Keyword: translators

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  • Jews Need Not Apply to Fight Terror

    11/26/2003 1:05:33 AM PST · by kattracks · 43 replies · 333+ views
    FrontPageMagazine ^ | 11/26/03 | Paul Sperry
    A few weeks after Islamic terrorists toppled the World Trade Center, two FBI agents from the New York field office paid a visit to a Sephardic Jewish community center in Brooklyn. Their mission: recruit Arabic linguists to help interpret interviews and intercepts of Osama bin Laden's network. Sephardic Jews have lived in Arab countries and know the language, not to mention the culture and history of the region. And being close to Israel, the main target of Islamic terrorism, they were gung-ho to help the feds fight the war on terrorism here. It was a good move, or so...
  • Nonsense on Title VI in the L.A. Times

    11/24/2003 8:59:00 AM PST · by JohnathanRGalt · 105+ views
    Sandstorm ^ | Nov. 24, 2003 | Martin Kramer
    Nonsense on Title VI in the L.A. Times Monday, November 24, 2003. Nonsense on Title VI in the L.A. Times. The International Studies in Higher Education Act (H.R. 3077) would create an advisory board for Title VI, the federal subsidy program for area (and Middle Eastern) studies in universities. As I've argued before, such a board is the very least Congress can do to assure some return on the taxpayers' investment in these programs. I spoke in defense of the bill on a panel in Washington on November 20, and I post my remarks here. In my address, I dispel...
  • Lack of Arabic Translators Hurting U.S.

    11/19/2003 2:00:51 AM PST · by Prodigal Son · 7 replies · 187+ views
    Guardian ^ | November 19, 2003 | Darlene Superville
    WASHINGTON (AP) - The shortage of Arabic translators in Iraq has made it harder for U.S. soldiers to protect themselves, jeopardized interrogations of suspected al-Qaida terrorists in U.S. custody in Cuba and left almost no one to defend American policy on Arab television stations. Despite an aggressive effort to recruit Arabic speakers in the two years since the Sept. 11 attacks, the U.S. government still suffers from a shortage that is hampering military, diplomatic and intelligence operations in the Middle East. Solutions seem hard to come by. Arabic and other languages of the Middle East are very different from English....
  • Arab experts (trustworthy translators)desperately needed in Iraq

    11/12/2003 10:39:29 PM PST · by FairOpinion · 84+ views
    Middle East Online ^ | Nov. 12, 2003 | Patrick Anidjar
    Arab experts desperately needed in Iraq FBI, CIA have started urgent hunt for trustworthy translators to help in interrogation of accused terrorists. US intelligence is desperate to find Arab speaking experts it can trust enough to help in the interrogation of accused terrorists and to crack codes that indicate a looming attack. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) have both started a urgent hunt for translators. A center is also being set up under a joint program reporting to the National Security Agency, according to media reports. The National Virtual Translation Center (www.nvtc.gov) comes onstream...
  • U.S. Agencies Surf for Translators

    11/06/2003 5:05:39 AM PST · by Prodigal Son · 3 replies · 175+ views
    Washington Post ^ | November 6, 2003d | John Mintz
    The CIA and the FBI are launching a program to help solve the shortage of linguists in Arabic and other languages, which officials say has become a crisis in the fight against terrorism. They're going online and creating a "virtual" network of bilingual university students, professors and other language experts. (snip) "Historically we brought linguists to the material, but now we'll get the material to the linguists," the new center's director, Everette Jordan, said in a recent interview. "It means we can move a lot faster."
  • Gov't Struggles to Find Arabic Speakers

    11/04/2003 5:32:17 PM PST · by Indy Pendance · 30 replies · 267+ views
    Foxnews ^ | 11-03-03 | Peter Brownfeld
    <p>WASHINGTON — For decades government agencies trained linguists in Russian to deal with America's Cold War enemy. Now that the new enemy primarily speaks Arabic, Washington has a lot of catching up to do to find reliable and fluent Arabic speakers.</p>
  • Lost in Translation(Arabic Military Translators)

    10/21/2003 2:50:40 AM PDT · by JerseyHighlander · 11 replies · 166+ views
    Newsweek via MSNBC ^ | 10/27/03 | Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff
    The clash of civilizations rages in some surprising places, and one of them is the large room in the FBI's Washington, D.C., Field Office that houses a unit known as CI-19. In one set of cubicles sit the foreign-born Muslims; across a partition is everyone else. They have the same vital job: to translate supersecret wiretaps of suspected terrorists and spies. But the 150 or so members of CI-19 (for Counterintelligence) segregate themselves by ethnicity and religion. Some of the U.S.-born translators have accused their Middle Eastern-born counterparts of making disparaging or unpatriotic remarks, or of making "mistranslations"--failing to translate...
  • Lack of Translators Means Terror Suspects' Intercepts can Take Months to be Deciphered

    10/19/2003 9:16:36 AM PDT · by Brian Mosely · 5 replies · 127+ views
    Press Release Source: Newsweek NEWSWEEK: Sources Say FBI's Lack of Translators Means Terror Suspects' Intercepts can Take Months to be Deciphered; Each Week Hundreds of Hours of Tapes Pile Up Sunday October 19, 12:06 pm ET 'The Jewels Might Be on a Diskette in a Secure Locker in Washington. It Keeps Some of Us Awake at Night,' Says FBI Agent NEW YORK, Oct. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, more than two years after the 9/11 attacks, the FBI is still woefully short of the translators it desperately needs to fight the war on terror, write Washington Bureau Chief Daniel Klaidman and...
  • Let's Go Terps! (How civilian translators are helping the military wage the peace in Iraq.)

    10/18/2003 3:47:07 PM PDT · by jocon307 · 7 replies · 175+ views
    The Weekly Standard (on line) ^ | 10/17/2003 | Christian Lowe
    THE LATEST CONCERNS at the Guantanamo Bay prison camp is a sharp reminder that America can't take security for granted--even at its most remote outposts. The capture of Ahmed Fathy Mehalba is even more unsettling because it involved a former Army soldier and naturalized U.S. citizen (by way of Egypt) who was employed as a civilian contractor by the military. The war on terror has presented the Pentagon with a dilemma: In order to fight an enemy, you have to first understand them--literally. With few Arabic speakers in its ranks, the Pentagon has resorted to contracting American citizens to act...
  • INTELLIGENCE OPERATIONS: Translator Troubles

    10/08/2003 4:37:32 PM PDT · by John Jorsett · 11 replies · 273+ views
    StrategyPage.com ^ | October 8, 2003
    The current spy scandal among Arab translators at Guantanamo was waiting to happen. Currently, the Department of Defense only has about a third of the Arab speaking translators it needs, and it has been frantically searching for other sources. Civilian translation firms are a good source, but these translators are usually not willing to work in Guantanamo or a combat zone. Moreover, many of the captured al Qaeda suspects speak a wide variety of Arab dialects, and many do not even speak "Standard Arabic" as a second language. It takes a highly experienced translator to deal with the dialects, and...
  • Pentagon probes it's Muslim school choice

    09/30/2003 1:39:25 PM PDT · by joesnuffy · 4 replies · 428+ views
    UPI ^ | Sept 30. '03 | Unknown
    Pentagon probes its Muslim school choice WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 (UPI) -- A school the Pentagon relied on to train Muslim military chaplains is under investigation for possible ties to al-Qaida, ABC News reported Tuesday. For the last six years, the Pentagon used an unaccredited school in Leesburg, Va., to train and certify most of its 13 Muslim chaplains. But in the last 18 months, the Graduate School of Islamic and Social Sciences also has been part of a federal investigation into possible financial ties to al-Qaida, ABC reported. One of the chaplains mentioned in correspondence between the Pentagon and the...
  • Potomac Watch: Case shows U.S. vulnerability in Arabic shortage

    09/27/2003 2:27:35 AM PDT · by sarcasm · 4 replies · 1,428+ views
    Seattle Post-Intelligencer ^ | September 27, 2003 | STEWART M. POWELL
    WASHINGTON -- The spying charge against an Air Force translator at the terrorist detention camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, underscores the U.S. government's shortage of Arabic language specialists at a time when the war on terrorism demands their skills.To offset the shortage of U.S.-trained Arabic translators, U.S. intelligence officials were relying on Syria-born airman Ahmad al-Halabi to carry out sensitive assignments involving the terrorism suspects.Al-Halabi, 24, who emigrated from Syria to Dearborn, Mich., in 1996 and joined the Air Force after high school graduation in 1999, faces 32 military charges, including some that could involve the death penalty, for alleged...
  • Gitmo GIs Converting To Islam?

    09/25/2003 4:32:26 PM PDT · by joesnuffy · 12 replies · 358+ views
    WorldNetDaily.com ^ | September 25, 2003 | WND
    UNDER GUARD AT GUANTANAMO Gitmo GIs converting to Islam? Algerian lawmaker claims prisoners influencing U.S. security personnel Posted: September 25, 2003 5:00 p.m. Eastern © 2003 WorldNetDaily.com In the wake of the arrest of two U.S. Muslim troops at the Guantanamo Bay prison camp on espionage charges, an Algerian lawmaker is claiming the terror-related detainees at the facility have convinced several of their guards to convert to Islam. Hassan Aribi says eight Algerian arrestees whose freedom he negotiated told him of the development, reports Islam Online. "They told me that the American guards were very sympathetic with them to the...
  • FBI chokes on backlog of untranslated Arabic

    08/11/2003 9:23:23 AM PDT · by Nachum · 22 replies · 303+ views
    WND ^ | August 11, 2003 | Paul Sperry
    WASHINGTON – A shortage of Arabic translators is not only hurting intelligence-gathering efforts in Iraq, where troops are hunting Saddam Hussein and armed resistors, but also at home, where FBI agents are trying to ferret out al-Qaida terrorist cells before Osama bin Laden can activate them for another attack here. Al-Qaida has trained up to 120,000 terrorists around the world, and some of them are inside the U.S., according to the recently declassified 9-11 report. The bureau is having a hard time recruiting fluent American-born translators, because the Arabic language is rarely studied in American colleges, FBI officials say. So...
  • Army recruiting Korean linguists: Shortage of Arabic translators called 'desperate'

    05/02/2003 1:21:28 AM PDT · by JohnHuang2 · 2 replies · 225+ views
    WorldNetDaily.com ^ | Friday, May 2, 2003 | By Paul Sperry
    WASHINGTON -- Not surprisingly, the U.S. Army is hard-pressed to recruit Arabic translators to help intelligence officers interrogate the thousands of Iraqi soldiers captured during the war. But the Army is also looking for linguists fluent in Korean and Indonesian dialects, WorldNetDaily has learned. Bush has named North Korea, which last week for the first time admitted possessing nuclear arms, as part of the so-called "axis of evil." The communist state is also on the State Department's terrorist blacklist. In his televised address last night aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln, Bush warned that any regime that harbors terrorists and develops...
  • The Translators

    03/31/2003 4:09:49 PM PST · by Commander8 · 2 replies · 152+ views
    QUESTION: Who were the translators of the King James Bible.
  • Isaiah 37:36

    03/28/2003 1:38:10 PM PST · by Commander8 · 3 replies · 132+ views
    QUESTION: Did dead people 'wake up' in the morning according to Isaiah 37:36 in the KJV?
  • Did translator shortage backfire? Inadequate preparation of Arabic-language interrogators

    03/22/2003 11:59:32 PM PST · by Salvation · 28 replies · 371+ views
    WorldNetDaily.com ^ | March 22, 2003, 11:00 p.m. | WorldNetDaily.com
    Did translator shortage backfire?WND exposed inadequate preparation of Arabic-language interrogators Posted: March 22, 200311:00 p.m. Eastern © 2003 WorldNetDaily.com As two Kuwaiti Arabic translators are held along with an American Muslim sergeant in the fragging attack at Camp Pennsylvania, questions are being raised about the Army's heavy reliance on local translators rather than qualified U.S. military Arabic speakers and interrogators. Back in September, WorldNetDaily first blew the whistle on the shortage of trained U.S. military translators and Arabic interrogators. Sources close to the preparations for a U.S. invasion of Iraq were concerned even last fall about what they perceived to be the...
  • QUESTION #14

    01/13/2003 7:06:55 PM PST · by Commander8 · 1 replies · 101+ views
    The Answer Book ^ | 1989 | Samuel C Gipp
    QUESTION: Did the translators of the Authorized Version claim to be inspired by God? ANSWER: No. But Biblically that does not mean that they could not have been inspired.
  • Military dismisses 6 gay Arabic linguists amid shortage of translators

    11/14/2002 1:12:58 PM PST · by mikenola · 94 replies · 424+ views
    AP ^ | 11-14-02
    <p>SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Nine Army linguists, including six trained to speak Arabic, have been dismissed from the military because they are gay.</p> <p>The soldiers' dismissals come at a time the military is facing a critical shortage of translators and interpreters for the war on terrorism.</p>
  • USA still not secure on 4 July as intelligence agencies struggle to find their form

    07/04/2002 2:51:07 PM PDT · by knighthawk · 8 replies · 156+ views
    Jane's ^ | July 04 2002
    Damning evidence of an ‘armchair’ approach within the FBI and CIA is reported in the latest edition of the authoritative Jane’s Islamic Affairs Analyst newsletter. The conclusion is that the USA on Independence Day (4 July) is scarcely more secure than it was during the tragic events of 11 September 2001. Senior intelligence staff and US government officials continue to criticise US intelligence failings, yet their new reforms (most recently outlined by President Bush in June) have so far done little to address the key problems, argues the report. Coleen Rowley, the FBI’s chief lawyer in Minneapolis, described in congressional...