HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Layoffs  NaturalBornCitizen  FastandFurious  OPSEC  Benghazi  Libya  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice  Donate

Dear FRiends, Your loyal support makes Free Republic possible and your continuing participation makes FR the number one grassroots pro-life conservative forum on the planet! If you have not yet made your donation, please click here and do so now. Thank you very much, Jim Robinson

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $31,442
35%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 35% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Technical (News/Activism)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Hybrid copper-gold nanoparticles convert CO2 (To Hydrocarbons!)

    04/11/2012 8:26:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 59 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | 04-11-12 | Jennifer Chu - Provided by Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Copper -- the stuff of pennies and tea kettles -- is also one of the few metals that can turn carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels with relatively little energy. When fashioned into an electrode and stimulated with voltage, copper acts as a strong catalyst, setting off an electrochemical reaction with carbon dioxide that reduces the greenhouse gas to methane or methanol. Various researchers around the world have studied copper’s potential as an energy-efficient means of recycling carbon dioxide emissions in powerplants: Instead of being released into the atmosphere, carbon dioxide would be circulated through a copper catalyst and turned into...
  • Microfluidic fuel cell powers forward

    04/10/2012 6:21:19 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Chemistry world ^ | 10 April 2012 | Andy Extance
    Researchers at Cornell University in the US have challenged prevailing fuel cell wisdom by throwing out three standard characteristics of today's mainstream systems to drive down their cost. Héctor Abruńa and Abraham Stroock's team changed the fuel and oxidant chemicals used and the cell design that keeps them apart, getting power densities above 0.25 W/cm2. 'What we attain is extraordinary for a device that simple,' Abruńa  tells Chemistry World.  'Fuel cells for automotive applications are typically around 1-2W/cm2. It's not that far off.'   The microfluidic fuel cell doesn't need an expensive Nafion membrane to keep the fuel and oxidant separate © Cornell...
  • Graphene puts wet chemistry under the microscope

    04/08/2012 12:54:35 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 05 April 2012 | Simon Hadlington
    The list of remarkable applications for graphene grows ever longer. This time, scientists in the US and Korea have shown that the single-atom thick carbon membrane can be used as a cover slip for an electron microscope to allow atomic-resolution observations of wet chemistry - something that is notoriously tricky to achieve. The graphene cover slip allows researchers to watch liquid chemistry taking place in much greater detail © Image courtesy of Alivisatos, Lee and Zettl research groups, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and KAIST The researchers wanted to investigate how platinum nanocrystals form from solution. 'Seeing the crystals form at...
  • Brain imaging: fMRI 2.0

    04/08/2012 11:11:33 AM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    Nature News ^ | 04 April 2012 | Kerri Smith
    Functional magnetic resonance imaging is growing from showy adolescence into a workhorse of brain imaging. The blobs appeared 20 years ago. Two teams, one led by Seiji Ogawa at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, the other by Kenneth Kwong at Massachusetts General Hospital in Charlestown, slid a handful of volunteers into giant magnets. With their heads held still, the volunteers watched flashing lights or tensed their hands, while the research teams built the data flowing from the machines into grainy images showing parts of the brain illuminated as multicoloured blobs. The results showed that a technique called functional...
  • Plasma Flashlight Zaps Bacteria

    04/07/2012 11:17:23 PM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 4 April 2012 | Jon Cartwright
    Enlarge Image Light therapy . A portable plasma flashlight can kill bacteria in minutes. (Credit: X. Pei et al., Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics) Credit: X. Pei et al., Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (2012) Killing harmful bacteria in hospitals is difficult; out in the field, it can be an even bigger problem. Now, researchers may have a means for remote disinfection in a portable "flashlight" that shines a ray of cold plasma to kill bacteria in minutes. Medical scientists have high hopes for plasmas. Produced in electrical discharges, these gases of free electrons and ions have...
  • ScienceShot: Water Floats on Oil

    04/07/2012 10:37:07 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 5 April 2012 | Jon Cartwright
    Credit: NASA; (inset) Chi M. Phan Two years ago, the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig covered hundreds of square miles of the Gulf of Mexico with oil (main image). The oil floated because it is less dense, and therefore lighter, than water. But now scientists say that water can sometimes float on oil—and their findings, which were published last month in Langmuir, could help to mop up oil slicks like the one created by the 2010 disaster. Using a theoretical model, the scientists calculated the forces acting on water when it is dripped onto an oil surface....
  • Ultrashort pulse laser surgery of the cornea and the sclera

    04/03/2012 7:49:33 PM PDT · by muawiyah · 9 replies
    Journal of Optics ^ | JULY 2010 | K Plamann
    REVIEW ARTICLE The strongly localized interaction process of ultrashort laser pulses with tissue makes femtosecond lasers a powerful tool for eye surgery. These lasers are now routinely used in refractive surgery and other forms of surgery of the anterior segment of the eye. Several clinical laser systems also offer options for corneal grafting and the potential use of ultrashort pulse lasers in glaucoma surgery has been the object of several recent studies which have shown promising results.While devices aimed for interventions in clear tissue may be based on available solid state or fibre laser technology, the development of tools for...
  • Flying car a 'step closer': Terrafugia (Update)

    04/03/2012 11:29:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 04-03-2012 | by Andrew Beatty
    Drivers hoping to slip the surly -- and traffic congested -- bonds of Earth moved a step closer to realizing their dream, as a US firm said it had successfully tested a street-legal plane. Massachusetts-based firm Terrafugia said their production prototype "Transition" car-plane had completed an eight-minute test flight, clearing the way for it to hit the market within a year. "With this flight, the team demonstrated an ability to accomplish what had been called an impossible dream," said founder Carl Dietrich. The two-seater craft, which has the rounded features of a Fiat 500 and collapsible wings, is on presale...
  • Dutch 'flying car' takes to the skies

    04/03/2012 11:22:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 04-03-2012 | Staff
    Is it a flying car or a driving aircraft? Either way, the Personal Air and Land Vehicle, or PAL-V for short, has just proved it can handle the skies as well as the highway, both at up to 180 kilometres (112 miles) per hour, its Dutch developers said Tuesday. The PAL-V is a gyrocopter that can fly as far as 500 kilometres (315 miles) at an altitude of up to 4,000 feet (1,200 metres). When it lands, it tucks away its rotor-blades and turns into a road-legal three-wheeled vehicle with a range of 1,200 kilometres. "In future, you will be...
  • More combined Arctic and Antarctic sea ice than 30 year average.

    04/02/2012 11:41:37 AM PDT · by Kinsingmonster · 9 replies
    University of Ilinois ^ | April 2, 2012 | Universtity of Ilinois
    http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/global.daily.ice.area.withtrend.jpg
  • Make Technology--and the World--Frictionless

    04/01/2012 12:15:28 PM PDT · by ShadowAce · 19 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 21 March 2012 | David Pogue
    A few months back I was at the main Apple Store in New York City. I wanted to buy a case for my son’s iPod touch—but it was December 23. The crowds were so thick, I envied sardines. Fortunately, I knew something that most of these people didn’t: I could grab an item off the shelf, scan it with my iPhone and walk right out. Thanks to the free Apple Store app, I didn’t have to wait in line or even find an employee. The purchase was instantly billed to my Apple account. I was in and out of there...
  • Warned of an Attack on the Internet, and Getting Ready

    03/31/2012 5:33:43 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 40 replies
    The New York Times ^ | March 30, 2012 | By SOMINI SENGUPTA
    On a quiet Sunday in mid-February, something curious attracted the attention of the behind-the-scenes engineers who scour the Internet for signs of trouble. There, among the ubiquitous boasts posted by the hacking collective Anonymous, was a call to attack some of the network’s most crucial parts. The message called it Operation Global Blackout, and rallied Anonymous supporters worldwide to attack the Domain Name System. It declared when the attack would be carried out: March 31. And it detailed exactly how: by bombarding the Domain Name System with junk traffic in an effort to overwhelm it altogether.
  • Scientists Manipulate Electrons Into Material Never Seen on Earth

    03/29/2012 9:51:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    gizmodo.com ^ | Mar 14, 2012 | Kristen Philipkoski
    Stanford scientists have created designer electrons that behave as if they were exposed to a magnetic field of 60 Tesla—a force 30 percent stronger than anything ever sustained on Earth. The work could lead to a revolution in the materials that make everything from video displays to airplanes to mobile phones. "The behavior of electrons in materials is at the heart of essentially all of today's technologies," said Hari Manoharan, associate professor of physics at Stanford and a member of SLAC's Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, who led the research. "We're now able to tune the fundamental properties...
  • James Cameron Reaches Deepest Spot on Earth

    03/25/2012 6:02:22 PM PDT · by anymouse · 51 replies · 3+ views
    Hollywood icon James Cameron has made it to Earth's deepest point. The director of "Titanic," ''Avatar" and other films used a specially designed submarine to dive nearly seven miles, completing his journey a little before 8 a.m. Monday local time, according to Stephanie Montgomery of the National Geographic Society. He plans to spend about six hours exploring and filming the Mariana Trench, about 200 miles southwest of the Pacific island of Guam. "All systems OK," were Cameron's first words upon reaching the bottom, according to a statement. His arrival at a depth of 35,756 feet came early Sunday evening on...
  • New device invisible to magnetic fields

    03/24/2012 11:19:51 PM PDT · by U-238 · 26 replies · 1+ views
    Defense Talk ^ | 3/24/2012 | Defense Talk
    European researchers said Thursday they have created a device invisible to a static magnetic field that could have practical military and medical applications. Fedor Gomory and colleagues in Slovakia and Spain designed a cloak for a direct current, or dc, magnetic field that is static and produced by a permanent magnet or coil carrying a direct current. DC magnetic fields are used in MRI imaging devices, in hospitals and in security systems, such as those in airports. The researchers' device, described in a study in Friday's edition of the journal Science, features a cylinder with two concentric layers. While the...
  • The Moon’s Long Lost Twin Found

    03/24/2012 12:57:47 AM PDT · by U-238 · 79 replies · 2+ views
    International Business Times ^ | 8/11/2011 | International Business Times
    The moon maybe palely alone in the night sky today but according to scientists it is possible that the there was a second, smaller moon 4.4 billion years ago. A paper published in the journal Nature theorized that there was a smaller moon created in the same impact that created the moon. Astronomers, Martin Jutzi and Erik Asphaug of the University of California at Santa Cruz have long wondered why the moon had two incongruous sides, one smooth with flat plains and another side full of rugged mountains and craters. The astronomers started thinking that the mountainous region had been...
  • Congress seeks more U.S. aid for Iron Dome

    03/23/2012 7:36:46 PM PDT · by U-238 · 5 replies
    UPI ^ | 3/23/2012 | UPI
    Key leaders of the U.S. Congress want U.S. President Barack Obama to provide funds to help Israel, should it request it, to produce more batteries of the Iron Dome counter-rocket system. Israel's air force has three batteries deployed to protect cities in the southern Negev Desert against rockets fired by Palestinian militants in the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip but budget problems mean it can't fund more batteries needed to shield the rest of the country. Iron Dome, which racked up a 90 percent kill rate against Palestinian Qassam and Grad rockets in recent weeks, was developed by Rafael Advanced Defense Systems...
  • USAF fields first upgraded F-22 Raptors

    03/23/2012 7:27:03 PM PDT · by U-238 · 17 replies
    Flight Global ^ | 3/23/2012 | Dave Mujumdar
    The US Air Force has begun to deploy Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptors upgraded with enhanced air-to-ground strike capabilities to the operational fleet, starting with the 3rd Wing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Alaska. "The 525th Fighter Squadron was the first Combat Air Forces squadron to receive an [Increment] 3.1 modified aircraft," says squadron commander Lt Col Paul "Max" Moga. "The capabilities this incremental upgrade brings are a complete game-changer for the F-22, making it even more lethal and survivable in combat." The unit's flagship, tail number 4115, is the first aircraft to be equipped with the modifications, which add a...
  • Lockheed welcomes Norway backing of F-35 fighter

    03/23/2012 7:22:44 PM PDT · by U-238
    Baltimore Sun ^ | 3/23/2012 | Andrea Shalal-Esa
    Lockheed Martin Corp on Friday welcomed news that Norway planned to increase its order for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jets by four planes, and was considering pulling forward the delivery of two initial training jets by one year to 2015. Lockheed said the move showed the Norwegian government's "trust and confidence" in the F-35 program, and pledged to work closely with the Norwegian government to accommodate and implement its revamped plans. Lockheed is developing three variants of the radar-evading new fighter for the U.S. military and the eight partner countries that are helping fund its development: Britain, Norway, Canada, Denmark,...
  • TEAR JERKER! Dead Daughter's Voicemails Erased by Phone Company

    03/23/2012 12:06:48 PM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 50 replies · 1+ views
    ABC News ^ | March 23, 2012 | By ASHLEY JENNINGS
    For 51-year-old Faron Butler, the thing he cherished most after his daughter's death was being able to hear her voice. "Every time I had a bad day or just wanted to listen to her I'd go through my old voicemails," Butler told ABCNews.com through tears. "I had one that I'd play over and over again. She'd be saying 'Daddy, I love you and I miss you.'" He said he was shocked when a few weeks ago he went to hear that familiar voice, only to find out the voicemail had been erased
  • Air Force Will Continue to Launch Mysterious X-37B Space Plane

    03/22/2012 9:00:20 PM PDT · by U-238 · 23 replies · 3+ views
    National Defense Magazine ^ | 3/22/2012 | Stew Magnuson
    What payloads are aboard the Air Force’s X-37B space plane, which has been orbiting the Earth for more than a year, remains top secret. Gen. William L. Shelton, commander of Air Force Space Command, was peppered with questions about its purpose at a gathering of Washington, D.C.-based defense reporters March 22. He remained tight-lipped about the mystery spacecraft’s mission, but did say that the service has no intention of purchasing any more of the winged, reusable vehicles, which resemble a smaller version of NASA’s now returned space shuttle. “It is doing very well on orbit,” he said. “It has had...
  • Will Space Battles Be Fought with Laser Weapons?

    03/22/2012 1:34:51 AM PDT · by U-238 · 33 replies · 2+ views
    Life's Little Mysteries ^ | 3/16/2012 | Adam Hadhazy
    What would science fiction be without laser beams? From handheld ray guns to spaceship-mounted turbolasers, the futuristic weapon of choice definitely involves bright, colorful blasts of energy. In the early 21st century, projectiles still remain the standard means of inflicting damage from a distance. Yet continued research into "directed-energy" weapons by the United States military, among others, could someday bring lasers to a battlefield near you. Lasers are already used in guidance, targeting and communication applications, but significant technological obstacles stand in front of turning them into weapons by themselves. For certain niche scenarios, lasers might prove themselves ideal. It...
  • The Return of the Supersonic Biplane

    03/22/2012 1:01:49 AM PDT · by U-238 · 17 replies · 2+ views
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 3/21/2012 | By Michael Belfiore
    In retrospect, the Concorde was doomed from the start. Besides being fuel-hungry, the legendary supersonic jet created sonic booms that were simply too loud for comfort, which prevented the aircraft from flying lucrative overland routes, such as New York to Los Angeles, and kept it an expensive luxury. More than a decade after Concorde was retired, researchers are investigating new ways to build supersonic aircraft by going back to an old idea: the biplane. New research, most recently from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shows promise for solving both major challenges to supersonic transports—cost and noise—by turning to this configuration...
  • ScienceShot: Crystal Clear Nano-Gold

    03/21/2012 11:06:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | Robert F. Service | 21 March 2012
    Credit: Image courtesy of Nature Press Superman has nothing on Jianwei Miao, at least in the vision department. Miao, a physicist at the University of California, Los Angeles, and his colleagues have developed a way to image any type of nanoparticle with unprecedented accuracy. In the picture above, the technique, called electron tomography, shows a gold nanoparticle made up of 3871 atoms. Inside the nanoparticle, the researchers could easily resolve multiple "grains" (green, gold, blue, and red) in which atoms in each grain share a common atomic alignment that is offset from neighboring grains. The technique also manages to...
  • New Test May Predict the Possibility of a Heart Attack

    03/21/2012 8:00:25 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies · 3+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Mar. 21, 2012 | NA
    New findings from a landmark research study led by Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) -- a collaborative program between Scripps Health and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) -- shows a promising new blood test may be useful in helping doctors predict who is at risk for an imminent heart attack. Results of the study, titled "Characterization of Circulating Endothelial Cells in Acute Myocardial Infarction," were published this week in Science Translational Medicine. The study concludes that circulating endothelial cells (CEC) from heart attack patients were abnormally large and misshapen and often appeared with multiple nuclei, which indicates that CECs are...
  • F-35 Reaches Critical Juncture After Strong Year, Official Says

    03/21/2012 4:34:17 PM PDT · by U-238 · 6 replies · 1+ views
    Defense Talk ^ | Wednesday, March 21st, 2012 | American Forces Press Service
    The F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter program -- the centerpiece of future tactical aviation and a key to implementing new military strategic guidance -- made strong progress in its development last year, a defense official said today. Frank Kendall, acting undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, told the House Armed Services Committee that the fighter aircraft is essential to the Defense Department, and that it made "strong progress" in 2011. "Last fall, the department engaged in a strategy and budget review, where everything -- and I do mean everything -- was on the table," Kendall said. "After...
  • F-22 fighter jets retrofitted after Alaska crash

    03/21/2012 4:18:43 PM PDT · by U-238 · 4 replies
    Fox News ^ | 3/21/2010 | Associated Press
    Air Force is replacing handles that engage the F-22 Raptor fighter jet's emergency oxygen system after pilots reported feeling lightheaded and the death of a captain whose $143 million aircraft took a nosedive into a mountain range in Alaska. Capt. Jeffrey Haney was killed in November 2010 during a night mission about 100 miles north of Anchorage. An accident investigation found that the plane's controls and switches contributed to the crash, particularly an emergency oxygen system activation ring on the back edge of the ejection seat. The report found that the two-step process to manually activate the system required the...
  • Military-Funded Brain Science Sparks Controversy

    03/21/2012 1:57:55 AM PDT · by U-238 · 11 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3/21/2012 | Charles Choi
    Brain research and associated advances such as brain-machine interfaces that are funded by the U.S. military and intelligence communities raise profound ethical concerns, caution researchers who cite the potentially lethal applications of such work and other consequences. Rapid advances in neuroscience made over the last decade have many dual-use applications of both military and civilian interest. Researchers who receive military funding — with the U.S. Department of Defense spending more than $350 million on neuroscience in 2011 — may not fully realize how dangerous their work might be, say scientists in an essay published online today (March 20) in the...
  • The Science of Rail Guns

    03/20/2012 9:44:57 PM PDT · by U-238 · 43 replies
    i09 ^ | 3/20/2012 | Keith Veronese
    Ubiquitous in science fiction, rail guns are a hot area of military research in real life too. But will we ever really get to use them the way people in science fiction do? And could rail guns be used for a non-violent reason — inexpensively launching payload into space? Halo Reach ends with your Spartan taking up a mounted rail gun to destroy an incoming Covenant ship. Rail guns are the basis for a funny aside in Mass Effect 2. They're used in Babylon 5 and Stargate Atlantis and The Last Starfighter. And they're a devastating hand-held weapon in the...
  • Retest of neutrino speed suggests Einstein was right, after all

    03/19/2012 4:22:37 PM PDT · by U-238 · 16 replies · 1+ views
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 3/19/2012 | By Clara Moskowi
    Six months after physicists shocked the world by announcing they'd found particles seemingly traveling faster than light, the growing scientific consensus seems to be that the results were flawed. Neutrinos are the vampires of physics. Researchers at the ICARUS project in Italy have recreated an independent version of the original Switzerland-based experiment, called OPERA, and found that their particles traveled at a respectable, sub-light speed. Though the results don't automatically disprove OPERA's findings, they add to most scientists' sense that the shocking finding was an anomaly "The evidence is beginning to point towards the OPERA result being an artifact of...
  • Message Encoded in Neutrino Beam Transmitted through Solid Rock

    03/18/2012 11:29:14 PM PDT · by U-238 · 18 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 3/16/2012 | John Matson
    Neutrinos are having a moment. They’re speeding across Europe (just how fast is under review), they’re changing flavors in China and, now, they’re carrying rudimentary messages through bedrock in Illinois. A team of physicists encoded a short string of letters on a beam of neutrinos at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill., and sent the message to a detector more than a kilometer away. On the journey the neutrinos passed through 240 meters of solid rock, mostly shale. What was the word they transmitted in the preliminary demonstration? “Neutrino.” The experiment is described in a paper posted to the...
  • Pakistani dad braves odds for daughter's treatment

    03/17/2012 4:06:00 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 9 replies
    The Times of India ^ | March 18, 2012 | Kounteya Sinha
    Malik Sarsa Khan had lost five children before. So when his daughter Samreen Fatma (3), who was born seven years after the death of his last child, was diagnosed with liver cancer, Khan, a Pakistani driver, decided to "beg, borrow or steal" to fund her liver transplant surgery in India. Though the government of Punjab in Pakistan stepped in to help him financially, he was robbed off at gunpoint in the Pakistani border city of Lahore while on his way to India. A determined Khan, somehow, managed to reach Apollo Hospital in Delhi. When finding a liver donor became difficult,...
  • Lockheed upgrading Tomahawk system

    03/16/2012 1:00:13 AM PDT · by U-238 · 1+ views
    UPI ^ | 3/14/2012 | UPI
    The control system for U.S. Navy Tomahawk cruise missiles is being upgraded by Lockheed Martin. The company, which didn't announce the monetary value of the modernization effort, said work will focus on the Tactical Tomahawk Weapons Control System, which allows the preparation, control and launch of the missiles. The TTWCS is one of three prime components of the Tomahawk system. "Lockheed Martin is a key industry partner and continues to make significant and positive impacts directly supporting the Tomahawk Weapons System and our fleet sailors," said Navy Capt. Joe Mauser, Tomahawk program manager. "Lockheed Martin remains committed to enhancing the...
  • Defending the F-35

    03/16/2012 12:44:48 AM PDT · by U-238 · 9 replies · 1+ views
    Windsor Star ^ | 3/15/2012 | Bryan Mack
    am tired of hearing the endless rhetoric about Canada's purchase of the F-35, so let's talk straight. John Lameck's recent letter, "Single engine, single-minded," attempts to disparage Canada's choice of the F-35 with some criticisms that are patently false. He seems to suggest that Russian radars "see" in the millimetric range, enabling them to discern the size of aircraft. In fact, I believe the radars to which he is referring actually "operate" in the millimetric band of the radio frequency spectrum; their ability to discern the size of an object is more a consequence of the radar's design than its...
  • F-35A Completes Second Local Sortie at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    03/16/2012 12:39:08 AM PDT · by U-238 · 1 replies
    JSF.mil ^ | 3/14/2012 | United States Air Force
    U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Joseph Bachmann successfully piloted the second F-35 local orientation flight in the skies above the Emerald Coast today. AF-13, an F-35A conventional takeoff and landing variant, launched at 2:30 p.m. CDT and completed a 93-minute flight landing at 4:03 p.m. CDT. At its operational peak, the F-35 Integrated Training Center at Eglin Air Force Base will train approximately 100 F-35 pilots and 2,200 maintainers annually. The wing's two F-35 pilots, in conjunction with its integrated team of military members, civilians and contractors, will begin to slowly build up their number of sorties with an initial goal...
  • National Lab Seeks Partner to Commercialize Self-Guided Bullet

    03/15/2012 7:05:29 PM PDT · by U-238 · 17 replies
    Wharton Aerospace ^ | 2/02/2012 | Wharton Aerospace
    Sandia National Laboratories is seeking a partnership with a private company to commercialize a new guided bullet that its engineers have invented, according to the U.S. government lab, which is managed by Lockheed Martin. The Sandia researchers, Red Jones and Brian Kast and their colleagues, created a dart-like self-guided bullet for small-caliber firearms that uses laser guidance to hit targets more than a mile away. "We have a very promising technology to guide small projectiles that could be fully developed inexpensively and rapidly," Jones said. The prototype was built using commercially available components and the initial testing in computer simulations...
  • US Army to soldiers: 'Check-ins' can kill

    03/15/2012 12:52:01 AM PDT · by U-238 · 5 replies
    MSNBC ^ | 3/15/2012 | Athima Chansanchai
    While the U.S. Army knows its soldiers live in the modern world and carry location-aware, socially networked smartphones, it is reiterating the dangers of broadcasting too much information, because oversharing could cost lives. "Someone with the right software and the wrong motivation could download the photo and extract the coordinates from the metadata." As civilians, we're constantly giving out warnings about the dangers of revealing real-time locations via Facebook and Foursquare check-ins, or via tweets. We also tell you how to disable location tracking in your smartphones. Not only does it make individuals vulnerable to stalking, but also to robbery...
  • Bombs vs Bunkers in a Potential Iran Attack

    03/15/2012 12:45:10 AM PDT · by U-238 · 24 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 3/15/2012 | Sharon Weinberger
    The United States and Iran have engaged in a war of words over their military capabilities in the last few weeks. But if an actual war breaks out, it will not be a war of U.S. bombs versus Iranian bombs, but of U.S. bombs versus Iran's bunkers. Iran's network of nuclear facilities, some of which are underground, would be the primary target of an Israeli or U.S. attack intended to destroy Iran's suspected clandestine weapons program. As the rhetoric has heated up, the United States has been talking up its military capabilities. Whether American or Israeli bombs indeed could penetrate...
  • Lockheed begins test flights of final F-22

    03/14/2012 9:34:54 PM PDT · by U-238 · 19 replies
    Flight Global ^ | 3/14/2012 | Dave Majumdar
    The last F-22 Raptor to be built for the US Air Force took-off on its inaugural test flight earlier today with a company pilot at the helm, a Lockheed Martin executive says. "I was just watching the take-off of aircraft 4195, so it's now made its first flight on its way to delivery," says Jeff Babione, Lockheed's F-22 programme manager. "We just had everyone outside the building watching the take-off of the final Raptor." Lockheed test pilot Bret Luedke-- a veteran aviator who has flown almost every Raptor the company has ever built--is flying the aircraft. Babione says that company...
  • Teenager Unlocks Potential Pathways for Breast Cancer Treatments, Wins Intel Science Talent Search

    03/14/2012 9:04:47 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 2 replies
    MarketWatch ^ | March 13, 2012 | MarketWatch
    Nithin Tumma, whose research could lead to less toxic and more effective breast cancer treatments, received the top award of $100,000 at the Intel Science Talent Search 2012, a program of Society for Science & the Public. From medical treatments to alternative energy solutions, innovation has been top of mind in our nation's capital this week. Honoring high school seniors with exceptional promise in math and science, Intel Corporation and Society for Science & the Public (SSP) recognized the winners of the nation's most elite and demanding high school research competition, the Intel Science Talent Search. Nithin Tumma, 17, of...
  • ACC 2-star recognizes Det 1 for F-22 modification

    03/14/2012 6:44:32 PM PDT · by U-238 · 2 replies
    USAF Air Education and Training Command ^ | 3/7/2012 | Capt. Tristan Hinderliter
    The Air Combat Command director of operations visited a detachment at Luke on Monday to recognize the unit for designing an important safety feature for the F-22 Raptor. "This is really an important thing you have done for the Air Force and the F-22 fleet," Maj. Gen. Charles Lyon, ACC director of operations, told leadership at Detachment 1, ACC Training Support Squadron, a tenant unit at Luke. The modification is to the F-22's Emergency Oxygen System handle, which makes it easier for the pilot to access. Det 1 model makers Floyd Slinker and Terry Waugh designed it. Approximately 200 handles,...
  • Dear Microsoft: You’re doing it right

    03/14/2012 6:22:35 AM PDT · by for-q-clinton · 23 replies
    BGR ^ | 13 Mar 2012 | Zach Epstein
    Late last summer, I wrote an article titled Dear tablet makers: You’re doing it wrong in which I shared my view on what I believe to be one of the biggest problems currently facing tablet vendors. In this article, I postulated that most Android tablets failed to make a splash because, in a nutshell, they bring nothing new to the table. Of course Android offers a vastly different user interface and user experience as compared to Apple’s market-leading iPad, but in terms of true differentiation — unique and desirable features offered to tablet buyers that cannot be found on the...
  • Lockheed could accommodate UK reversal on F-35 variant

    03/13/2012 5:36:34 PM PDT · by U-238 · 5 replies
    Flight Global ^ | 3/15/2012 | Craig Hoyle
    A possible UK decision to reverse a variant switch on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter would not cause a problem for Lockheed Martin, according to one of the company's senior programme officials. Speculation has mounted over recent weeks that the UK government could backtrack on its decision to shift its interest in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B to the C-model carrier variant. The move was included as part of its Strategic Defence and Security Review of late 2010, but has prompted concerns over the costs involved with modifying the Royal Navy's future Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers with...
  • F-22s Still Gasping For Breath

    03/12/2012 9:11:31 PM PDT · by U-238 · 40 replies
    The Strategy Page ^ | 3./12/2012 | The Stategy Page
    The U.S. Air Force is still having problems with the pilot's air supply in its F-22 fighters. Recently, there were three more cases of F-22 pilots apparently experiencing problems. The term "apparently" is appropriate because the pilots did not black out and a thorough check of the air supply system and the aircraft found nothing wrong. There have been nearly 30 of these "dizziness or disorientation" incidents in the last four years. That's about one incident per hundred sorties. Only one F-22 has been lost to an accident so far and, while that did involve an air supply issue, it...
  • The Lost Siblings of the Sun

    03/12/2012 3:32:13 PM PDT · by U-238 · 28 replies · 1+ views
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 3/10/2009 | Alan MacRobert
    Most stars are born in clusters rather than singly, and there’s plenty of evidence that the Sun was too. For one thing, the material of the infant solar system (as preserved in the earliest meteorites) was enriched by fresh supernova debris from at least one very young, massive star (having 15 to 25 solar masses) that exploded less than 5 light-years away, no more than 2 million years after the Sun's formation. Today no such massive star exists within 300 light-years of the Sun. Clearly, the early solar system had stars close around it. But that was 4.57 billion years...
  • DARPA Unveils Drone-Slaying War Laser

    03/11/2012 10:30:14 PM PDT · by U-238 · 38 replies
    Fast Company ^ | 3/08/2012 | Neil Ungerleider
    DARPA is unveiling a portable laser weapons system, HELLADS, which seems like something out of a sci-fi movie. The new laser application, created by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems with a custom power system from Saft Batteries, will help change the way the American military fights future wars. Current military laser systems are bulky contraptions which are mainly the size of a passenger jet, while the proposed DARPA weapon can fit on the back of a flatbed truck. The 150-kilowatt, solid state laser weapon is strong enough to take down drones or other aerial targets; a prototype is expected to be...
  • Iron Dome ups its interception rate to over 90%

    03/11/2012 6:40:29 PM PDT · by U-238 · 34 replies
    the Jerusalem Post ^ | 3/10/2012 | Yaakov Katz and Yaakov Lappin
    The Israel Air Force’s Iron Dome rocket-defense system intercepted 27 rockets fired from the Gaza Strip over the weekend, raising the interception rate from 75 percent last year to over 90%. Israel currently has three Iron Dome batteries in operation – in Ashkelon, Ashdod and Beersheba – and plans to deploy the fourth in the coming months. Its plan is to deploy a total of nine batteries by mid-2013. The battery in Ashdod intercepted 11 rockets out of 13 fired into the city; the battery in Ashkelon intercepted one rocket and purposely did not intercept four others since they were...
  • Hydrogen takes a new form

    03/10/2012 10:36:13 PM PST · by U-238 · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | 3/1/2012 | Alexandra Witze
    Squeezing hydrogen at extreme pressures changes it into a mix of honeycombed atoms layered with free-floating molecules — an entirely new state of the element and the first new phase found in decades. If confirmed, the discovery will be only the fourth known phase of hydrogen, the simplest element and one long probed for basic insights into the nature of matter. “I think we have pretty bulletproof evidence that there is a new phase,” says Eugene Gregoryanz of the University of Edinburgh, leader of the team that will report the work in an upcoming Physical Review Letters. Hydrogen’s first three...
  • China's J-20 Stealth Fighter Is Already Doing A Whole Lot More

    03/10/2012 6:49:38 PM PST · by U-238 · 54 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 3/9/2012 | Eloise Lee and Robert Johnson
    New pictures of the China's J-20 Mighty Dragon stealth fighter have surfaced and are making their way across military blogs. This newest round of photos show the J-20 in the skies somewhere over mainland China. The prototype is said to be using the Saturn AL-31 turbofan engine developed by the Russian's for their Su-27 air superiority fighter. Reuben Johnson at The Washington Times reports the Chinese may be as much as 10 years away from producing an original stealth engine to slip into the J-20. In the meantime, they'll have to take comfort in the fact that while the F-22...
  • Loose fasteners blamed for F-35 fuel leak

    03/10/2012 6:19:02 PM PST · by U-238 · 14 replies
    NWF Daily News ^ | 3/9/2012 | NWF Daily News
    Maintainers with the 33rd Fighter Wing have determined that three loose fasteners caused the small fuel leak during the F-35’s first mission flight Tuesday. The wing’s first F-35A Joint Strike Fighter took off at 10:07 a.m. for what was supposed to be a 90-minute flight. The sortie was cut short to roughly 20 minutes when the pilot of an F-16 acting as a chase plane spotted what appeared to a small fuel leak on the F-35. Maintainers with the 33rd Fighter Wing conducted an extensive review of the jet and determined three slightly loose fasteners allowed a small amount of...