Keyword: themoon

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  • Crystal is 'oldest scrap of Earth crust'

    02/24/2014 7:56:24 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 50 replies
    bbc ^ | 24 February 2014
    A tiny 4.4-billion-year-old crystal has been confirmed as the oldest fragment of Earth's crust. The zircon was found in sandstone in the Jack Hills region of Western Australia. Scientists dated the crystal by studying its uranium and lead atoms. The former decays into the latter very slowly over time and can be used like a clock. The finding has been reported in the journal Nature Geoscience. Its implication is that Earth had formed a solid crust much sooner after its formation 4.6 billion years ago than was previously thought, and very quickly following the great collision with a Mars-sized body...
  • Gondwana Supercontinent Underwent Massive Shift During Cambrian Explosion

    08/11/2010 5:32:45 AM PDT · by decimon · 51 replies · 1+ views
    Yale University ^ | August 10, 2010 | Unknown
    New Haven, Conn. — The Gondwana supercontinent underwent a 60-degree rotation across Earth’s surface during the Early Cambrian period, according to new evidence uncovered by a team of Yale University geologists. Gondwana made up the southern half of Pangaea, the giant supercontinent that constituted the Earth’s landmass before it broke up into the separate continents we see today. The study, which appears in the August issue of the journal Geology, has implications for the environmental conditions that existed at a crucial period in Earth’s evolutionary history called the Cambrian explosion, when most of the major groups of complex animals rapidly...
  • Why is the Earth moving away from the sun?

    06/01/2009 6:59:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 69 replies · 1,636+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Monday, June 1, 2009 | Kelly Beatty, Sky and Telescope
    Skywatchers have been trying to gauge the sun-Earth distance for thousands of years. In the third century BC, Aristarchus of Samos, notable as the first to argue for a heliocentric solar system, estimated the sun to be 20 times farther away than the moon. It wasn't his best work, as the real factor is more like 400. By the late 20th century, astronomers had a much better grip on this fundamental cosmic metric -- what came to be called the astronomical unit. In fact, thanks to radar beams pinging off various solar-system bodies and to tracking of interplanetary spacecraft, the...
  • The Curious Case of Missing Asteroids

    03/03/2009 7:31:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies · 720+ views
    NASA Solar System Exploration ^ | February 25, 2009 | Lori Stiles
    University of Arizona scientists have uncovered a curious case of missing asteroids. The main asteroid belt is a zone containing millions of rocky objects between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The scientists find that there ought to be more asteroids there than researchers observe. The missing asteroids may be evidence of an event that took place about 4 billion years ago, when the solar system's giant planets migrated to their present locations. UA planetary sciences graduate student David A. Minton and UA planetary sciences professor Renu Malhotra say missing asteroids is an important piece of evidence to support an...
  • Planets Around Planets?

    06/05/2006 7:32:33 PM PDT · by KevinDavis · 6 replies · 359+ views
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 06/05/06 | Robert Naeye
    June 5, 2006 | Evidence continues to mount that planets can form around very-low-mass objects. In fact, planets might even form around objects that are so low in mass that they themselves could be considered "planets." The latest results, reported at this week's American Astronomical Society meeting in Calgary, Alberta, come from groups led by Ray Jayawardhana (University of Toronto, Canada) and Subhanjoy Mohanty (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics).
  • The Moon may have formed in a nuclear explosion

    01/30/2010 12:03:32 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 30 replies · 787+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | 1/28/10 | Lin Edwards
    (PhysOrg.com) -- A new theory suggests the Moon was formed after a natural nuclear explosion in the Earth's mantle rather than after the impact of a massive object with the Earth, as previously thought. The problem with the impact hypothesis is that simulations calculate the Moon should be composed of 80% impactor and 20% Earth, whereas in fact the isotope ratios of light and heavy elements found in Moon rocks so far examined are virtually identical to those on Earth. The fission hypothesis is an alternative explanation for the formation of the moon, and it predicts similar isotope ratios in...
  • Moon Not Only Has Water, but Lots of It

    10/21/2010 12:05:30 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 19 replies
    Wall Street Jounal ^ | 21 October 2010 | GAUTAM NAIK
    Scientists have discovered significant amounts of water on the moon—about twice the quantity seen in the Sahara Desert—a finding that may bolster the case for establishing a manned base on the lunar surface. In an audacious experiment last year, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration slammed a spent-fuel rocket into a lunar crater at 5,600 miles an hour, and then used a pair of orbiting satellites to analyze the debris thrown off by the impact. They discovered that the crater contained water in the form of ice, plus a host of other resources, including hydrogen, ammonia, methane, mercury, sodium and...
  • Water on the Moon: a Billion Gallons

    10/22/2010 11:23:14 AM PDT · by ColdOne · 38 replies · 2+ views
    ABC News ^ | Oct 21, 2010 | NED POTTER
    Water on the moon? Scientists used to think it was as dry as, well, lunar dust. But after a year of analysis NASA today announced that its LCROSS lunar-impact probe mission found
  • Where on Earth has our water come from?

    10/25/2010 6:37:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Highlights in Chemical Science ^ | Friday October 22, 2010 | Rebecca Brodie
    Evidence that water came to Earth during its formation from cosmic dust, rather than following later in asteroids, has been shown by a group of international scientists. The origin of the abundant levels of water on Earth has long been debated with the main differences in the theories being the nature of the material that carries the water, and whether the water came during or after planet formation. Now, Nora de Leeuw at University College London, UK, and colleagues have used molecular-level calculations to prove that dissociative chemisorption of water onto the surface of olivine rich minerals, such as forsterite,...
  • Moon has liquid core just like Earth...reveal sensors left on surface by astronauts 40 YEARS ago

    01/09/2011 12:03:44 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | January 7, 2011 | Graham Smith
    It's an unlikely marriage between state-of-the-art and 40-year-old technology that has yielded extraordinary results. Signals from seismic sensors left on the lunar surface by Apollo astronauts in 1971 have revealed that the Moon has a liquid core similar to Earth's. Scientists at Nasa applied contemporary seismological techniques to the data being emitted from sensors placed by their colleagues during the U.S. space program's heyday....
  • Astronauts, Artists Agree: Moon Stinks of Gunpowder

    10/26/2010 7:03:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    AOL News ^ | Thursday, October 21, 2010 | Lee Speigel
    You can't breathe on the moon, but now you can smell it. A Scottish printmaker has released a series of works that publicize a fact known to astronauts for decades: The moon smells like gunpowder. Apprentice printer Sue Corke worked with flavorist Steven Pearce of Omega Ingredients and Apollo 16 astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr. to create "scratch-and-sniff" moon prints. NASA has known since the 1970s about the gunpowder-like odor of Earth's natural satellite. Even though there's no air on the moon, one moonwalker, Apollo 14 lunar module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, confirmed to AOL News that the moon smells...
  • Who Needs a Moon?

    05/28/2011 4:43:54 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    Science ^ | 27 May 2011 | Govert Schilling
    BOSTON—The number of Earth-like extrasolar planets suitable for harboring advanced life could be 10 times higher than has been assumed until now, according to a new modeling study. The finding contradicts the prevailing notion that a terrestrial planet needs a large moon to stabilize the orientation of its axis and, hence, its climate. In 1993, French mathematicians Jacques Laskar and Philippe Robutel showed that Earth’s large moon has a stabilizing effect on our planet’s climate. Without the moon, gravitational perturbations from other planets, notably nearby Venus and massive Jupiter, would greatly disturb Earth’s axial tilt, with vast consequences for the...
  • Moon's interior water casts doubt on formation theory

    05/26/2011 5:41:31 PM PDT · by decimon · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | May 26, 2011 | Jason Palmer
    An analysis of sediments brought back by the Apollo 17 mission has shown that the Moon's interior holds far more water than previously thought.The analysis, reported in Science, has looked at pockets of volcanic material locked within tiny glass beads. It found 100 times more water in the beads than has been measured before, and suggests that the Moon once held a Caribbean Sea-sized volume of water. The find also casts doubt on aspects of theories of how the Moon first formed. A series of studies in recent years has only served to increase the amount of water thought to...
  • In the shadow of the Moon

    08/31/2004 8:42:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies · 1,487+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 30 January 1999 | editors
    At 8.45 on the morning of 15 April 136 BC, Babylon was plunged into darkness when the Moon passed in front of the Sun. An astrologer, who recorded the details in cuneiform characters on a clay tablet, wrote: "At 24 degrees after sunrise-a solar eclipse. When it began on the southwest side, Venus, Mercury and the normal stars were visible. Jupiter and Mars, which were in their period of disappearance, became visible. The Sun threw off the shadow from southwest to northeast." If present-day astronomers use a computer to run the movements of the Earth, Moon and Sun backwards...
  • A Celestial Collision

    09/15/2004 9:04:28 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 1,075+ views
    Alaska Science Forum ^ | February 10, 1983 | Larry Gedney
    Early in the evening of June 18, 1178, a group of men near Canterbury, England, stood admiring the sliver of a new moon hanging low in the west. In terms they later described to a monk who recorded their sighting, "Suddenly a flaming torch sprang from the moon, spewing fire, hot coals and sparks." In continuing their description of the event, they reported that "The moon writhed like a wounded snake and finally took on a blackish appearance"... [P]lanetary scientist Jack Hartung of the State University of New York... gathered enough clues to suggest that a large asteroid... might have...
  • Did Earth's Twin Cores Spark Plate Tectonics?

    01/07/2009 9:20:26 AM PST · by BGHater · 40 replies · 1,059+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 06 Jan 2009 | Michael Reilly
    It's a classic image from every youngster's science textbook: a cutaway image of Earth's interior. The brown crust is paper-thin; the warm mantle orange, the seething liquid of the outer core yellow, and at the center the core, a ball of solid, red-hot iron. Now a new theory aims to rewrite it all by proposing the seemingly impossible: Earth has not one but two inner cores. The idea stems from an ancient, cataclysmic collision that scientists believe occurred when a Mars-sized object hit Earth about 4.45 billion years ago. The young Earth was still so hot that it was mostly...
  • Russia to carry out moon missions

    Russia is planning to study the moon intensively with the assistance of unmanned missions after a break of more than 30 years. It will launch the first missions out of four of the “Lunar-Resource” and the “Lunar-Sphere” missions by the end of 2012 and early 2013. They will carry out preparations for the creation of a permanent fully-robotic base on the moon. Such a base will be an essential element for the future manned missions to the moon. Here are more details from Boris Pavlishev. Japan, NASA, the European Space Agency, India and China have launched probes to moon since...
  • STEREO Hunts for Remains of an Ancient Planet near Earth...

    04/15/2009 8:45:07 AM PDT · by TaraP · 21 replies · 838+ views
    NASA ^ | April 9th, 2009
    STEREO Hunts for Remains of an Ancient Planet near Earth April 9, 2009: NASA's twin STEREO probes are entering a mysterious region of space to look for remains of an ancient planet which once orbited the Sun not far from Earth. If they find anything, it could solve a major puzzle--the origin of the Moon. The name of the planet is Theia," says Mike Kaiser, STEREO project scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center. "It's a hypothetical world. We've never actually seen it, but some researchers believe it existed 4.5 billion years ago—and that it collided with Earth to form...
  • The Search for the Solar System's Lost Planet

    04/13/2009 12:21:37 PM PDT · by Vaquero · 54 replies · 989+ views
    yahoo/space.com ^ | 4/13/09 | Clara Moskowitz
    Clara Moskowitz The solar system might once have had another planet named Theia, which may have helped create our own planet's moon. Now two spacecrafts are heading out to search for leftovers from this rumored sibling, which would have been destroyed when the solar system was still young. "It's a hypothetical world. We've never actually seen it, but some researchers believe it existed 4.5 billion years ago — and that it collided with Earth to form the moon," said Mike Kaiser, a NASA scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland...
  • STEREO Hunts for Remains of an Ancient Planet near Earth

    04/10/2009 4:04:43 PM PDT · by decimon · 44 replies · 1,154+ views
    NASA ^ | Apr. 9, 2009 | Dr. Tony Phillips
    April 9, 2009: NASA's twin STEREO probes are entering a mysterious region of space to look for remains of an ancient planet which once orbited the Sun not far from Earth. If they find anything, it could solve a major puzzle--the origin of the Moon. "The name of the planet is Theia," says Mike Kaiser, STEREO project scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center. "It's a hypothetical world. We've never actually seen it, but some researchers believe it existed 4.5 billion years ago—and that it collided with Earth to form the Moon." Right: An artist's concept of one of the...
  • Were Mercury and Mars separated at birth?

    01/19/2009 3:32:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 542+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Monday, January 19, 2009 | unattributed
    Line up Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars according to their distance from the sun and you'll see their size distribution is close to symmetrical, with the two largest planets between the two smallest. That would be no coincidence -- if the pattern emerged from a debris ring around the sun. Brad Hansen of the University of California, Los Angeles, built a numerical simulation to explore how a ring of rocky material in the early solar system could have evolved into the planets. He found that two larger planets typically form near the inner and outer edges of the ring, corresponding...
  • Neptune Might Have Captured Triton

    05/10/2006 12:31:09 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 19 replies · 1,120+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 5/10/06 | Sara Goudarzi
    Neptune's largest moon, Triton, was originally a member of a duo orbiting the Sun but was kidnapped during a close encounter with Neptune, a new model suggests. Triton is unique among large moons in that it orbits Neptune in a direction opposite to the planet's rotation, which long ago led scientists to speculate that the moon originally orbited the Sun. But until now, no convincing theory for how Triton paired with Neptune existed. Gravity might have pulled Triton away from its companion to make it an orbiting satellite of Neptune, researchers report in a new study published in the May...
  • Quakes triggered by tides of solid Earth

    04/06/2009 4:46:14 PM PDT · by decimon · 18 replies · 602+ views
    Discovery ^ | April. 6, 2009 | Michael Reilly
    This high tide is bound to wash away more than just your sand castle. A new study has found that bulges in Earth's crust — solid Earth tides — trigger about 1 percent of earthquakes. As Earth and the moon grind through their gravitational ballet, our planet gets tugged hard near the equator. The force is so strong that as the moon passes overhead each day, it pulls Earth's surface up 11.8 inches.
  • No Moon, no life on Earth, suggests theory

    03/20/2004 7:38:37 PM PST · by Leroy S. Mort · 234 replies · 1,418+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 18 March, 2004
    Without the Moon, there would have been no life on Earth. Four billion years ago, when life began, the Moon orbited much closer to us than it does now, causing massive tides to ebb and flow every few hours. These tides caused dramatic fluctuations in salinity around coastlines which could have driven the evolution of early DNA-like biomolecules. This hypothesis, which is the work of Richard Lathe, a molecular biologist at Pieta Research in Edinburgh, UK, also suggests that life could not have begun on Mars. According to one theory for the origin of life, self-replicating molecules such as DNA...
  • Long-Destroyed Fifth Planet May Have Caused Lunar Cataclysm, Researchers Say

    03/25/2002 2:42:10 PM PST · by vannrox · 154 replies · 4,757+ views
    SPACE dot COM ^ | 18 March 2002 ,posted: 03:00 pm ET | By Leonard David, Senior Space Writer
    Asteroid Vesta: The 10th Planet? Discovery Brightens Odds of Finding Another Pluto Nemesis: The Million Dollar Question HOUSTON, TEXAS -- Our solar system may have had a fifth terrestrial planet, one that was swallowed up by the Sun. But before it was destroyed, the now missing-in-action world made a mess of things. Space scientists John Chambers and Jack Lissauer of NASA's Ames Research Center hypothesize that along with Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars -- the terrestrial, rocky planets -- there was a fifth terrestrial world, likely just outside of Mars's orbit and before the inner asteroid belt. Moreover, Planet V...
  • Landscapes from the ancient and eroded lunar far side

    07/14/2006 8:23:23 AM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 53 replies · 1,293+ views
    European Space Agency ^ | July 14, 2006 | Staff
    This image, taken by the advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA's SMART-1 spacecraft, shows a highly eroded highland area on the lunar far side, close to the equator. AMIE obtained this image on 1 January 2006, from a distance of 1483 kilometres from the surface, with a ground resolution of 134 metres per pixel. The imaged area is centred at a latitude of 4.2º South and longitude 98.4º East. The Moon's rotation is locked to the Earth, that is the Moon always presents roughly the same side to the Earth. We call the side facing the Earth the...
  • An explosion on the Moon

    12/24/2005 8:11:55 AM PST · by jmcenanly · 132 replies · 3,858+ views
    NASA ^ | 12.23.2005
    December 23, 2005: NASA scientists have observed an explosion on the moon. The blast, equal in energy to about 70 kg of TNT, occurred near the edge of Mare Imbrium (the Sea of Rains) on Nov. 7, 2005, when a 12-centimeter-wide meteoroid slammed into the ground traveling 27 km/s. "What a surprise," says Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researcher Rob Suggs, who recorded the impact's flash. He and colleague Wes Swift were testing a new telescope and video camera they assembled to monitor the moon for meteor strikes. On their first night out, "we caught one," says Suggs.
  • Earth's Moon is 'cosmic rarity'

    11/21/2007 1:12:51 PM PST · by Aristotelian · 40 replies · 97+ views
    BBC News ^ | 21 November 2007 | Paul Rincon
    Moons like the Earth's - which are formed in catastrophic collisions - are extremely rare in the Universe, a study by US astronomers suggests. The Moon was created when an object as big as the planet Mars smacked into the Earth billions of years ago. The impact hurled debris into orbit, some of which eventually consolidated to form our Moon. The Astrophysical Journal reports that just 5-10% of planetary systems in the Universe have moons created this way.
  • Moon Is Younger And More Earth-Like Than Thought

    12/20/2007 1:37:02 PM PST · by blam · 25 replies · 114+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 12-19-2007 | Maggie McKee
    Moon is younger and more Earth-like than thought 20:13 19 December 2007 NewScientist.com news service Maggie McKee It's a good thing the Moon doesn't have any feelings to hurt. New research suggests it is actually 30 million years younger than anyone had thought, and that it is merely a 'chip off the old block' of Earth rather than being made up of the remnants of a Mars-sized body that slammed into Earth billions of years ago. That violent impact was thought to have taken place 30 million years after the solar system began to condense from a disc of gas...
  • It Came from Outer Space?

    11/25/2004 5:13:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 972+ views
    American Scientist ^ | November-December 2004 | David Schneider
    Speranza points out another difficulty with the impact-origins theory. Large blocks of limestone sit within the boundaries of the Sirente "crater." Such limestone would not have survived an impact. So if Ormö's theory is correct, one must surmise that somebody set these giant chunks of rock in place since the crater formed. To Speranza, that just didn't make sense. Speranza and colleagues further argue that Ormö's radiocarbon dating gave one age for the main feature (placing it in the 4th or 5th century a.d.) and a completely different age for a nearby "crater" called C9, a date in the 3rd...
  • Moon Has Iron Core, Lunar-Rock Study Says

    12/06/2008 8:51:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 2,063+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | January 11, 2007 | Brian Handwerk
    Deep down, the moon may be more like Earth than scientists ever thought. A new moon-rock study suggests the satellite has an iron core... The moon's core could be a clue to its ancient origins, which have long puzzled astronomers. "Our moon is too big to be a moon," Taylor said. "It's huge compared to the moons we see around other planets, so it has always been suspected that there was something strange in its origin." ...Rock samples from NASA's Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 moon missions of the early 1970s have now shed more light on the moon's origins,...
  • Far side of the moon 'could have been visible from earth'

    01/23/2009 12:23:42 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 23 replies · 685+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 1/21/09 | Kate Devlin
    The far side of the moon could have been visible from earth billions of years ago, a new study suggests.The relative rotations of the moon and the earth mean that only the one side is ever visible. However, scientists believe that the impact of a large asteroid hitting the moon could have flipped it around, turning a different side that we now see towards earth. A study of craters on the far side of the moon suggests that it was hit by a large object around 3.9 billion years ago.
  • Far-Flung Space Crash May Help Solve Mystery of Moon's Formation

    06/16/2007 9:45:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 248+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | March 15, 2007 | Richard A. Lovett
    The crash may also someday create the biggest and brightest comet of all time. Astronomer Michael Brown of the California Institute of Technology found the five fragments while studying the Kuiper belt, located in the solar system's outermost reaches. The fragments resemble 2003 EL61, the Kuiper belt's mysterious third largest object, suggesting all six bodies were formed in a single violent crash, Brown said... Measuring about 930 miles (1,500 kilometers) across, 2003 EL61 had puzzled scientists ever since its discovery, because it's oblong and spins end-over-end so fast that it completes a full revolution every four hours... 2003 EL61 is...
  • New evidence for the Moon's soft middle

    12/27/2004 2:29:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 1,276+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 14 February 2002 | Will Knight
    New calculations that indicate how the Moon's surface and interior react to the gravitational pull of the Earth and the Sun have produced further evidence that molten "slush" exists beneath the lunar surface... The first evidence of a soft region near the Moon's core was found using seismological equipment placed at different places on the surface during the Apollo missions. These found that moonquakes lost their energy when they traveled further than 1,000 kilometers below the Moon's surface. Since 1977, when these measurements ended, there has been no further evidence.
  • When the Days Were Shorter

    10/04/2004 10:31:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies · 2,195+ views
    Alaska Science Forum (Article #742) ^ | November 11, 1985 | Larry Gedney
    Present-day nautilus shells almost invariably show thirty daily growth lines (give or take a couple) between the major partitions, or septa, in their shells. Paleontologists find fewer and fewer growth lines between septa in progressively older fossils. 420 million years ago, when the moon circled the earth once every nine days, the very first nautiloids show only nine growth lines between septa. The moon was closer to the earth and revolved about it faster, and the earth itself was rotating faster on its axis than it is now. The day had only twenty-one hours, and the moon loomed enormous in...
  • Ancient impact may have bowled the Moon over

    10/30/2007 7:39:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 217+ views
    New Scientist ^ | April 17, 2007 | David Powell
    An enormous impact basin located near the lunar south pole may have caused the Moon to roll over early in its history, new research suggests... Called the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin, it is 2500 kilometres wide and 12 kilometres deep and is thought to have been created about 4 billion years ago. Francis Nimmo of the University of California in Santa Cruz, US, believes the impact probably occurred near the Moon's equator. That is because the equator lies in the plane of most other objects in the solar system and therefore would more likely be in a hurtling space rock's...
  • Watch the Moon Meet Venus in the Dawn this Wednesday

    02/24/2014 5:37:34 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 24, 2014 | David Dickinson on
    Are you ready for some lunar versus planetary occultation action? One of the best events for 2014 occurs early this Wednesday morning on February 26th, when the waning crescent Moon — sometimes referred to as a decrescent Moon — meets up with a brilliant Venus in the dawn sky. This will be a showcase event for the ongoing 2014 dawn apparition of Venus that we wrote about recently. This is one of 16 occultations of a planet by our Moon for 2014, which will hide every naked eye classical planet except Jupiter and only one of two involving Venus this...
  • Will SpaceX Super Rocket Kill NASA's 'Rocket to Nowhere'? (Op-Ed)

    02/17/2014 1:50:08 PM PST · by EveningStar · 22 replies
    Space.com ^ | February 10, 2014 | R.D. Boozer
    The private spaceflight company Space X plans to build a rocket so big it would "make the Apollo moon rocket look small,"the company's CEO, Elon Musk, announced on "CBS This Morning"on Feb. 3. The huge rocket would ultimately send colonists to Mars, but what would SpaceX do in the meantime? The company's primary focus right now is giving NASA astronauts access to the International Space Station (ISS) on American vehicles, drastically lowering prices to Earth orbit versus what the Russians are charging, Musk said... This all begs the question: If SpaceX is going to build this gargantuan rocket on its...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Rotating Moon from LRO

    09/16/2013 6:05:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | September 16, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: No one, presently, sees the Moon rotate like this. That's because the Earth's moon is tidally locked to the Earth, showing us only one side. Given modern digital technology, however, combined with many detailed images returned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a high resolution virtual Moon rotation movie has now been composed. The above time-lapse video starts with the standard Earth view of the Moon. Quickly, though, Mare Orientale, a large crater with a dark center that is difficult to see from the Earth, rotates into view just below the equator. From an entire lunar month condensed into...
  • Water Hidden in the Moon May Have Proto-Earth Origin

    09/15/2013 4:30:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Science News ^ | Sep. 10, 2013 | Europlanet Media Centre
    Water found in ancient Moon rocks might have actually originated from the proto-Earth and even survived the Moon-forming event. Latest research into the amount of water within lunar rocks returned during the Apollo missions is being presented by Jessica Barnes at the European Planetary Science Congress in London on Monday 9th September. The Moon, including its interior, is believed to be much wetter than was envisaged during the Apollo era. The study by Barnes and colleagues at The Open University, UK, investigated the amount of water present in the mineral apatite, a calcium phosphate mineral found in samples of the...
  • ‘TransFormers’ Could Beam Light Into Permanently Shadowed Craters

    08/26/2013 2:19:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 26, 2013 | Elizabeth Howell on
    Permanently shadowed craters on the moon or Mercury are one of the most exciting locations to search for water. Because the walls of these craters protect certain spots inside from the rays of the sun, it’s quite possible for ice to lurk inside of there. We’ve found ice on so-called airless worlds because of this trick of geometry. So how about exploring them? What’s the best way to do so? The NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts office suggests using TransFormers to get inside these places. No, not the awesome robots you see in the movies, but still something that has a...
  • Earth's Moon is Rare Oddball

    11/20/2007 7:40:12 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 79 replies · 129+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 11/20/07 | Dave Mosher
    The moon formed after a nasty planetary collision with young Earth, yet it looks odd next to its watery orbital neighbor. Turns out it really is odd: Only about one in every 10 to 20 solar systems may harbor a similar moon. New observations made by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stellar dust clouds suggest that moons like Earth's are—at most—in only 5 to 10 percent of planetary systems. "When a moon forms from a violent collision, dust should be blasted everywhere," said Nadya Gorlova, an astronomer at the University of Florida in Gainesville who analyzed the telescope data in...
  • Evidence of Internal Moon Water Found

    08/27/2013 1:59:14 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 27, 2013 | Jason Major on
    Scientists have detected magmatic water — water that originates from deep within the Moon’s interior — on the surface of the Moon. These findings represent the first such remote detection of this type of lunar water, and were arrived at using data from NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) carried aboard India’s Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter. ... M3 (pronounced “M-cube”) fully imaged the large impact crater Bullialdus in 2009. “It’s within 25 degrees latitude of the equator and so not in a favorable location for the solar wind to produce significant surface water,” Klima explained. “The rocks in the central peak of...
  • No Butts: Police Break Up OC Bar's Bizarre Tradition ( 8,000 People moon Amtrack train )

    07/12/2008 8:41:55 PM PDT · by Hillarys Gate Cult · 51 replies · 2,833+ views
    KNBC.com ^ | July 12, 2008 | Staff
    LAGUNA NIGUEL -- More than 50 law officers were breaking up an estimated 8,000 people drinking alcohol and mooning passing trains late Saturday, as an annual "Moon Over Amtrak" party was shut down due to complaints about public nudity. The event drew a crowd of about 8,000 Saturday along the tracks near Mugs Away Saloon, 27324 Camino Capistrano, but things got out of hand as businesses and residents called in complaints, said Orange County Sheriff's Department spokesman Jim Amormino. California Highway Patrol officers were called in to assist Orange County sheriff's deputies shut down the impromptu event, where thousands of...
  • Everything's looking up for a change

    01/25/2004 12:38:37 PM PST · by harpu · 30+ views
    The Miami Herald ^ | 1/17/04 | ANA VECIANA-SUAREZ
    There's plenty happening right in this world -- Iraqi bombings, Afghan troubles, Mexican summits, Iowa caucuses -- but far from here, up in the sky, mystery beckons. A piece of us has landed on Mars and is sending back mesmerizing postcards. Imagine that: wish you were here messages from the Red Planet. Despite little time and too much work, I find myself gazing up, up, up, away from my desk, away from my computer monitor, elated by curiosity. Since NASA's Spirit rover touched down on a brick-red crater, the evening news has been filled with the details of its attempted...