Keyword: thera

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  • World's Oldest Weather Report Found on 3500-Year-Old Stone in Egypt

    09/04/2014 12:56:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    International Business Times ^ | April 4, 2014 14:51 BST
    A 3,500-year-old inscription on a stone block found in Egypt is what archaeologists say the oldest weather report of the world. The inscription on a six-foot-tall calcite stone, called the Tempest Stela, describes rain, darkness and "the sky being in storm without cessation, louder than the cries of the masses," according to Nadine Moeller and Robert Ritner at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute who have translated the 40-line inscription. The stela's text also describes bodies floating down the Nile like "skiffs of papyrus." "This was clearly a major storm, and different from the kinds of heavy rains that Egypt...
  • Thera eruption in 1613 BC

    12/03/2008 4:12:12 AM PST · by Mike Fieschko · 43 replies · 1,503+ views
    ANA ^ | 12/03/2008 | SIMELA PANTZARTZI
    Two olive branches buried by a Minoan-era eruption of the volcano on the island of Thera (modern-day Santorini) have enabled precise radiocarbon dating of the catastrophe to 1613 BC, with an error margin of plus or minus 10 years, according to two researchers who presented conclusions of their previously published research during an event on Tuesday at the Danish Archaeological Institute of Athens. Speaking at an event entitled "The Enigma of Dating the Minoan Eruption - Data from Santorini and Egypt", the study's authors, Dr. Walter Friedrich of the Danish University of Aarhus and Dr. Walter Kutschera of the Austrian...
  • Pumace As A Time Witness (Archaeology)

    06/23/2008 2:07:42 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 53+ views
    IDW Online ^ | 6-23-3008 | Georg Steinhauser - Mag. Werner Sommer
    Pumice as a Time Witness Technische Universität WienJune 23,2008 Three different pumice samples A chemist of Vienna University of Technology demonstrates how chemical fingerprints of volcanic eruptions and numerous pumice lump finds from archaeological excavations illustrate relations between individual advanced civilisations in the Eastern Mediterranean. Thanks to his tests and to the provenancing of the respective pumice samples to partially far-reaching volcanic eruptions, it became possible to redefine a piece of cultural history from the second millenium B.C. Vienna (TU). During the Bronze Age, between the years 3000 and 1000 B.C., the Mediterranean was already intensely populated. Each individual culture,...
  • Greek Island of Santorini Volcano Erupted in 16th Century

    03/22/2014 4:46:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | March 8, 2014 | Abed Alloush
    According to a recent international study, the volcano of the island Santorini, Greece, erupted in the 16th century BC and not earlier. The survey characterized a number of research studies that took place in the past and have indicated that Santorini's volcano may have erupted a century earlier, as unreliable because the method based on tree-ring measurements that they used, could not provide them with accurate results. An international team of researchers led by Paolo Cherubini from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) has demonstrated in the scientific journal Antiquity, that this method cannot provide...
  • Ancient city of Iasos rises out of the ashes

    09/30/2013 6:11:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Tuesday, September 13 2011 | Dogan News Agency
    Archaeologists working on Iasos on Turkey’s Aegean coast have recently discovered that the ancient city was buried under a mountain of ash caused by the explosion of Mt. Thera on Santorini 3,600 years ago. Excavation works have also revealed a sewage system that was in place in the 4,000-year-old city and tunnels to the city’s theater... Spanu said columns that were found one meter underground provided vital information about the history of the city. “Following the explosion of the volcano Thera, which also caused the destruction of the Minoan civilization on the islands of Crete and Santorini, the ancient city...
  • Fossil Insects Tweak Date of Deadly "Atlantis" Eruption

    08/25/2013 2:52:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    National Geographic ^ | August 22, 2013 | Ker Than
    A new study of insect pests found in an ancient storage jar on the Greek island of Santorini suggests the major volcanic eruption that took place there around 1600 B.C. -- and which may have inspired the legend of Atlantis -- happened in early summer. The "Atlantis" eruption was one of the most significant volcanic eruptions in human history. The blast is credited for not only ending the Minoan civilization, but also for affecting ancient Egypt and other communities around the eastern Mediterranean, explained Eva Panagiotakopulu, a palaeoecologist and fossil-insect expert at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Based on...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 6

    07/25/2013 2:39:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 6, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    Geological testing was done at the site in 2005, for the purpose of placing pillars in solid ground so that the stability of the roof would not be an issue in the event of an earthquake. What they found while using high resolution travel time tomography, a method of getting images from under the surface of the earth using waves of energy, were underground cavities. These were both man made and natural. The man made gaps in the earth were filled with rocks, ceramics, and other items of interest to archeologists. Before drilling the new shafts and setting the pillars...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 5

    07/22/2013 8:06:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 6, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    Although ancient ruins in Akrotiri were discovered in 1860 by workers quarrying volcanic rock for the Suez Canal, large scale excavations there didn't begin until 1967. An archeologist by the name of Spyridon Marinatos suspected there were extensive ruins beneath the farmlands at Akrotiri and wrote about his theory in 1936. Due to the outbreak of World War II and the Greek Civil War, he had to postpone his explorations. Earlier digs in the area had been destroyed by plowing of the fields and there were no written records of where they had taken place or what the findings were....
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii -- part 4

    07/21/2013 11:27:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 4, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    While approximately forty buildings have been uncovered at Akrotiri, there are six that have been given more attention than the others. The architecture and function of each building is different. The largest building uncovered so far, Xeste 4, is three stories high and believed to be a public building because of its dimensions. The staircase had fragments of frescoes on either side depicting males ascending in a procession. The second largest building, Xeste 3, was at least two stories high, with fourteen rooms on each floor. The rooms were decorated with paintings and some had more than one door. One...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 3

    07/20/2013 10:28:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 3, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    With the archeological site at Akrotiri closed, and no firm date set for it to reopen, many visitors to the island of Santorini have been disappointed not to see what is inside the Akrotiri enclosure. Although it doesn't replace seeing the amazing number of buildings that have been uncovered, around 40 so far, the museums on the island hold a fair amount of artifacts and photographs of wall paintings. If archeology is at the top of your list of reasons for visiting Santorini, here are some helpful phone numbers to call and confirm hours and days they are open. The...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 2

    07/07/2013 6:45:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | August 29, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    The excavations at the archeological site at Akrotiri in Santorini are ongoing, so there is scaffolding everywhere and supports in place to stabilize walls, windows and doorways that might otherwise collapse. You need to use your imagination to put yourself back in prehistoric times, but with the help of guides or signs posted along the walkways, you can get a fair idea of what life was like. An excavated toilet, pictured in the slide show, has been left in view for the amusement of the tourists and to demonstrate how advanced the plumbing and drainage system was. The inhabitants had...
  • Which volcanoes impacted ancient climate? Sulphur tells the story

    02/14/2013 2:57:27 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    The Register ^ | 14th February 2013 03:57 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A staple complaint of the climate sceptic, that it’s impossible to determine the impact of historical volcanic eruptions on the climate, is a step closer to being spiked, courtesy of work at the University of Copenhagen. The university’s Matthew Johnson, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry, has published work conducted with the Tokyo Institute of Technology in which he uses the isotopes captured in old sulphur to determine the scale of eruptions. As explained in the university’s announcement, the work is designed to resolve the often-conflicting dates attached to recorded eruptions. Dating is difficult from ancient records, since...
  • Atlantis: The Evidence [ Thera, Crete, the usual modern myths ]

    05/20/2012 5:46:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Watchumentary ^ | January 1st, 2011 | BBC, Timewatch, Natalie Maynes, Bettany Hughes
    In this Timewatch special, historian Bettany Hughes unravels one of the most intriguing mysteries of all time. She presents a series of geological, archaeological and historical clues to show that the legend of Atlantis was inspired by a real historical event -- the greatest natural disaster of the ancient world. She is tracing the origins of the Atlantis myth and presenting evidence that the Thera eruption inspired Plato's account of the mystical land. 2,400 years ago Greek philosopher Plato wrote of an ancient island civilization of unparalleled wealth and splendor, which was struck by earthquakes and floods and was swallowed...
  • 'Decoding' the Bible (Movie: Exodus Decoded)

    07/13/2006 7:10:31 AM PDT · by Between the Lines · 5 replies · 1,253+ views
    Jerusalam Post ^ | July 12, 2006 | Gershom Gale
    There is a saying that when it comes to the Bible, "for those who believe, no explanation is necessary, while for those who don't believe, no explanation is possible." But what of the many people who fall somewhere between these two certainties? Such people owe it to themselves to see The Exodus Decoded, a 90-minute documentary by Canadians James Cameron (the director of Titanic, Aliens and The Terminator) and investigative journalist and producer Simcha Jacobovici. The film will be screened at 6 p.m. this evening as part of the Jerusalem Film Festival at the Jerusalem Cinematheque. The Exodus Decoded claims...
  • Olive branch solves a Bronze Age mystery

    04/28/2006 5:59:40 AM PDT · by The_Victor · 14 replies · 737+ views
    Yahoo/MSNBC (Science) ^ | 3:04 p.m. ET April 27, 2006 | Kathleen Wren
    WASHINGTON - Compared to the well-studied world of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the civilizations that flourished in the eastern Mediterranean just before Homer’s time are still cloaked in mystery. Even the basic chronology of the region during this time has been heatedly debated. Now, a resolution has finally emerged -- initiated, quite literally, by an olive branch.Scientists have discovered the remains of a single olive tree, buried alive during a massive volcanic eruption during the Late Bronze Age. A study that dates this tree, plus another study that dates a series of objects from before, during and after the eruption,...
  • ARCHAEOLOGY: New Carbon Dates Support Revised History of Ancient Mediterranean

    04/27/2006 4:59:30 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 77 replies · 2,583+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 4/28/2006 | Michael Balter
    During the Late Bronze Age, the Aegean volcanic island of Thera erupted violently, spreading pumice and ash across the eastern Mediterranean and triggering frosts as far away as what is now California. The Theran town of Akrotiri was completely buried. Tsunamis up to 12 meters high crashed onto the shores of Crete, 110 kilometers to the south, and the cataclysm may ultimately have sped the demise of Crete's famed Minoan civilization. For nearly 30 years, archaeologists have fought over when the eruption took place. Those who rely on dates from pottery styles and Egyptian inscriptions put the event at roughly...
  • Ancient Volcano, Seeds And Treerings, Suggest Rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean History (More)

    04/29/2006 12:24:20 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 723+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 4-28-2006 | Alex Kwan
    April 28, 2006Cornell study of ancient volcano, seeds and tree rings, suggests rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean history By Alex Kwan Separated in history by 100 years, the seafaring Minoans of Crete and the mercantile Canaanites of northern Egypt and the Levant (a large area of the Middle East) at the eastern end of the Mediterranean were never considered trading partners at the start of the Late Bronze Age. Until now. Trenchmaster Vronwy Hankey and foreman Antonis Zidianakis excavate storage jars from the Minoan settlement Myrtos-Pyrgos. The jars were analyzed in the Cornell study using radiocarbon analyses. Cultural links between...
  • Nebra sky disk discarded because of volcanic ash, scientists say By Aug 23, 2010, 15:49 GMT

    08/23/2010 4:41:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 1+ views
    Deutsche Presse-Agentur ^ | Monday, August 23, 2010 | Thomas Schoene
    A catastrophic volcanic eruption spewing huge clouds of ash about 3,600 years ago was behind the burial of the Nebra sky disk, one of the most spectacular archaeological finds in recent years, according to scientists at Mainz and Halle-Wittenberg universities in Germany. The 3,600-year-old disk, discovered in 1999 near the town of Nebra in the eastern German state of Saxony-Anhalt, is the oldest known representation of the night sky. It is thought by some to have been used as an astronomical clock to determine when to add a thirteenth month synchronising the lunar calendar with the solar year. The disk...
  • New analysis on problems between archaeology and pharaonic chronology, based on radiocarbon dating

    06/17/2010 1:57:51 PM PDT · by decimon · 34 replies · 463+ views
    Article by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev professor published in Science magazineBEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL June 17, 2010 -- In a just published article in Science magazine (June 18, 2010), Prof. Hendrik J. Bruins of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev presents novel implications related to new developments in the radiocarbon dating of Pharaonic Egypt. The article reports that, for the first time, it is possible to relate the Minoan Santorini eruption with Egyptian Historical Chronology solely on the basis of radiocarbon dates. Thus, it appears that the eruption preceded the 18th Dynasty and occurred during the Hyksos Period. Moreover, conventional association of...
  • Biblical plagues really happened say scientists [ Thera, global warming, yada yada yada ]

    03/30/2010 7:07:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 513+ views
    Telegraph ^ | March 27, 2010 | Richard Gray
    The Biblical plagues that devastated Ancient Egypt in the Old Testament were the result of global warming and a volcanic eruption, scientists have claimed. Researchers believe they have found evidence of real natural disasters on which the ten plagues of Egypt, which led to Moses freeing the Israelites from slavery in the Book of Exodus in the Bible, were based. But rather than explaining them as the wrathful act of a vengeful God, the scientists claim the plagues can be attributed to a chain of natural phenomena triggered by changes in the climate and environmental disasters that happened hundreds of...
  • A Storm in Egypt during the Reign of Ahmose [The Tempest Stele]

    11/01/2009 8:04:33 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 944+ views
    Thera Foundation ^ | September 1989 (last modified March 26, 2006) | E.N. Davis
    An inscribed stele erected at Thebes by Ahmose, the first Pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty, documents a destructive storm accompanied by flooding during his reign. Fragments of the stele were found in the 3rd Pylon of the temple of Karnak at Thebes between 1947 and 1951 by the French Mission. A restoration of the stele and translation of the text was published by Claude Vandersleyen (1967). In the following year (1968), Vandersleyen added two more fragments, one from the top of the inscription and a small piece from line 10 of the restored text, which had been recovered by Egyptian...
  • In the Mediterranean, Killer Tsunamis From an Ancient Eruption

    11/05/2009 12:15:24 PM PST · by BGHater · 5 replies · 533+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 02 Nov 2009 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    The massive eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean Sea more than 3,000 years ago produced killer waves that raced across hundreds of miles of the Eastern Mediterranean to inundate the area that is now Israel and probably other coastal sites, a team of scientists has found. The team, writing in the October issue of Geology, said the new evidence suggested that giant tsunamis from the catastrophic eruption hit “coastal sites across the Eastern Mediterranean littoral.” Tsunamis are giant waves that can crash into shore, rearrange the seabed, inundate vast areas of land and carry terrestrial material out to...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 1 [of 6]

    11/01/2009 11:02:02 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1,063+ views
    Santa Barbara Cultural Travel Examiner ^ | August 28, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    The site was found by accident when the Suez Canal was being constructed in 1860. Workers quarrying Santorini's volcanic ash discovered the ruins, but serious excavations at the site didn't begin until 1967. An unfortunate collapse of the roof in 2005, which killed a British tourist, caused the site to be closed. It's scheduled to be reopened sometime after 2010. Greek bureaucracy has brought the repairs of the building to a halt, which has caused Santorini's tourist trade to suffer. Akrotiri is referred to by some as the "Minoan Pompeii" because of the similarities of the destruction by volcano and...
  • Real Tsunami May Have Inspired Legend of Atlantis

    10/10/2009 8:07:16 AM PDT · by BGHater · 33 replies · 1,136+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 09 Oct 2009 | Charles Q. Choi
    The volcanic explosion that obliterated much of the island that might have inspired the legend of Atlantis apparently triggered a tsunami that traveled hundreds of miles to reach as far as present-day Israel, scientists now suggest. The new findings about this past tsunami could shed light on the destructive potential of future disasters, researchers added. The islands that make up the small circular archipelago of Santorini, roughly 120 miles (200 km) southeast of Greece, are what remain of what once was a single island, before one of the largest volcanic eruptions in human antiquity shattered it in the Bronze Age...
  • 'Virtual archaeologist' reconnects fragments of an ancient civilization [ Thera ]

    08/15/2008 10:39:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 491+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | Friday, August 15, 2008 | Chandra Shekhar
    Laser Rangefinder: A team of Princeton computer scientists has developed an automated system for reconstructing an excavated fresco, mosaic or similar archaeological object. Collaborating closely with archaeologists in Greece, the team has created a system that employs a combination of powerful computer algorithms and a processing system mirroring the procedures traditionally followed at excavation sites. Here, a fragment is placed on a turntable and a laser rangefinder measures its visible surface from various viewpoints. Credit: Frank WojciechowskiExamining Fresco Fragments In Santorini: Tim Weyrich, a postdoctoral teaching fellow in computer science at Princeton, examines fresco fragments in Santorini. Weyrich is...
  • Greek archaeological site reburied [ Akrotiri Santorini ]

    08/04/2008 10:55:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 295+ views
    Spero Forum ^ | Friday, August 1, 2008 | Stephen Brothwell (Athens News)
    Three year after part of a protective roof collapsed killing a British tourist, the ancient Minoan site of Akrotiri on Santorini remains closed. Excavations have halted and the reconstruction of its roof is stuck in the wheels of bureaucracy. Tourism businesses on the island say they are losing money and prestige as a result. In September 2005, part of a new 1,000m2 roof designed to cover and protect the excavations collapsed without warning, killing Richard Bennion and injuring many others. The site was immediately closed for investigation but inexplicably has remained so for the last 34 months. "I can't say...
  • Did a Tsunami Wipe Out a Cradle of Western Civilization?

    01/15/2008 8:53:15 AM PST · by forkinsocket · 38 replies · 551+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 01.04.2008 | Evan Hadingham
    The effects of the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 are only too well known: It knocked the hell out of Aceh Province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, leveling buildings, scattering palm trees, and wiping out entire villages. It killed more than 160,000 people in Aceh alone and displaced millions more. Similar scenes of destruction were repeated along the coasts of Southeast Asia, India, and as far west as Africa. The magnitude of the disaster shocked the world. What the world did not know was that the 2004 tsunami—seemingly so unprecedented in scale—would yield specific clues to one of...
  • Layers of mystery: Archaeologists look to the earth for Minoan fate

    11/03/2007 11:04:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 110+ views
    Worcester Telegram & Gazette ^ | Sunday, October 28, 2007 | Judy Powell
    While archaeologists have theorized that a volcanic explosion on the island of Thera, 70 miles north of Crete, was responsible for the Minoan downfall, it wasn't until recently that evidence of a massive tsunami, brought on by the eruption, was linked to the mystery... During a recent dig, a team working under Montreal-born scientist Sandy MacGillivray found volcanic ash and strange gravel deposits that looked as if "they had been washed into the site by a violent flood," Mr. Hadingham said. While the ash's composition was identical to that found on the island of Thera, there was no river or...
  • Greece Is The Word For Volcanoes (Thera)

    08/25/2007 9:46:54 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies · 596+ views
    Star Bulletin ^ | 8-25-2007 | Helen Altonn
    Greece is the word for volcanoesA local professor is studying the ancient eruption of Thera By Helen Altonn haltonn@starbulletin.com Floyd McCoy, Windward Community College professor of geology and oceanography, hopes during a year and a half in Greece to resolve the "hugely controversial" question of when the Thera volcano erupted. He will investigate the Mediterranean's largest volcanic eruption in history as a Fulbright scholar. McCoy has spent the past 20 years studying geological evidence of the Late Bronze Age eruption of Thera volcano that led to the end of the Minoan culture on the island of Santorini. Geophysicists say the...
  • The wave that destroyed Atlantis [Destroyed by a giant tsunami?]

    04/22/2007 5:53:44 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 52 replies · 1,240+ views
    BBC On-Line ^ | Friday, 20 April 2007 | Harvey Lilley
    Last Updated: Friday, 20 April 2007, 08:05 GMT 09:05 UK The wave that destroyed Atlantis By Harvey Lilley BBC Timewatch The legend of Atlantis, the country that disappeared under the sea, may be more than just a myth. Research on the Greek island of Crete suggests Europe's earliest civilisation was destroyed by a giant tsunami. Video reconstruction of the tsunami Until about 3,500 years ago, a spectacular ancient civilisation was flourishing in the Eastern Mediterranean. The ancient Minoans were building palaces, paved streets and sewers, while most Europeans were still living in primitive huts. But around 1500BC the people who...
  • A Culture Shaped By Natural Disasters (Thera/Akrotiri)

    01/16/2007 3:33:09 PM PST · by blam · 12 replies · 697+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 1-16-2007 | Christos Doumas
    A culture shaped by natural disasters Archaeologist Christos Doumas says ancient Thera’s civilization was influenced by its response to chronic earthquakes and volcanic explosions Part of a frieze depicting a naval battle in Room 5 of the Western House at Akrotiri. It shows warriors with helmets and rectangular shields. The submerged first floor of a house buried beneath the pumice at Akrotiri. Residents tried to retrieve their belongings and goods after an earthquake, foraging through the ruins. On some occasions, the island’s volcano erupted before Therans could gather anything and so those belongings were buried under pumice. Archaeologists have unearthed...
  • Memory in Ruins [Biblical Archaeology]

    12/01/2003 3:53:28 PM PST · by SJackson · 11 replies · 723+ views
    Azure ^ | Winter, 2004 | David Hazony
    For nearly a century, biblical archaeology has been a pillar of the Jewish national revival. Its professional approach, combined with its often dramatic capacity to reconstruct the history of ancient Israel, has done much to convince the world that the Bible is not mere myth, but a document that reflects the truth concerning central periods in Israel's history. Today, however, biblical archaeology has reached a crossroads. Seeking to reconstruct the historical record from scratch, a new school of Bible scholars, historians, and archaeologists has argued that nearly every major story of the Hebrew Bible is little more than a fabrication....
  • Viewer Beware: The Exodus Decoded [ Jacobovici response to BAR review]

    08/31/2006 10:25:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,973+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | August 29, 2006 | Simcha Jacobovici
    In the second part, he lists what he says are my so-called "discoveries." You would think that the good professor knows how to use the rewind button on his DVD player and confirm statements that he attributes to me. You can find a copy of the transcript of my film at "Simcha's explorations": www.theexodusdecoded.com. A word search can confirm that I claim to "reveal" the meaning of other people's discoveries by providing a new context for looking at various artifacts, inscriptions, mountains etc. The fact is that I never once claim to "discover" anything..
  • Signs Of An Eruption

    08/29/2003 5:37:16 PM PDT · by blam · 107 replies · 6,185+ views
    BBC ^ | 8-30-2003
    Signs of an eruptionFor days before the eruption the volcano had been screaming 'I'm about to explode' Bernard Chouet A scientist has found a way to use earthquakes to predict when volcanoes will erupt. Swiss scientist Bernard Chouet fell in love with volcanoes when he witnessed spectacular fountains of lava spewing from Sicily's Mount Etna in 1969. Now at the US Geological Survey, Chouet has devoted his career to finding a way to predict deadly volcanic eruptions. He is haunted by a disaster in South America that killed 25,000 people. When Colombia's Nevado del Ruiz volcano erupted in 1985, it...
  • Will We Ever Find Atlantis?

    11/16/2003 10:59:39 AM PST · by sarcasm · 12 replies · 1,519+ views
    The New York Times ^ | November 11, 2003 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    omewhere in the imagination, at an intersection of the idealized Golden Age and mankind's descent into manifest imperfection, existed the island civilization of Atlantis. This realm of divine origin was ruled from a splendid metropolis in the distant ocean. Its empire, described by a philosopher as "larger than Libya and Asia combined," enjoyed prosperity and great power.In time, driven by overweening ambition, a common theme in antiquity and not unheard of today, Atlantis set out to conquer lands of the Mediterranean. But in a terrible day and night of floods and earthquakes, Atlantis was swallowed by the sea, sinking into...
  • 'Exodus Decoded' seeks 'plausible explanation' for Biblical events

    08/19/2006 6:32:10 AM PDT · by NYer · 27 replies · 3,235+ views
    The Tidings ^ | August 18, 2006 | David DiCerto
    Did Moses really part the Red Sea like it says in the Old Testament? What about the Nile turning blood red or the plagues that finally compelled Pharaoh to free the Israelites from slavery? Did those things actually happen? These are among the questions Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici attempts to answer in "The Exodus Decoded" which premieres Aug. 20, 8-9:30 p.m. (check local listings) on cable's History Channel. Challenging opinions that dismiss those events as myth, the thought-provoking documentary uses investigative journalism aided by modern science to examine archaeological and geological evidence in separating historical fact from fiction. Jacobovici...
  • Santorini Eruption Much larger Than Originally Believed

    08/23/2006 5:58:47 PM PDT · by blam · 109 replies · 3,769+ views
    University Rhode Island ^ | 8-23-2006 | Todd McLeish
    Santorini eruption much larger than originally believed Media Contact: Todd McLeish, 401-874-7892 Santorini eruption much larger than originally believed; likely had significant impact on civilization KINGSTON, R.I. – August 23, 2006 – An international team of scientists has found that the second largest volcanic eruption in human history, the massive Bronze Age eruption of Thera in Greece, was much larger and more widespread than previously believed. During research expeditions in April and June, the scientists from the University of Rhode Island and the Hellenic Center for Marine Research found deposits of volcanic pumice and ash 10 to 80 meters thick...
  • Biblical Plagues and Parting of Red Sea caused by Volcano

    11/11/2002 12:44:06 PM PST · by Betty Jane · 80 replies · 14,567+ views
    News.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 11/11/02 | John Petre
    Biblical plagues and parting of Red Sea 'caused by volcano' By Jonathan Petre, Religion Correspondent (Filed: 11/11/2002) Fresh evidence that the Biblical plagues and the parting of the Red Sea were natural events rather than myths or miracles is to be presented in a new BBC documentary. Moses, which will be broadcast next month, will suggest that much of the Bible story can be explained by a single natural disaster, a huge volcanic eruption on the Greek island of Santorini in the 16th century BC. Using computer-generated imagery pioneered in Walking With Dinosaurs, the programme tells the story of how...
  • Unprecedented mathematical knowledge found in (Minoan) Bronze Age wall paintings.

    03/02/2006 5:01:38 AM PST · by S0122017 · 51 replies · 2,327+ views
    www.nature.com/news ^ | 28 February 2006 | Philip Ball
    Published online: 28 February 2006; | doi:10.1038/news060227-3 Were ancient Minoans centuries ahead of their time? Unprecedented mathematical knowledge found in Bronze Age wall paintings. Philip Ball Did the Minoans understand the Archimedes' spiral more than 1,000 years before him? A geometrical figure commonly attributed to Archimedes in 300 BC has been identified in Minoan wall paintings dated to over 1,000 years earlier. The mathematical features of the paintings suggest that the Minoans of the Late Bronze Age, around 1650 BC, had a much more advanced working knowledge of geometry than has previously been recognized, says computer scientist Constantin Papaodysseus of...
  • Director posits proof of biblical Exodus

    04/14/2006 5:58:16 AM PDT · by timsbella · 157 replies · 3,529+ views
    The Globe and Mail ^ | 14 April 2006 | Michael Posner
    A provocative $4-million documentary by Toronto filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici claims to have found archeological evidence verifying the story of the biblical Exodus from Egypt, 3,500 years ago. Religious Jews consider the biblical account incontrovertible — the foundation story of the creation of the nation of Israel. Indeed, they celebrated the Exodus Wednesday night and last night with the annual Passover recitation of the Haggadah. But among scholars, the question of if and when Moses led an estimated two million Israelite slaves out of pharaonic Egypt, miraculously crossed the Red Sea ahead of the pursuing Egyptian army and received the Ten...
  • Documentary Sets New Date For Exodus

    07/03/2006 2:26:25 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 1,703+ views
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 7-3-2006 | Etgar Lefkovits
    Jul. 3, 2006 0:15 | Updated Jul. 3, 2006 4:57Documentary sets new date for Exodus By ETGAR LEFKOVITS A new documentary by a Canadian Jewish filmmaker argues that the Exodus did happen, but that it took place a couple of hundred years before the commonly-accepted time frame. The Exodus Decoded, a two-hour documentary by award-winning Israeli-born filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici, suggests that the Exodus of the Jews from Egypt as recounted in the Bible occurred around 1500 BCE, about 230 years before the date most commonly accepted by contemporary historians. The 10 plagues that smote the Egyptians, according to the Bible,...
  • Explorer Ballard heads exploration of undersea volcano

    05/19/2006 12:42:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 279+ views
    Narragansett Times ^ | 5/19/2006 | Chris Church
    University of Rhode Island professor Robert Ballard... was slated to... meet up with the crew of the... 185-foot-long research vessel Endeavor... Ballard, notably known for his 1985 discovery of the Titanic, will be heading up a team of scientists from URI's Graduate School of Oceanography, the Institute for Exploration, and the Institute of Oceanography of the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research in Athens. Scientific operations for the expedition began on Apr. 26 and will continue through June 18... The first leg of the expedition will be to the Greek island of Thera, also known as Santorini, to study the sea...
  • Free Republic "Bump List" Register

    09/30/2001 4:46:44 AM PDT · by John Robinson · 191 replies · 12,118+ views
    I have created a public register of "bump lists" here on Free Republic. I define a bump list as a name listed in the "To" field used to index articles. Free Republic Bump List Register
  • Debate Erupts Anew: Did Thera's Explosion Doom Minoan Crete?

    10/23/2003 2:47:33 PM PDT · by blam · 83 replies · 1,645+ views
    International Herald Tribune ^ | 10-23-2003 | William J. Broad
    Debate erupts anew: Did Thera's explosion doom Minoan Crete? William J. Broad Thursday, October 23, 2003 For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 110 kilometers from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. . This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland...
  • Ireland Is Lost Island of Atlantis, Says Scientist

    08/06/2004 12:41:50 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 84 replies · 3,439+ views
    REUTERS ^ | 8/6/2004 | Kevin Smith
    DUBLIN (Reuters) - Atlantis, the legendary island nation over whose existence controversy has raged for thousands of years, was actually Ireland, according to a new theory by a Swedish scientist. Atlantis, the Greek philosopher Plato wrote in 360 BC, was an island in the Atlantic Ocean where an advanced civilization developed some 11,500 years ago until it was hit by a cataclysmic natural disaster and sank beneath the waves. Geographer Ulf Erlingsson, whose book explaining his theory will be published next month, says the measurements, geography, and landscape of Atlantis as described by Plato match Ireland almost exactly. "I am...
  • Alaska Volcano West of Anchorage Stirs After 12-Year Slumber

    07/28/2004 9:48:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies · 1,731+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 28, 2004 | Associated Press
    ANCHORAGE (AP) - Noting a swarm of tiny earthquakes beneath volcanic Mount Spurr, scientists have warned that the volcano 80 miles west of Anchorage could erupt in the next few weeks. Eruptions most often follow a pattern of quakes, said geophysicist John Power of the U.S. Geological Survey, one of three federal and state partners in the Anchorage-based Alaska Volcano Observatory. Power added, however, that the earthquakes will most likely end without an eruption. Mount Spurr was last significantly active in 1992. In an August explosion that year, it spread a thin layer of ash over Anchorage. The mountain's recent...
  • 50 Ancient Tombs Uncovered (1400BC, Crete)

    07/18/2004 1:17:56 PM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 2,126+ views
    The Australian ^ | 7-18-2004
    50 ancient tombs uncovered From correspondents in Athens July 18, 2004 ARCHEOLOGISTS have discovered 50 tombs dating back to the late Minoan period, around 1400 BC, and containing a number of artifacts on the Greek island of Crete, ANA news agency reported today. The tombs were part of the once powerful ancient city of Kydonia, which was destroyed at the time but later rebuilt. The oldest among them contained bronze weapons, jewellery and vases and are similar to the tombs of fallen soldiers of the Mycenaean type from mainland Greece, said the head of the excavations, Maria Vlazaki. The more...
  • New Ice-Core Evidence Challenges the 1620s age for the Santorini (Minoan) Eruption

    07/29/2004 12:25:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies · 4,057+ views
    Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 1998, Pages 279-289 ^ | 13 July 1997 | Gregory A. Zielinski, Mark S. Germani
    Determining a reliable calendrical age of the Santorini (Minoan) eruption is necessary to place the impact of the eruption into its proper context within Bronze Age society in the Aegean region. The high-resolution record of the deposition of volcanically produced acids on polar ice sheets, as available in the SO42-time series from ice cores (a direct signal), and the high-resolution record of the climatic impact of past volcanism inferred in tree rings (a secondary signal) have been widely used to assign a 1628/1627 age to the eruption. The layer of ice in the GISP2 (Greenland) ice core corresponding to...
  • SCIENTISTS REVISIT AN AEGEAN ERUPTION FAR WORSE THAN KRAKATOA

    10/24/2003 11:14:14 AM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 27 replies · 489+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 21 October 2003 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 70 miles from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland icecap reported evidence that Thera exploded in 1645 B.C., some 150 years before the usual date. That...