Keyword: sunspots

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  • Doomsday looming as Sun goes blank sparking ice age fears

    06/28/2016 6:43:48 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 72 replies
    Daily Star ^ | 28th June 2016 | Joshua Nevett
    Astonishing images from NASA reveal no visible sunspots are currently visible on its surface. This has caused the star to go into "cue call" mode having entered its quietest period for more than a century, Vencore Weather claims. Decreased activity is not unusual as solar activity changes the volatile star's surface in 11-year cycles, astronomers say. But researchers are warning this current cycle could have a devastating impact on Earth's atmosphere, possibly ushering in a second ice age, similar to the one which began in 1645. Paul Dorian of Vencore Weather says the blank Sun is a sign that the...
  • Meet Lyuba

    06/27/2016 6:27:06 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 2 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 06/27/16 | Dr. Klaus Kaiser
    Just hope that the current interglacial period will last for a few more decades to come. Anything else would spell disaster for much of mankind! Lyuba, of course, is the name bestowed upon the baby mammoth that was found a few years ago in the western Siberian tundra. The baby woolly mammoth is thought to be around 40,000 years old (by now) and is thought to have died by drowning at the age of two months. What’s so remarkable is Lyuba’s state of preservation, almost life-like, with skin and (sparse) hair fully intact. That kind of find is most uncommon.
  • Is the Sun DISINTEGRATING? NASA spots monster hole open up on our star

    05/26/2016 5:48:32 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 84 replies
    Express UK ^ | 5/26/16 | Jon Austin
    NASA has revealed that a massive hole, measuring more than ten per cent of the Sun's surface area, has opened up on our star. ... NASA says the huge hole is actually not of great concern, but it remains unclear why the coronal holes actually form. ..
  • The number of blizzards has DOUBLED in the past 20 years: Scientists blame global warming

    01/25/2016 5:18:06 PM PST · by MinorityRepublican · 48 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | January 25, 2016 | ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD
    Blizzards, like the one that battered the East Coast this weekend, have doubled in number over the past 20 years. From 1960-94, the US had an average of nine blizzards per year. Since 1995, that annual average has risen to 19. And it's not just their frequency that's increasing. More blizzards are forming outside the normal storm season of October to March, scientists have found.
  • Cosmic Cycles, not Carbon Dioxide, Control Climate

    01/24/2016 8:32:58 AM PST · by Beave Meister · 25 replies
    The Heartland Institute ^ | 1/21/2016 | Viv Forbes
    Those who think the political war on carbon will cool the globe or keep climate stable need to study climate history. Temperatures on Earth dance to a cyclic rhythm every hour, every day, every month, every season, every year, and to every beat of the sun-spot and glacial cycles. The daily solar cycle causes continual changes in temperature for every spot on Earth. It produces the frosts at dawn, the mid-day heat and the cooling at sunset. It is regulated by rotation of the Earth. Superimposed on the daily solar cycle is the monthly lunar cycle, driven by the orbit...
  • Cold sun rising

    11/11/2015 2:17:45 PM PST · by CedarDave · 28 replies
    The Nation ^ | November 11, 2015 | Sam Khoury
    New studies flip climate-change notions upside down The sun will go into "hibernation" mode around 2030, and it has already started to get sleepy. At the Royal Astronomical Society's annual meeting in July, Professor Valentina Zharkova of Northumbria University in the UK confirmed it - the sun will begin its Maunder Minimum (Grand Solar Minimum) in 15 years. Other scientists had suggested years ago that this change was imminent, but Zharkova's model is said to have near-perfect accuracy. So what is a "solar minimum"? Our sun doesn't maintain a constant intensity. Instead, it cycles in spans of approximately 11 years....
  • Increased likelihood of below-normal Atlantic hurricane season

    08/11/2015 8:21:38 AM PDT · by NY.SS-Bar9 · 42 replies
    NOAA ^ | August 6, 2015 | NOAA
    The NOAA Climate Prediction Center’s updated 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook calls for a 90 percent chance of a below-normal hurricane season. A below-normal season is now even more likely than predicted in May, when the likelihood of a below-normal season was 70 percent. “Tropical storms and hurricanes can and do strike the United States, even in below-normal seasons and during El Niño events,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “Regardless of our call for below-normal storm activity, people along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts should remain prepared and vigilant, especially now that...
  • GloBull Warming: The Dog Days of August Are Upon Us

    08/01/2015 8:19:34 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 9 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 8-1-2015 | MOTUS
    So…the science isn’t settled after all? Patrick Moore, co-founder of Greenpeace, explains why “climate change,” far from being a recent human-caused disaster, is, for a myriad of complex reasons, a fact of life on Planet Earth. Of course religion is based on faith, not fact. And since Climate Change is the only religion many Warmers have you can expect them to stick to their guns and cling to their religion.Which is odd, since Marxists are generally opposed to religion. Butt when religion becomes this useful, they simply can’t help themselves. It’s like manna from heaven.So let me be perfectly clear:...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunspot Group AR 2339 Crosses the Sun

    06/29/2015 7:18:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | June 29, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How do sunspots evolve? Large dark sunspots -- and the active regions that contain them -- may last for weeks, but all during that time they are constantly changing. Such variations were particularly apparent a few weeks ago as the active region AR 2339 came around the limb of the Sun and was tracked for the next 12 days by NASA's Solar Dynamic Observatory. In the featured time lapse video, some sunspots drift apart, while others merge. All the while, the dark central umbral regions shift internally and their surrounding lighter penumbras shimmer and wave. The surrounding Sun appears...
  • Strike 3! A third CME raises Watch to G3 level for 22 June

    06/21/2015 7:26:01 PM PDT · by Mad Dawgg · 123 replies
    NOAA.gov ^ | June 21st 2015 | NOAA
    A third, much faster coronal mass ejection (CME) is expected to catch up with the two observed on 18 and 19 June bringing them all to Earth in close succession by the UTC day of 22 June 2015. The CME was associated with an R1-Minor flare event observed at 0142 UTC (9:21 pm ET) from Sunspot Region 12371 located near center disk. A G3-Strong Geomagnetic Storm Watch has been issued for 22 June as well as a G2-Moderate Watch for 23 June as the CMEs make their way past Earth. These Watches supersede all prior forecasts. Stay tuned to...
  • The sun is now virtually blank during the weakest solar cycle in more than a century

    05/05/2015 7:54:35 AM PDT · by rktman · 81 replies
    vencoreweather.com ^ | 4/30/2015 | unknown
    The sun is almost completely blank. The main driver of all weather and climate, the entity which occupies 99.86% of all of the mass in our solar system, the great ball of fire in the sky has gone quiet again during what is likely to be the weakest sunspot cycle in more than a century. The sun's X-ray output has flatlined in recent days and NOAA forecasters estimate a scant 1% chance of strong flares in the next 24 hours. Not since cycle 14 peaked in February 1906 has there been a solar cycle with fewer sunspots. We are currently...
  • NASA Admits That Winters are Going to Get Colder…Much Colder

    03/03/2015 9:48:29 AM PST · by Perseverando · 67 replies
    D.C. Clothesline ^ | November 18, 2014 | Chris Carrington
    The Maunder Minimum (also known as the prolonged sunspot minimum) is the name used for the period roughly spanning 1645 to 1715 when sunspots became exceedingly rare, as noted by solar observers of the time. Like the Dalton Minimum and Spörer Minimum, the Maunder Minimum coincided with a period of lower-than-average global temperatures. During one 30-year period within the Maunder Minimum, astronomers observed only about 50 sunspots, as opposed to a more typical 40,000-50,000 spots. (Source) Climatologist John Casey, a former space shuttle engineer and NASA consultant, thinks that last year’s winter, described by USA Today as “one of...
  • NASA’s MMS Spacecraft Set for March Blastoff to study Earth’s Magnetic Reconnection Events

    03/01/2015 5:13:53 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 7 replies
    Universe Today ^ | FEBRUARY 28, 2015 | by KEN KREMER
    Technicians work on NASA’s 20-foot-tall Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mated quartet of stacked observatories in the cleanroom at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., on May 12, 2014. Credit: Ken Kremer- kenkremer.com NASA’s first mission dedicated to study the process in nature known as magnetic reconnection undergoing final preparation for launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida in just under two weeks time. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is comprised of a quartet of identically instrumented observatories aimed at providing the first three-dimensional views of a fundamental process in nature known as magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection is the process whereby...
  • Bad news for warmists: Sun has entered 'weakest solar cycle in a century'

    02/18/2015 10:02:44 AM PST · by Las Vegas Dave · 23 replies
    americanthinker.com ^ | February 18, 2015 | Thomas Lifson
    The conceit that human production of carbon dioxide is capable of driving the earth’s climate is running smack into the sun. CO2 accounts for a mere 0.039% of the atmosphere, while the sun accounts for 99.86% of all of the mass in our entire solar system. And Ol’ Sol is not taking the insult lightly. Vencore Weather reports: For the past 5 days, solar activity has been very low and one measure of solar activity – its X-ray output – has basically flatlined in recent days (plot below courtesy NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center). Not since cycle 14 peaked in February...
  • Early Sunspots and Volcanoes ( connections? )

    02/11/2015 11:55:50 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 10 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | February 10, 2015 | Willis Eschenbach
    Guest Post by Willis EschenbachWell, as often happens I started out in one direction and then I got sidetractored … I wanted to respond to Michele Casati’s claim in the comments of my last post. His claim was that if we include the Maunder Minimum in the 1600’s, it’s clear that volcanoes with a VEI greater or equal to 5 are affected by sunspots. Based on my previous analysis I figured “No way!”, but I thought I should take a look … and as is often the case, I ended up studying something entirely different.Now, the SIDC monthly sunspot record...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Sun in X-rays from NuSTAR

    12/29/2014 4:04:56 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | December 29, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why are the regions above sunspots so hot? Sunspots themselves are a bit cooler than the surrounding solar surface because the magnetic fields that create them reduce convective heating. It is therefore unusual that regions overhead -- even much higher up in the Sun's corona -- can be hundreds of times hotter. To help find the cause, NASA directed the Earth-orbiting Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite to point its very sensitive X-ray telescope at the Sun. Featured above is the Sun in ultraviolet light, shown in a red hue as taken by the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)....
  • How To Predict Dangerous Solar Flares

    12/16/2014 10:38:01 AM PST · by blam · 15 replies
    BI - Scientific American ^ | 12-16-2014 | Monica Bobra
    Monica Bobra, Scientific American December 16, 2014A couple of months ago, the sun sported the largest sunspot we've seen in the last 24 years. This monstrous spot, visible to the naked eye (that is, without magnification, but with protective eyewear of course), launched more than 100 flares. The number of the spots on the sun ebbs and flows cyclically, every 11 years. Right now, the sun is in the most active part of this cycle: we're expecting lots of spots and lots of flares in the coming months. Usually, the media focuses on the destructive power of solar flares —...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunspots and Solar Eclipse

    10/26/2014 7:25:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | October 25, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A New Moon joined giant sunspot group AR 2192 to dim the bright solar disk during Thursday's much anticipated partial solar eclipse. Visible from much of North America, the Moon's broad silhouette is captured in this extreme telephoto snapshot near eclipse maximum from Santa Cruz, California. About the size of Jupiter, the remarkable AR 2192 itself darkens a noticeable fraction of the Sun, near center and below the curved lunar limb. As the sunspot group slowly rotates across the Sun and out of view in the coming days its activity is difficult to forecast. But the timing of solar...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- AR 2192: Giant on the Sun

    10/26/2014 7:22:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | October 24, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: As you (safely!) watched the progress of yesterday's partial solar eclipse, you probably also spotted a giant sunspot group. Captured in this sharp telescopic image from October 22nd the complex AR 2192 is beautiful to see, a sprawling solar active region comparable in size to the diameter of Jupiter. Like other smaller sunspot groups, AR 2192 is now crossing the Earth-facing side of the Sun and appears dark in visible light because it is cooler than the surrounding surface. Still, the energy stored in the region's twisted magnetic fields is enormous and has already generated powerful explosions, including two...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunspot Group AR 2192 Crackles

    10/26/2014 7:15:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | October 22, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One of the largest sunspot groups in recent years is now crossing the Sun. Labelled Active Region 2192, it has already thrown a powerful solar flare and has the potential to produce more. The featured video shows a time lapse sequence of the Sun in visible and ultraviolet light taken yesterday and incorporating the previous 48 hours. AR 2192, rotating in from the left, rivals Jupiter in size and is literally crackling with magnetic energy. The active Sun has caused some spectacular auroras in recent days, and energetic particles originating from AR 2192 may help continue them over the...
  • Beastly Sunspot Amazes, Heightens Eclipse Excitement

    10/22/2014 1:31:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on October 22, 2014 | Bob King
    Properly shielded, it was very easy to see with the naked eye. Unlike some other naked eye sunspots, this one showed structure. The eastern end was darker, the western half grayer and more extended. Through a small telescope, the mix of dark umbras scattered amid weirdly sculpted penumbral “islands” was incredible to see. Photographs like the one above are wonderful documents, but witnessing this beautiful complex magnetic mess with your own eyes is another experience altogether. Region 2192 continues to grow and size and complexity and is now the largest sunspot group of solar cycle 24 which began in 2009...
  • LOTS OF SOLAR FLARES (Today)

    10/22/2014 7:23:25 AM PDT · by tired&retired · 11 replies
    Spaceweather.com ^ | 10/22/2014 | Spaceweather
    During the past 48 hours, monster sunspot AR2192 has unleashed seven M-class solar flares. The most powerful of the bunch (Oct 22nd at 0159 UT) was an M9-class eruption that almost crossed the threshold into X-territory. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded the extreme ultraviolet flash. UV radiation from the flare ionized Earth's upper atmosphere, causing a brief blackout of HF radio communications on the dayside of Earth (e.g., parts of Asia and Australia). In addition, the explosion might have hurled a CME into space. Confirmation awaits the arrival of coronagraph data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Stay tuned...
  • Awesome Photo Shows Monster Sunspot Aiming Our Way

    10/20/2014 1:23:32 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | October 20, 2014 | Jason Major off
    According to Spaceweather.com AR2192 has grown considerably over the past few days and has the potential to unleash M- and X-class flares in our direction now that it’s moving into Earth-facing position. It’s currently many times larger than Earth and will likely get even bigger… in fact, during this week’s partial solar eclipse AR2192 should be visible with the naked (but not unprotected!) eye for viewers across much of North America.
  • NASA Solar Forecasting Takes A Hit As Sun-Gazing Spacecraft Stops Phoning Home

    10/14/2014 7:17:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 2 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | October 14, 2014 | Elizabeth Howell (not on)
    One of the STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) spacecraft stopped phoning home to Earth on Oct. 1 “immediately after a planned reset of the spacecraft”, NASA said in an update last week. .... NASA didn’t say how badly solar weather forecasts are affected, but in other materials they have said both STEREO spacecraft are a crucial part of this work. STEREO’s pair of satellites ... aim to better map Sun eruptions ( “coronal mass ejections”) whose charged particles can disrupt satellite communications during solar storms. The mission has been ongoing since 2006 and they’ve viewed the far side of the...
  • Sunspots 2014: March is another record-breaking month

    04/26/2014 5:29:46 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 12 replies
    Communities Digital News ^ | April 3, 2014 | Steve Davidson
    SALEM, Ore., April 3, 2014 – Another new solar sunspot record peak of 73.2 was set for Cycle 24 last month. It smashed the old 68.9 record peak set the previous month. In a big surprise, the number is now over six spots higher than the first sunspot peak set in early 2012 and will probably go higher. A secondary peak above the first this much is almost unheard of. The new sunspot peak is unusual for two conflicting reasons: The secondary peak is higher than the first Current physics suggests the solar cycle should be weakening Conflicting signals coming...
  • X-FLARE! AR1967 returned to the Earthside of the sun on Feb. 25th and promptly erupted

    02/26/2014 12:34:51 AM PST · by tired&retired · 8 replies
    SpaceWeather.Com ^ | 2/25/2014 | Space Weather
    X-FLARE! Long-lived sunspot AR1967 returned to the Earthside of the sun on Feb. 25th and promptly erupted, producing an X4.9-class solar flare. This is the strongest flare of the year so far and one of the strongest of the current solar cycle. A movie from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory shows the explosion hurling a loop of hot plasma away from the blast site: http://spaceweather.com/images2014/25feb14/redflare3_strip4.gif The source of the eruption is long-lived sunspot AR1967, now beginning its third trip across the Earthside of the sun. This region was an active producer of flares during its previous transits, and it looks like...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sun and Prominence

    03/04/2014 3:23:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | March 04, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Dramatic prominences can sometimes be seen looming just beyond the edge of the sun. Such was the case last week as a large prominence, visible above, highlighted a highly active recent Sun. A waving sea of hot gas is visible in the foreground chromosphere in great detail as it was imaged in one specific color of light emitted by hydrogen. A solar prominence is a cloud of solar gas held just above the surface by the Sun's magnetic field. The Earth, illustrated in the inset, is smaller than the prominence. Although very hot, prominences typically appear dark when viewed...
  • Yesterday’s Mammoth Solar Flare Is The Biggest Of 2014 So Far

    02/25/2014 1:48:46 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 25, 2014 | Elizabeth Howell on
    The so-called X-class flare erupted a few hours ago (at 7:25 p.m. EST Feb. 24, or 12:25 a.m. UTC Feb. 25) and was captured by several spacecraft. If you have a pictures of the sun yourself to share, feel free to post them in the Universe Today Flickr pool. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory saw the flare growing in at least six different wavelengths of light, which are visible in the image above. This is classified this as an X4.9-class flare, which shows that it is pretty strong. X-flares are the most powerful kind that the sun emits, and each X...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunspot Loops in Ultraviolet

    01/26/2014 9:00:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | January 26, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It was a quiet day on the Sun. The above image shows, however, that even during off days the Sun's surface is a busy place. Shown in ultraviolet light, the relatively cool dark regions have temperatures of thousands of degrees Celsius. Large sunspot group AR 9169 from the last solar cycle is visible as the bright area near the horizon. The bright glowing gas flowing around the sunspots has a temperature of over one million degrees Celsius. The reason for the high temperatures is unknown but thought to be related to the rapidly changing magnetic field loops that channel...
  • STORM WARNING: NOAA forecasters estimate a 90% chance of geomagnetic storms on Jan. 9th

    01/09/2014 7:45:34 AM PST · by tired&retired · 87 replies
    spaceweather.com/ ^ | January 9, 2014 | Spaceweather.com
    STORM WARNING: NOAA forecasters estimate a 90% chance of geomagnetic storms on Jan. 9th when a CME is expected to hit Earth's magnetic field. The speed of the solar wind around Earth could spike to 700 km/s (1.6 million mph) shortly after the impact, sharply compressing Earth's magnetosphere. High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras. http://spaceweather.com/ HUGE SUNSPOT, CHANCE OF FLARES: The source of the incoming CME is AR1944, one of the largest sunspots of the current solar cycle. The active region sprawls across more than 200,000 km of solar terrain and contains dozens of dark cores. The largest...
  • Solar activity causes particle storm, delays rocket launch

    01/08/2014 7:38:45 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    latimes.com ^ | January 8, 2014, 6:54 p.m. | Deborah Netburn
    Massive sunspot AR 1944 is getting feisty, and doing some damage. Several Earth-lengths across, it is one of the largest sunspots seen in a decade. It is also complex, with dozens of dark cores. "Sometimes you see a nice, big simple brown sunspot, and even though it's big, it's boring," said Alex Young of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "But as soon as they start getting twisted and breaking apart and merging with each other, you know something exciting is going to happen." And something exciting has happened. Tuesday afternoon, AR 1944 was the source of a powerful X-class solar...
  • The sun's magnetic field is about to flip

    12/30/2013 9:48:19 AM PST · by Farnsworth · 44 replies
    Sun Herald ^ | December 30 2013 | NASA
    The sun is flipping its poles! Actually, NASA reports that this phenomenon happens about 11 years, when the sun's vast magnetic field flips. "It looks like we're no more than three to four months away from a complete field reversal," said solar physicist Todd Hoeksema of Stanford University. "This change will have ripple effects throughout the solar system." A video shows how the sun will complete the reversal, which appens at the peak of each solar cycle as the sun's inner magnetic dynamo re-organizes. The current "flip" is the midway point of Solar Cycle 24, NASA said. Hoeksema is the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- SDO's Multiwavelength Sun

    12/21/2013 6:55:56 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | December 21, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Today, the solstice is at 17:11 Universal Time, the Sun reaching the southernmost declination in its yearly journey through planet Earth's sky. The December solstice marks the astronomical beginning of winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the south. To celebrate, explore this creative visualization of the Sun from visible to extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, using image data from the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Against a base image made at a visible wavelengths, the wedge-shaped segments show the solar disk at increasingly shorter ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. Shown in false-color and rotating in a clockwise direction, the...
  • Calm solar cycle prompts questions about impact on Earth

    11/25/2013 7:27:34 AM PST · by Star Traveler · 20 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | November 24, 2013 | Jean-Louis Santini
    Washington (AFP) - The surface of the sun has been surprisingly calm of late -- with fewer sunspots than anytime in in the last century -- prompting curious scientists to wonder just what it might mean here on Earth. Sunspots have been observed for millennia -- first by Chinese astronomers and then, for the first time with a telescope, by Galileo in 1610. The sunspots appear in roughly 11-year cycles -- increasing to a daily flurry and then subsiding drastically, before amping up again. But this cycle -- dubbed cycle 24 -- has surprised scientists with its sluggishness. The number...
  • Strange Doings on the Sun

    11/11/2013 7:10:30 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 100 replies
    WSJ ^ | Nov. 10, 2013 7:25 p.m. ET | Robert Lee Hotz
    To complicate the riddle, the sun also is undergoing one of its oddest magnetic reversals on record. Normally, the sun's magnetic north and south poles change polarity every 11 years or so. During a magnetic-field reversal, the sun's polar magnetic fields weaken, drop to zero, and then emerge again with the opposite polarity. As far as scientists know, the magnetic shift is notable only because it signals the peak of the solar maximum, said Douglas Biesecker at NASA's Space Environment Center. But in this cycle, the sun's magnetic poles are out of sync, solar scientists said. The sun's north magnetic...
  • Solar Activity Ramps Up as Giant Sunspot Group Turns to Face Earth

    11/08/2013 6:06:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | November 8, 2013 | Nancy Atkinson on
    While old Sol had been fairly quiet for the time where it was supposed to be active in its normal 11-year cycle, only recently has activity ramped up with increased flares and sunspots. During 2013, there has been intermittent strong activity (like this and this in May), but the activity since mid-October is really the first extended period of activity. Speaking of sunspots, a huge group called designated as AR 1890 has turned to face Earth. Thanks to astrophotographer Ron Cottrell for capturing the group today, above. Spaceweather.com reports that this sunspot has a trend of producing very brief flares....
  • Sun set for 11-year magnetic pole flip

    10/07/2013 9:31:58 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 36 replies
    Times of India ^ | Oct 7, 2013, 05.18 AM IST | Amit Bhattacharya, TNN
    NEW DELHI: A special event is about to occur in our sun, and it could impact our lives. The magnetic poles of the sun — which are like the ends of a giant bar magnet — are about to flip, that is, the polar north will become the polar south and vice versa. According to scientists at the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University , the sun could be barely two to three months away from this magnetic field reversal. The change is periodic, taking place once every 11 years or so. The flip also corresponds with peak activity during...
  • Newsbytes: Sunspot Enigma – Will Inactive Sun Cause Global Cooling?

    07/25/2013 5:24:36 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    Watts Up With That? ^ | July 24, 2013 | by Anthony Watts
     From Dr. Benny Peiser and the GWPFWe Really Don’t Understand Our Climate Something is happening to our sun. If history is anything to go by, the sun’s change of mood could affect us all by cooling the earth and throwing our climate change calculations into disarray. It might even be the case that the earth’s response to low solar activity will overturn many of our assumptions about man’s influence on climate change. Cold not warmth might be our future. We do not know. We must keep watching the sun. –David Whitehouse, Public Service Europe, 24 July 2013Global warming has been...
  • Sunspots and the Great Cooling Ahead

    07/23/2013 8:15:44 PM PDT · by neverdem · 61 replies
    American Thinker ^ | July 18, 2013 | Jeffrey Folks
    Presumably, even among the ill-informed ideologues at the White House, there are a few who have heard of sunspots. There may even be one who knows, as most informed persons do, of the correlation between sunspot activity and the earth's climate. But apparently no one has bothered to inform the president. When sunspot activity is high, as it was during the 1990s and early 2000s, temperatures tend to be high as well. When it is low, as it is now, temperatures fall. And because sunspot activity occurs in decades-long cycles, the unusually cold winter and spring of 2012 may be...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Large Sunspots Now Crossing the Sun

    07/10/2013 3:18:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | July 10, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One of the largest sunspot regions in recent years is now crossing the Sun. This region of convoluted magnetic fields may well produce a solar flare that releases a cloud of energetic particles into the Solar System. Were a very powerful cloud to impact the Earth's magnetosphere, it could be dangerous to Earth-orbiting astronauts and satellites. Conversely, the impact of even a less energetic cloud might create picturesque aurora. Pictured above is the sunspot region as it appeared two days ago. The rightmost part of this region has been cataloged as AR 11785, while the left part as AR...
  • Solar Cycle Warnings

    04/01/2013 2:37:45 PM PDT · by blam · 44 replies
    TMO ^ | 4-1-2013 | Andrew McKillop
    Solar Cycle Warnings Politics / Environmental IssuesApril 01, 2013 - 01:31 PM GMT By: Andrew McKillop RECORD LOW SUNSPOT NUMBERS For reasons including "pure politically correct", NASA has fought a losing battle - against reality - on the subject of Global Warming, which it feels obliged to believe in as a "scientifically correct" theory. Linked to this, quite directly, NASA has also battled against reality on the subject of sunspot frequency, size, location on the Sun's surface and other variables linked to sunspot cycles in this present Cycle 24 of approximately 11-year-long cycles. These have been accurately recorded since Cycle...
  • The calm before the solar storm? NASA warns ‘something unexpected is happening to the Sun’

    03/08/2013 10:13:37 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 12:34 EST, 8 March 2013 | Mark Prigg
    “Something unexpected” is happening on the Sun, NASA has warned. This year was supposed to be the year of “solar maximum,” the peak of the 11-year sunspot cycle. But … solar activity is relatively low. “Sunspot numbers are well below their values from 2011, and strong solar flares have been infrequent,” the space agency says. … Experts have been baffled by the apparent lack of activity—with many wondering if NASA simply got it wrong. However, Solar physicist Dean Pesnell of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center believes he has a different explanation. “This is solar maximum,” he says. “But it looks...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Coronal Rain on the Sun

    02/26/2013 4:02:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | February 26, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Does it rain on the Sun? Yes, although what falls is not water but extremely hot plasma. An example occurred in mid-July 2012 after an eruption on the Sun that produced both a Coronal Mass Ejection and a moderate solar flare. What was more unusual, however, was what happened next. Plasma in the nearby solar corona was imaged cooling and falling back, a phenomenon known as coronal rain. Because they are electrically charged, electrons, protons, and ions in the rain were gracefully channeled along existing magnetic loops near the Sun's surface, making the scene appear as a surreal three-dimensional...
  • Climate Change

    01/23/2013 8:31:41 PM PST · by Paul Pierett · 21 replies
    http://sunspotshurricanesandglaciers.com/ ^ | January 2013 | Paul Pierett
    Having tired of writing in blogs and having lost the support of a blog that carried my work, I now have my own web page. I opened my own web site on climate change. I wrote it for the average person. sunspotshurricanesandglaciers.com It is not a blog. It is information in nature. If you wish to comment, my email is on my work or you can use the message traffic here. I open my free republic about once a week to see what is happening. I open my web site about the same to proof-read each page. I always find...
  • Signal, Interrupted: Sun Spots Interfere with Satellites this Week

    10/04/2012 6:19:03 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 5 replies
    www.counselheal.com ^ | Oct 04, 2012 09:54 AM EDT | S.C. Stringfellow
    Is your cable television signal fuzzy, internet reception spotty or cell phone service dropping in and out? Don't blame your service provider over the next few days, blame the sun. Expected solar flare activity now through next Thursday is expected to interrupt satellite signals to earth and cause signal interference. Sun outages happen during the spring and fall when solar radiation interferes with satellite signals, said Matthew Templeton of the American Association of Variable Star Observers. The sun is currently in a period of maximum activity and solar flares will be at their highest point in years. The last time...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Filament Across the Sun

    08/20/2012 3:56:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | August 20, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Is that a cloud hovering over the Sun? Yes, but it is quite different than a cloud hovering over the Earth. The long light feature on the left of the above color-inverted image is actually a solar filament and is composed of mostly charged hydrogen gas held aloft by the Sun's looping magnetic field. By contrast, clouds over the Earth are usually much cooler, composed mostly of tiny water droplets, and are held aloft by upward air motions because they are weigh so little. The above filament was captured on the Sun about two weeks ago near the active...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Filament Across the Sun

    08/20/2012 3:56:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | August 20, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Is that a cloud hovering over the Sun? Yes, but it is quite different than a cloud hovering over the Earth. The long light feature on the left of the above color-inverted image is actually a solar filament and is composed of mostly charged hydrogen gas held aloft by the Sun's looping magnetic field. By contrast, clouds over the Earth are usually much cooler, composed mostly of tiny water droplets, and are held aloft by upward air motions because they are weigh so little. The above filament was captured on the Sun about two weeks ago near the active...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- AR1520: Islands in the Photosphere

    07/14/2012 6:04:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | July 14, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Awash in a sea of plasma and anchored in magnetic fields, sunspots are planet-sized, dark islands in the solar photosphere, the bright surface of the Sun. Dark because they are slightly cooler than the surrounding surface, this group of sunspots is captured in a close-up telescopic snapshot from July 11. The field of view spans nearly 100,000 miles. They lie in the center of active region AR1520, now crossing the Sun's visible face. In fact, an X-class solar flare and coronal mass ejection erupted from AR1520 on July 12, releasing some of the energy stored in the region's twisted...
  • Sun storms: solar activity at fiery high

    07/09/2012 7:30:40 PM PDT · by markomalley · 31 replies
    CBS News ^ | 7/9/2012
    This has already been a summer of record heat in the continental United States. But our sun is not content with just breaking records in the first week of July. It has also been an intense period of solar flares - massive, violent outbursts from the sun that can wreck havoc here on Earth. And it shows no signs of stopping. Even on the surface of the sun, things are heating up. Last week saw several huge solar flares, the biggest of which occurred on Friday, July 6. Labeled an X1.1 class solar flare - the strongest classification used by...
  • Sunspot AR1476 takes aim on Earth ( Video of the action from the comments)

    05/13/2012 10:28:30 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 19 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | May 11, 2012 | Anthony Watts
    From Spaceweather.com NOAA forecasters estimate a 75% chance of M-class solar flares and a 20% chance of X-flares during the next 24 hours. Any eruptions are likely to be geoeffective because the source, sunspot AR1476, is directly facing our planet.Yesterday, May 10th, amateur astronomer David Maidment of Sohar, Oman caught the active region in mid-flare during a strong M5-class eruption:The blast, which almost crossed the threshold into X-territory, did not produce a significant coronal mass ejection (CME). “There seemed to be no CME due to the fact that the plasma was captured and dragged back down to the sun,” notes...