center Date Posted:    Thursday, August 01, 2002Web Address:   http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/08/020801080835.htm Chandra Discovers "Rivers Of Gravity" That Define Cosmic Landscape NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered part of an intergalactic web of hot gas and dark matter that contains most of the material in the universe. The hot gas, which appears to lie like a fog in channels carved by rivers of gravity, has been hidden from view since the time galaxies formed. "The Chandra observations, together with ultraviolet observations, are a major advance in our understanding of how the universe evolved over the last 10 billion...
  • Evidence found for existence of intermediate size black hole

    07/08/2012 10:58:16 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 6, 2012 | Bob Yirka report
    EnlargeGalaxy ESO 243-49, about 300 million light-years away, is home to the newly found black hole. Credit: NASA, ESA and S. Farrell (U. Sydney) (Phys.org) -- Over the years, cosmologists have found ample evidence of just two kinds of black holes: stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes. The former are considered small by most standards, just several times the weight of our sun; the latter, as their name implies, huge and as heavy as millions of our sun combined. Not so easy to find have been those that lie somewhere in-between, and because of that, their existence...
  • Revealed at last: Universe's intergalactic dark matter skeleton

    07/07/2012 2:37:39 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 16 replies
    The Register ^ | 6th July 2012 22:55 GMT | Rik Myslewski in San Francisco
    Boffins' first glimpse of the structural framework of our universe Higgs, Schmiggs... When that infinitesimal speck was sucking up all the journalistic oxygen on Independence Day, another momentous scientific discovery was also being announced: the first observation of filaments of dark matter, the stuff that forms the "skeleton" of our universe. Invisible, inexplicable dark matter makes up the vast majority of the mass of our universe. All the matter that we can see – stars, galaxies, planets, haggis, Michele Bachman – total only between 4 and 5 per cent of our universe's mass. The rest? There's dark matter and dark...
  • Serious blow to dark matter theories? New study finds mysterious lack of dark matter...

    04/18/2012 12:11:06 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 58 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | 04-18-2012 | Provided by ESO
    Full title: Serious blow to dark matter theories? New study finds mysterious lack of dark matter in Sun's neighborhood The most accurate study so far of the motions of stars in the Milky Way has found no evidence for dark matter in a large volume around the Sun. According to widely accepted theories, the solar neighbourhood was expected to be filled with dark matter, a mysterious invisible substance that can only be detected indirectly by the gravitational force it exerts. But a new study by a team of astronomers in Chile has found that these theories just do not fit...
  • American Accelerator's Last Hurrah: 99.8% Certainty God Particle is Found

    07/05/2012 8:30:21 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 42 replies
    Daily Tech ^ | July 3, 2012 7:58 PM | Jason Mick (Blog)
    Tevatron presents strong evidence Higgs boson was observed, but LHC needed to provide final verificationTomorrow, while America celebrates July 4, mankind worldwide may celebrate a separate momentous event -- the discovery of the legendary Higgs boson. I. Riding Into the Sunset -- Tevatron Goes Out With a Bang The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will tomorrow hold a special press conference at 9 a.m.  The event will provide an update to the world on the progress in the search for the critical particle using the Large Hadron Collider, the largest and most expensive laboratory apparatus in history.  Many physicists...
  • "It's a boson:" Higgs quest bears new particle

    07/04/2012 7:20:50 AM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 46 replies
    Reuters ^ | July 4, 2012 | Reuters
    GENEVA: Scientists at Europe's CERN research center have found a new subatomic particle, a basic building block of the universe, which appears to be the boson imagined and named half a century ago by theoretical physicist Peter Higgs. "We have reached a milestone in our understanding of nature," CERN director general Rolf Heuer told a gathering of scientists and the world's media near Geneva on Wednesday. "The discovery of a particle consistent with the Higgs boson opens the way to more detailed studies, requiring larger statistics, which will pin down the new particle's properties, and is likely to shed light...
  • Scientists find evidence of 'God particle'

    07/03/2012 4:08:54 AM PDT · by John W · 15 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | July 3, 2012 | AP via Chicago Tribune
    Physicists say they have all but proven that the "God particle" exists. They have a footprint and a shadow, and the only thing left is to see for themselves the elusive subatomic particle believed to give all matter in the universe size and shape. Scientists at the world's biggest atom smasher plan to announce Wednesday that they have nearly confirmed the primary plank of a theory that could restructure the understanding of why matter has mass, which combines with gravity to give an object weight. The focus of the excitement is the Higgs boson, a subatomic particle long sought by...
  • Puny US particle punisher finds strong evidence for God particle

    07/03/2012 3:00:11 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 4 replies
    The Register ^ | 3rd July 2012 09:30 GMT | Bríd-Áine Parnell
    The US particle collider Tevatron has jumped in just ahead of the Large Hadron Collider's results announcement this week to say that their machine has found the "strongest indication to date" of the God particle. The LHC's baby American cousin stopped bashing particles off each other back in March 2001 but the scientists have kept crunching the numbers from the 500 trillion collisions produced to wring the last drops of data out. Today, the boffins said their data "strongly point toward the existence of the Higgs boson" but we're still not there yet. “It is a real cliffhanger," the DZero...
  • APNewsBreak: Proof of 'God particle' found

    07/02/2012 6:57:03 AM PDT · by EBH · 17 replies
    AP ^ | 7/2/12 | JOHN HEILPRIN
    GENEVA (AP) — Scientists working at the world's biggest atom smasher plan to announce Wednesday that they have gathered enough evidence to show that the long-sought "God particle" answering fundamental questions about the universe almost certainly does exist. But after decades of work and billions of dollars spent, researchers at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, say they aren't quite ready to say they've "discovered" the particle. Instead, experts familiar with the research at CERN's vast complex on the Swiss-French border say that the massive data they have obtained will essentially show the footprint of the key particle...
  • God particle is 'found': Scientists at Cern expected to announce on Wednesday Higgs boson..

    07/02/2012 6:02:33 AM PDT · by C19fan · 31 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 2, 2012 | Rob Cooper
    Scientists at Cern will announce that the elusive Higgs boson 'God Particle' has been found at a press conference next week, it is believed. Five leading theoretical physicists have been invited to the event on Wednesday - sparking speculation that the particle has been discovered. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider are expected to say they are 99.99 per cent certain it has been found - which is known as 'four sigma' level.
  • Evidence of 'God particle' found

    07/02/2012 11:40:52 AM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 19 replies
    Associated Press ^ | July 2, 2012
    GENEVA (AP) -- Scientists working at the world's biggest atom smasher plan to announce Wednesday that they have gathered enough evidence to show that the long-sought "God particle" answering fundamental questions about the universe almost certainly does exist. But after decades of work and billions of dollars spent, researchers at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, aren't quite ready to say they've "discovered" the particle.