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Testing (News/Activism)

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  • A molecule central to diabetes is uncovered

    08/11/2012 3:20:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 8, 2012 | NA
    At its most fundamental level, diabetes is a disease characterized by stress -- microscopic stress that causes inflammation and the loss of insulin production in the pancreas, and system-wide stress due to the loss of that blood-sugar-regulating hormone. Now, researchers led by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) have uncovered a new key player in amplifying this stress in the earliest stages of diabetes: a molecule called thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). The molecule, they've discovered, is central to the inflammatory process that leads to the death of the cells in the human pancreas that produce insulin. "This molecule...
  • New Approach of Resistant Tuberculosis (not exactly)

    08/10/2012 10:36:39 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Aug. 10, 2012 | NA
    Scientists of the Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine have breathed new life into a forgotten technique and so succeeded in detecting resistant tuberculosis in circumstances where so far this was hardly feasible. Tuberculosis bacilli that have become resistant against our major antibiotics are a serious threat to world health. If we do not take efficient and fast action, 'multiresistant tuberculosis' may become a worldwide epidemic, wiping out all medical achievements of the last decades. A century ago tuberculosis was a lugubrious word, more terrifying than 'cancer' is today. And rightly so. Over the nineteenth and twentieth century it took a...
  • Stem-cell pioneer banks on future therapies - Japanese researcher plans cache of induced stem...

    08/10/2012 12:29:09 AM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Nature News ^ | 07 August 2012 | David Cyranoski
    Japanese researcher plans cache of induced stem cells to supply clinical trials. Progress toward stem-cell therapies has been frustratingly slow, delayed by research challenges, ethical and legal barriers and corporate jitters. Now, stem-cell pioneer Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University in Japan plans to jump-start the field by building up a bank of stem cells for therapeutic use. The bank would store dozens of lines of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, putting Japan in an unfamiliar position: at the forefront of efforts to introduce a pioneering biomedical technology. A long-held dream of Yamanaka’s, the iPS Cell Stock project received a boost...
  • 1.5 Million Years of Climate History Revealed After Scientists Solve Mystery of the Deep

    08/09/2012 11:10:33 PM PDT · by neverdem · 20 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Aug. 9, 2012 | NA
    A new study has successfully reconstructed temperature from the deep sea to reveal how global ice volume has varied over the glacial-interglacial cycles of the past 1.5 million years. Scientists have announced a major breakthrough in understanding Earth's climate machine by reconstructing highly accurate records of changes in ice volume and deep-ocean temperatures over the last 1.5 million years. The study, which is reported in the journal Science, offers new insights into a decades-long debate about how the shifts in Earth's orbit relative to the sun have taken Earth into and out of an ice-age climate. Being able to reconstruct...
  • The Roots of Jewishness

    08/09/2012 6:34:33 PM PDT · by neverdem · 34 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 6 August 2012 | Gisela Telis
    Enlarge Image Family ties. Most Jewish populations share a genetic connection, but some groups, such as Ethiopian Jews (pictured here, sharing unleavened bread ahead of Passover), stand alone. Credit: Eliana Aponte/Reuters Scholars of all kinds have long debated one seemingly simple question: What is "Jewishness?" Is it defined by genetics, culture, or religion? Recent findings have revealed genetic ties that suggest a biological basis for Jewishness, but this research didn’t include data from North African, Ethiopian, or other Jewish communities. Now a new study fills in the genetic map—and paints a more complex picture of what it means to...
  • NEW SMART DRUG TO BEAT CRIPPLING PAIN OF ARTHRITIS

    08/09/2012 12:45:30 AM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | August 9,2012 | Jo Willey
    A POTENT new pill has been developed which harnesses the body’s natural inflammation-busting ability to beat crippling arthritis. The “smart” drug not only helps relieve the devastating joint inflammation which leaves sufferers in daily agony but researchers also say it has no side-effects. The breakthrough offers real hope that the hundreds of thousands of Britons struck down by rheumatoid arthritis could soon be treated with a powerful medication which uses their own body to fight the disease naturally. Current drug treatments, once the disease has taken hold, have unpleasant and potentially dangerous side-effects. Methotrexate, or MTX, is the standard treatment...
  • Pfizer and J&J end testing of intravenous bapineuzumab Alzheimer’s treatment

    08/08/2012 10:33:52 PM PDT · by neverdem · 15 replies
    Washington ^ | August 6, 2012 | Associated Press
    NEW YORK — Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnson said Monday they are ending development of an intravenous formulation of a drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease after the treatment failed in two late-stage clinical trials. The companies said bapineuzumab intravenous did not work better than placebo in two late-stage trials in patients who had mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The drug is designed to prevent the buildup of plaque in the brain. J&J said it is not discontinuing development of the compound and noted it has ongoing studies including a mid-stage neuroimaging study with bapineuzumab delivered subcutaneously...
  • Turning White Fat Into Energy-Burning Brown Fat: Hope for New Obesity and Diabetes Treatments

    08/06/2012 1:46:58 AM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Aug. 2, 2012 | NA ,
    Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified a mechanism that can give energy-storing white fat some of the beneficial characteristics of energy-burning brown fat. The findings, based on studies of mice and of human fat tissue, could lead to new strategies for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. The study was published August 2 in the online edition of the journal Cell. Humans have two types of fat tissue: white fat, which stores excess energy in the form of triglycerides, and brown fat, which is highly efficient at dissipating stored energy as heat. Newborns have a relative abundance of...
  • Eye spy cyanide

    08/05/2012 3:43:52 PM PDT · by neverdem · 24 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 3 August 2012 | Francesca Burgoyne poisoning
    The two-step method to detect cyanide. (A) Adding a chemosensor to a blood sample, followed by extracting the purple chemosensor–cyano complex from the sample. (B) Washing the column with water The colour of cyanide poisoning is purple, according to researchers in Switzerland who have developed a method that enables them to quickly detect blood cyanide levels through a simple colour change. Cyanide poisoning as a result of smoke inhalation can have serious or fatal consequences unless an antidote is rapidly administered. Current methods for determining cyanide poisoning, including microdiffusion, microdistillation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection, can take up to an...
  • Finished heart switches stem cells off

    08/04/2012 11:00:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | July 12, 2012 | NA
    It is not unusual for babies to be born with congenital heart defects. This is because the development of the heart in the embryo is a process which is not only extremely complex, but also error-prone. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim have now identified a key molecule that plays a central role in regulating the function of stem cells in the heart. As a result, not only could congenital heart defects be avoided in future, but new ways of stimulating the regeneration of damaged hearts in adults may be opened up....
  • Bacteria-immune system 'fight' can lead to chronic diseases, study suggests

    08/04/2012 7:16:59 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 2, 2012 | NA
    Results from a study conducted at Georgia State University suggest that a "fight" between bacteria normally living in the intestines and the immune system, kicked off by another type of bacteria, may be linked to two types of chronic disease. The study suggests that the "fight" continues after the instigator bacteria have been cleared by the body, according to Andrew Gewirtz, professor of biology at the GSU Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection. That fight can result in metabolic syndrome, an important factor in obesity, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The results were published in the journal Cell Host &...
  • How Blasts Injure the Brain

    08/04/2012 2:01:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 22 July 2011 | Greg Miller
    Enlarge Image Occupational hazard. A new study provides clues about the cellular mechanisms of traumatic brain injury, a signature injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Credit: Adrees Latif/Reuters According to some estimates, more than 300,000 United States troops have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most of these injuries have resulted from blasts from roadside bombs and other explosives planted by insurgents. The lack of knowledge about how an explosive blast injures the brain has hampered efforts to treat these injuries. Now, two studies offer a potentially important insight,...
  • Squabble Over NEJM Paper Puts Spotlight on Antishock Drug

    08/04/2012 1:34:09 AM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 2 August 2012 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    A seemingly small mistake in a paper in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) landed a Danish physician-researcher in hot water last month after a German company threatened to sue him for potential losses that could run in the millions of dollars. The exchange prompted media consternation in Denmark over whether academic freedom was being censored, but the researcher, Anders Perner of Copenhagen University Hospital has corrected the error, which occurred in the publication of a study of a widely used drug to prevent shock, and thereby averted legal action. Still, the episode has shone a light on a...
  • Cancer May Result From Wrong Number of Genes

    08/04/2012 12:52:20 AM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 2 August 2012 | Sarah C. P. Williams
    When a young person develops cancer, doctors most often assume that genetics are the reason, because the patient hasn’t lived long enough to accumulate environmental damage. But it’s been hard to find the faulty DNA behind many tumors. Now, using new genomic technology, scientists have discovered a novel explanation for some testicular cancers, the most common cause of cancer in men under 35. Rather than being triggered by a single gene mutation, the tumors are caused by too many or too few copies of a gene in a person’s cells. These “copy number variations” have been linked to other conditions...
  • Pregnancy alters resident gut microbes

    08/03/2012 11:30:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Nature News ^ | 02 August 2012 | Monya Baker
    Third-trimester microbiota resembles that of people at risk of diabetes. Women's gut microbe populations change as pregnancy advances, becoming more like those of people who might develop diabetes. These changes, which do not seem to damage maternal health, correspond with increases in blood glucose and fat deposition thought to help a mother nourish her child. Although scientists have profiled microbial communities around the world and throughout the human body, this is the first time they have tracked the gut microbiome during pregnancy, says Ruth Ley, a microbiologist at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, who led the work1. Ley had...
  • Panel recommends against ECG tests for heart disease

    08/02/2012 5:38:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Reuters ^ | Jul 31, 2012 | Genevra Pittman
    Testing electrical activity of the heart using an electrocardiogram is unlikely to help doctors figure out who is at risk of coronary heart disease, according to recommendations from a U.S. government-backed panel. The United States Preventive Services Task Force wrote on Monday that there's no good evidence the test, also known as an ECG, helps doctors predict heart risks any better than traditional considerations such as smoking, blood pressure and cholesterol levels in people with no symptoms. "It could potentially be helpful if we had evidence that doing a test like an ECG or an exercise ECG would better classify...
  • TB drugs chalk up rare win

    07/24/2012 2:58:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Nature |ews ^ | 24 July 2012 | Amy Maxmen
    Combination therapy is just one emerging weapon in the fight against tuberculosis. AIDS is infamous for its rampant rise in Africa. Yet the biggest killer of Africa’s HIV-positive population — tuberculosis (TB) — has a much lower profile. Its reach is global: it has appeared in pernicious new drug-resistant forms among addicts, prisoners and impoverished people worldwide. In the face of this deadly march, however, medicine has made little apparent progress. That is now set to change. Earlier this year, two companies filed for regulatory approval for drugs that should enhance existing TB therapies, and at the XIX International AIDS...
  • Dumping iron at sea does sink carbon

    07/24/2012 1:06:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Natue News ^ | 18 July 2012 | Quirin Schiermeier
    Geoengineering hopes revived as study of iron-fertilized algal blooms shows they deposit carbon in the deep ocean when they die. In the search for methods to limit global warming, it seems that stimulating the growth of algae in the oceans might be an efficient way of removing excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere after all. Despite other studies suggesting that this approach was ineffective, a recent analysis of an ocean-fertilization experiment eight years ago in the Southern Ocean indicates that encouraging algal blooms to grow can soak up carbon that is then deposited in the deep ocean as the algae...
  • Mystery Tug on Spacecraft Is Einstein’s ‘I Told You So’

    07/24/2012 3:42:38 AM PDT · by neverdem · 49 replies
    NY Times ^ | July 23, 2012 | DENNIS OVERBYE
    It’s been a bad year to bet against Albert Einstein. In the spring physicists had to withdraw a sensational report that the subatomic particles known as neutrinos were going faster than light, Einstein’s cosmic speed limit; they discovered they had plugged in a cable wrong. Now scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have reported that they have explained one of the great mysteries of the space age, one that loomed for 30 years as a threat to the credibility of Einsteinian gravity. The story starts with the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes, which went past Jupiter and Saturn in...
  • Diabetes drug makes brain cells grow (neural stem cells)

    07/12/2012 5:27:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 30 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | 5-Jul-2012 | NA
    Public release date: 5-Jul-2012 Contact: Elisabeth (Lisa) Lyons elyons@cell.com 617-386-2121 Cell Press Diabetes drug makes brain cells grow The discovery is an important step toward therapies that aim to repair the brain not by introducing new stem cells but rather by spurring those that are already present into action, says the study's lead author Freda Miller of the University of Toronto-affiliated Hospital for Sick Children. The fact that it's a drug that is so widely used and so safe makes the news all that much better. Earlier work by Miller's team highlighted a pathway known as aPKC-CBP for its essential...