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  • Hitler's Super Gauge Train

    03/08/2014 9:28:41 AM PST · by varmintman · 66 replies
    On the off chance you might encounter people who don't understand why George Soros and Monsanto might want the Ukraine.... The official title of the tsars was "Tsar of all the Russias", meaning primarily 'Great Russia' (Russia), 'White Russia' (Belorus), and 'Little Russia' (Ukraine). That is the heart of the Slavic Orthodox world and Ukraine is the breadbasket of that world. The Ukraine could feed everybody from the Volga to the Atlantic and that in fact was Hitler's plan; the idea was to build a super-gauge train to haul foodstuffs from Ukraine to Europe and, as I read it at...
  • Human origins on Jupiter's moon system?

    Thunderbolts.info and Red Ice both deal in strange stuff. This may be the strangest thing you'll find on either or both of them any time soon. At least the Red Ice interview seems logically coherent. http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=12145 http://www.redicecreations.com/radio/2013/04/RIR-130421.php Definitely a different take on human origins...
  • Neanderthals' large eyes 'caused their demise'

    03/25/2013 10:21:41 AM PDT · by varmintman · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 12 March 2013 Last updated at 20:50 ET | By Pallab Ghosh
    Neanderthal skulls and brains were a bit larger than ours but they were not inventive like humans, and presumably not as bright. Their basic tool-kits and technology never changed from the first day they walked the Earth to the last. There has always been a question of what they were doing with the larger brains and new studies appear to shed some light on the question: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130319093639.htm http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21759233 ...Results imply that larger areas of the Neanderthal brain, compared to the modern human brain, were given over to vision and movement and this left less room for the higher level thinking...
  • Neanderthal: New Images of an Ancient Enemy

    03/18/2012 5:24:33 PM PDT · by varmintman · 147 replies
    Danny Venderamini's main site.Vendramini thesis on Youtube. All Neanderthal images here courtesy of www.themandus.org This thing starts off with Danny Vendramini figuring out something which should have been figured out 100 years ago i.e.. that (other than for the larger brain area) a Neanderthal skull is a near perfect match for ape profiles and a very bad match for one of ours: That is consistent with what we know about Neanderthal DNA i.e. that it's no closer to ours than to an ape's. The funny thing is that Vendramini did not tell his artist to produce the world's scariest monster,...
  • Even parity error checking in DNA/RNA

    06/19/2011 7:49:38 AM PDT · by varmintman · 6 replies
    http://www.reasons.org ^ | Keith McPherson
    http://www.reasons.org/tnrtb/2008/12/05/error-control-coding-in-biology-implies-design-part-3-of-5/ http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2002/CC/b205631c "The purine–pyrimidine and hydrogen donor–acceptor patterns governing nucleotide recognition are shown to correspond formally to a digital error-detecting (parity) code, suggesting that factors other than physicochemical issues alone shaped the natural nucleotide alphabet." Implications of this one should be fairly obvious...
  • Neanderthal Bone Could Push Back Evolution of Complex Speech

    01/02/2014 8:44:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology mag`` ^ | January 02, 2014 | editors
    The near-complete skeleton of a 60,000 year-old adult male Neanderthal found in a cave in Israel contains a bone in the area of the throat whose shape and relation to other bones suggest it provided modern human's extinct relatives with the capability for complex speech. The Neanderthal's horseshoe-shaped hyoid bone has a similar appearance to that of modern humans. It is wider than in non-human primates, like chimpanzees, that cannot make human-like vocalizations. An international team of scientists created a computer model of the Neanderthal hyoid and showed that its positioning would have likely allowed the hominins to speak. Further,...
  • "Cave men"

    Interesting counter argument to the recent claims of human/hominid interbreeding from Max Planck: http://cosmosincollision.com/forum/index.php?topic=57.0 ...Cosmos in Collision includes a claim that there are two basic human groups on the planet, i.e. Cro Magnon descendants, and descendants of the familiar antediluvian people of the Bible including IndoEuropean, Semitic, and Hamitic groups. The difference has nothing to do with race or color since both groups are capable of producing any color or feature you'd ever see in humans. The difference was in the original cultures and technologies, the most major such difference being the question of stone tools. There was never any...
  • Second Solar System Like Ours Discovered

    11/27/2013 7:30:51 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | November 27, 2013 | Shannon Hall on
    KOI-351 is “the first system with a significant number of planets (not just two or three, where random fluctuations can play a role) that shows a clear hierarchy like the solar system — with small, probably rocky, planets in the interior and gas giants in the (exterior),” Dr. Juan Cabrera, of the Institute of Planetary Research at the German Aerospace Center, told Universe Today.
  • Two Basic Human Groups?

    Compared to other animals, humans have very little genetic diversity, e.g. http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/genetics/skin-color/modern-human-diversity-genetics People today look remarkably diverse on the outside. But how much of this diversity is genetically encoded? How deep are these differences between human groups? First, compared with many other mammalian species, humans are genetically far less diverse – a counterintuitive finding, given our large population and worldwide distribution. For example, the subspecies of the chimpanzee that lives just in central Africa, Pan troglodytes troglodytes, has higher levels of diversity than do humans globally, and the genetic differentiation between the western (P. t. verus) and central (P. t....
  • Rejecting Creation the movie: A business decision

    12/10/2009 7:40:29 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 11 replies · 1,160+ views
    CMI ^ | December 10, 2009 | Emil Silvestru, Ph.D.
    Canada’s Macleans news site recently published an article titled “Darwin movie too evolved for U.S. audiences”. The article refers to the decision of US film distributors to “pass” on the film “Creation”—the dramatized story of Charles Darwin’s struggle while writing the Origin of Species. The refusal to distribute a film premiered and acclaimed at the Toronto Film Festival seems to have again roused the Canadian media’s scorn of the “backward Americans” of which—according to Gallup—only 39% believe Darwin and his evolutionary theory. It is interesting how very differently the Canadian and world media treated America during WW II when far...
  • Does Science Have a Magisterium?

    12/10/2009 4:24:15 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 134 replies · 2,686+ views
    The American ^ | December 9, 2009 | Jay Richards
    At National Review Online, conservative curmudgeon John Derbyshire has weighed in on the Climategate scandal by encouraging conservatives not to jump on the anti-science bandwagon. I share his worry and find his advice is good so far as it goes; but I think Derbyshire’s defense of science might actually encourage the skepticism he wants to prevent. Most of the trouble comes from his invocation of the word “science,” and his claim that science has a magisterium.His article is called “Trust Science.” I’m not sure what that means. What is “science,” and how do we “trust” it? Imagine if someone said:...
  • Biologic InstituteDesign without a Designer? (Hold onto your hat!!! Evos invite IDers to...)

    12/10/2009 11:03:19 AM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 32 replies · 1,185+ views
    Biologic Institute ^ | December 9, 2009 | Douglas Axe
    Last February I mentioned the events that would commemorate the life and work of Charles Darwin in 2009. I had no idea at the time that I would be invited to participate in one of these events. But there I was, precisely 150 years after On the Origin of Species first appeared, seated with other scientists in front of a packed room that featured, among other interesting things, a life-sized model of a baleen whale. The venue was the National Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany, and the occasion was a panel discussion titled Design without a Designer? [1]...
  • New Finch Species Shows Conservation, Not Macroevolution

    12/09/2009 6:13:57 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 12 replies · 665+ views
    ICR News ^ | December 9, 2009 | Brian Thomas, M.S.
    “Darwin’s finches” are a variety of small black birds that were observed and collected by British naturalist Charles Darwin during his famous voyage on the H.M.S. Beagle in the early 1800s. Years later, Darwin argued that subtle variations in their beak sizes supported his concept that all organisms share a common ancestor (a theory known as macroevolution). The finches, whose technical name is Geospiza, have since become classic evolutionary icons...
  • Can Evolution Explain Altruism in Our Children?

    12/08/2009 7:52:39 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 69 replies · 1,806+ views
    ICR News ^ | December 8, 2009 | Brian Thomas, M.S.
    esearch has shown that humans like to help, even before they are old enough to have been taught how to do so. This innate characteristic distinguishes humans from their supposed closest evolutionary family member, the chimpanzee, which doesn’t demonstrate the same altruistic behavior. In studies on the subject, at only 18 months old, toddlers were observed to consistently aid unrelated adults in simple tasks such as opening a door or picking up a clothes pin. Researchers assumed then that altruism, or unselfish concern for the welfare of others, evolved early in humans. But does this conclusion necessarily follow from the...
  • “The Totalities of Copenhagen”

    12/08/2009 12:58:20 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 12 replies · 629+ views
    Uncommon Descent ^ | December 8, 2009 | William Dembski
    “The Totalities of Copenhagen” William Dembski Bret Stevens’ article today in the WSJ, “The Totalities of Copenhagen,” again shows the strong parallels between the global warming debate and the evolution debate, especially with the proclivity of AGW and evolution advocates to quash all dissent. Consider, from his piece, the following characteristics of the AGW advocates: ...
  • Raising the Banner for Creation Truth (according to the evos, these men and women aren't scientists)

    12/07/2009 8:33:19 AM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 234 replies · 3,999+ views
    ICR ^ | December 2009 | Various Authors
    Dr. Henry M. Morris founded the Institute for Creation Research in 1970 with a vision to uncover and present evidence for the accuracy and authority of the Bible. For almost 40 years, ICR has distinguished itself as the leader in creation science research and education, ably assisted by the many fine scientists whom God has led to work here. These men and women have dedicated their training and skills to raising the banner for the truth of our Creator God. We would like you to meet our current on-site scientists and hear their thoughts on the purpose, significance, and importance...
  • Why young-age creationism is good for science

    12/07/2009 7:30:12 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 170 replies · 3,384+ views
    Journal of Creation ^ | Brett W. Smith
    The current treatment of young-age creationists in the scientific community and society at large is unfair and unwise. Scientists and philosophers of science, including old-age creationists and naturalists, should respect youngage creationists as legitimate contributors to science. Young-age creationists offer to the current origins science establishment a competing rational viewpoint that will augment fruitful scientific investigation through increased accountability for scientists, introduction of original hypotheses and general epistemic improvement...
  • Big Chicken with Sharp Teeth

    07/21/2007 4:05:25 PM PDT · by rickdylan · 43 replies · 1,084+ views
    I looked for an existing FR thread on this one and didn't find one. There were a couple of threads from a year or so ago describing the original find but nothing on the more recent news. Researchers in 2005 broke a tyrannosaur bone in half to get it on a small helicopter which was all they had available and found soft tissue inside the bone including what looked like raw meet, blood vessels, and blood. More recently, collagen and proteins from this bone have been sequenced and turnout to be altogether similar to those of chickens. The tyrannosaur apparently...