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Keyword: transportationlist

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Historic maintenance shed could endanger road project

    07/25/2004 12:26:24 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 17 replies · 472+ views
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | July 25, 2004 | Associated Press
    NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) -- A Pennsylvania Department of Transportation maintenance shed will be considered for recognition as a historic place, an honor that would make it harder for PennDOT to widen a busy highway in suburban Philadelphia. The one-story brown brick garage, one of 67 county facilities built in 1936 as part of Gov. Gifford Pinchot's campaign to pave 20,000 miles of rural roads, will be the subject of a $10,000 study to determine if it belongs on the National Register of Historic Places. PennDOT will fund the study, which was ordered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The...
  • Free Republic "Bump List" Register

    09/30/2001 4:46:44 AM PDT · by John Robinson · 191 replies · 12,118+ views
    I have created a public register of "bump lists" here on Free Republic. I define a bump list as a name listed in the "To" field used to index articles. Free Republic Bump List Register
  • The War on Terror Goes to Sea

    07/06/2004 3:11:25 AM PDT · by .30Carbine · 22 replies · 1,198+ views
    FrontPage Magazine ^ | July 6, 2004 | Stephen Brown
    Unnoticed by most people outside the maritime industry, major new security measures came into effect last week for ships and seaports worldwide as part of the War on Terror. While airports and airlines have undergone extensive changes in security in response to 9/11, the world's 20,000 harbors and 55,000 ships had until July 1 to implement the new International Ship and Port Facility code. Designed by the International Maritime Organization at the urging of the United States, the ISPFS is meant to protect maritime facilities from terrorist attacks and from use as terrorist weapons. About 150 countries have signed on...
  • Wamp Legislation Includes Funds For Clean Fuels, Enterprise Connector

    07/25/2003 2:21:03 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 2 replies · 275+ views
    Chattanoogan.com ^ | July 24, 2003
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use.WASHINGTON - Congressman Zach Wamp (R-TN), the Co-Chairman of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (REEE) Caucus, announced Thursday that the 2004 Treasury-Transportation spending bill includes $1 million for Advanced Transportation Technology Institute (ATTI) in Chattanooga. He said it will begin the implementation of the East Tennessee Clean Transportation Initiative. According to Wamp, this funding will support the development of electric, hybrid-electric and other clean-fuel transportations to reduce pollution in the region and to improve air quality in places like the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. "As the Co-Chairman of the REEE,...
  • "Carpool program failing to gain members" -- $29,000 per car!!!

    07/02/2003 8:13:19 PM PDT · by hiho hiho · 68 replies · 674+ views
    Two years ago the city of Portland and Metro joined forces on a program which would match-up people who wanted to carpool. Mark Adams, who lives in the Vancouver area, used it to hook up with someone in his neighborhood who works within blocks of him, but he is the exception. Of the nearly 16-hundred commuters who have registered for the service, only about a dozen carpools have been formed. For a program that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars that amounts to a cost of about 29-thousand per carpool. Portland City Commissioner Jim Francesconi is concerned about the cost...
  • U.S. lawmakers say Bush transport plan too small

    05/15/2003 5:09:42 PM PDT · by fightinJAG · 2 replies · 165+ views
    Reuters via Forbes ^ | May 15, 2003 | Staff
    U.S. lawmakers say Bush transport plan too small Reuters, 05.15.03, 5:52 PM ET WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers pushing for billions of dollars in highway and transit funding this year on Thursday told Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta that a White House proposal fell far short of the nation's needs. Mineta earlier this week unveiled President Bush's $247 billion, six-year plan, calling it the largest transport funding proposal in U.S. history. A similar program dubbed "TEA-21" that expires this September provided $218 billion over six years. "Dollar-wise it looks great, but if you look at what you can do with the...
  • Maximize transit, minimize traffic

    05/09/2003 2:39:43 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 164 replies · 1,032+ views
    The Oregonian ^ | 05/06/03 | editorial
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. Some simplifying force in human nature loves to set up false dichotomies. You know what we're talking about. As in: You're a cat person, I'm a dog person. You're a wine person, I'm a beer person. You're a bus person, I'm a car person. Some of the criticism of two new light-rail extensions, planned for Clackamas County, stems from this kind of black-and-white thinking, carried over into the realm of public policy. Exaggerate the "transit vs. car" quarrel via a talk show or two, and before you know it, a thick...
  • Rendell urges U.S. aid for 2 maglev projects

    05/08/2003 9:03:53 AM PDT · by Willie Green · 32 replies · 880+ views
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | Thursday, May 08, 2003 | Karen MacPherson
    <p>WASHINGTON -- Gov. Ed Rendell said yesterday that the federal government should fund two magnetic levitation train projects, including one proposed for the Pittsburgh area.</p> <p>Rendell, in Washington to testify on state transportation needs, told reporters that Congress "shouldn't have to choose between competing projects."</p>
  • Maglev test track slated for Lawrence, Beaver counties

    04/19/2003 2:46:14 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 14 replies · 344+ views
    Pittsburgh Business Times ^ | Friday, Apr 18, 2003
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use.Construction is expected to begin this fall of a track in Lawrence and Beaver counties to test an updated maglev train. Power Superconductor Applications Corp., of New Castle, is announcing Friday that it and the Lawrence County Maglev Consortium have obtained exclusive use of the U.S. government's high-speed maglev test vehicle. Construction of a 7.5 mile test track in the counties will begin in October, according to Power Superconductor. The company will retrofit the government's maglev trainset with highly efficient cryogenic magnets and a newer levitation and propulsion system. This system has...
  • Light-rail project gains federal OK

    03/18/2003 8:41:02 AM PST · by Willie Green · 9 replies · 303+ views
    The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review ^ | Tuesday, March 18, 2003 | Jim Ritchie
    <p>The federal government has given the Port Authority permission to draft the final design of the $390 million project to extend the subway to the North Side by burrowing beneath the Allegheny River. Approval of the so-called North Shore Connector was delayed slightly by a paperwork glitch.</p>
  • Passenger Rail: Learning from Britain

    03/04/2003 1:14:37 PM PST · by B-Chan · 14 replies · 429+ views
    Self ^ | 2003.03.04 | B-chan
    Passenger Rail: Learning From the BritishIn the wake of the September 11 attacks, and with the continuing and alarming decline on the domestic air transport industry that preceded and followed the attacks, much discussion of alternatives to long-distance air travel has occurred. Such discussions generally center on domestic passenger rail service, and the same questions are generally asked: Why is American passenger rail service -- Amtrak -- so bad compared to that enjoyed by the Europeans and Japanese? Why can't Amtrak seem to run its lines profitably? And what business has the federal government running a rail passenger service in...
  • Union Switch is back on track as demand expands for its driverless rail technology

    03/02/2003 11:03:15 AM PST · by Willie Green · 5 replies · 259+ views
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | Sunday, March 02, 2003 | Jim McKay
    <p>The trains on Copenhagen's new Metro need no drivers. The cars wake themselves up in the morning to deliver rush-hour commuters and, when their rounds are done, they return themselves to the depot for cleaning.</p> <p>The electronic brains and other equipment for this automatic marvel that opened in October in Denmark's capital were designed in Pittsburgh by one of the city's oldest industrial firms, Union Switch & Signal.</p>
  • North Shore light rail project in jeopardy after loss of federal funding

    02/11/2003 1:02:34 PM PST · by Willie Green · 1 replies · 298+ views
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | Tuesday, February 11, 2003 | Joe Grata
    <p>Federal funding has come to an unexpected stop on plans to extend the Port Authority's light-rail network to the North Shore and the new Downtown convention center.</p> <p>The transit agency's chief executive officer, Paul Skoutelas, confirmed yesterday that the Federal Transit Administration has dropped the status of the $400 million project from "recommended" to "not recommended."</p>
  • Surge Upward in Rail Carloadings in 2003

    01/15/2003 8:09:40 PM PST · by Uncle George · 11 replies · 273+ views
    AAR ^ | 1/15/2003 | American Association of Railroads
    Ton milage is up 9.2 percent this year over last years total. This is the BELLWEATHER yardstick as how the economy is progressing. Looks like Bushenomics are starting to respond. Full article is at www.aar.org/
  • High-tech train 'flies without wings'

    01/10/2003 11:09:12 PM PST · by lewislynn · 6 replies · 184+ views
    High-tech train 'flies without wings' By Martin FacklerShanghai January 9 2003 You'd barely know you were moving if it weren't for the blurred farm houses and electric poles hurtling past the window. It's not until the digital speedometer of the world's first commercial magnetic-levitation train breaks 400 kph that any vibrations are noticeable. It's just as the voice on the loudspeaker said to passengers as they boarded: "You will be flying without wings." That's how it feels to ride the "maglev," unveiled to the Chinese public recently as Shanghai's newest prestige project, a $A2 billion German-built high-speed airport shuttle that uses...
  • Controversial new trains make debut (Remote-controlled freight trains)

    01/10/2003 12:04:35 PM PST · by chance33_98 · 10 replies · 282+ views
    Controversial new trains make debut By MATT WEISER, Californian staff writer Bakersfield, California Thursday January 09, 2003, 10:57:54 PM Remote-controlled freight trains, a controversial new technology already banned in some cities and blamed for several deaths, made their debut in Bakersfield Thursday amid warnings from local railroad engineers. Union Pacific Railroad delivered two of the special locomotives to Bakersfield Thursday, two weeks after a company spokesman said the system would not be deployed here. "It turns out we are doing it in Bakersfield and it will start on Monday," said Mike Furtney, the railroad's western region spokesman, correcting an...
  • The little commuter rail line that would

    12/28/2002 10:03:10 PM PST · by Coleus · 4 replies · 321+ views
    The little commuter rail line that would Saturday, December 28, 2002 By STEVE STRUNSKY Associated Press GLEN RIDGE - Since its completion in September, NJ Transit's Montclair Connection - first envisioned in 1929 - has allowed more commuters to ride trains directly into Manhattan. But three stations serving nearly 800 commuters were closed in the process, and now a former train conductor and several supporters are battling the agency to let him run his own railroad serving the shuttered stations. Jim Wilson, who also runs a small freight railroad, wants to reopen commuter service on what is known as the...
  • Trans-Siberian goes fully electric

    12/28/2002 1:51:51 PM PST · by DTA · 8 replies · 343+ views
    Vladivostok News ^ | 2002-12-26 | Anatoly Medetsky
    December 26, 2002 Trans-Siberian goes fully electric     By Anatoly Medetsky At a ceremony in a frozen village of the Russian Far East officials on Wednesday celebrated the end of electrification of the Trans-Siberian Railroad, an upgrade hoped to boost competitiveness of the world's longest rail track. The railroad has been advertising itself as the principal alternative to the sea route across the Indian Ocean and the Suez Canal that most businesses now use to ship their containers from Asia to Europe. Russia has been negotiating to extend the route across North Korea to the port of Pusan in...
  • Zhu, Schroeder to be on Maiden Trip of China's First Maglev Train

    12/22/2002 4:30:32 PM PST · by Willie Green · 25 replies · 348+ views
    People's Daily Online ^ | Sunday, December 22, 2002
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. As learned from Magnetic Levitation Transportation Development Co. Ltd Dec. 18, 2002 in Shanghai the maiden voyage for the world renowned Shanghai magnetic levitation train has been made definite to be in the morning of Dec. 31, 2002. But what makes it more eye-catching is that the levitation line will have two distinguished guests - Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder to be among the first batch of passengers. The two Prime ministers will be the first riders on the maglev train, experiencing the 7 minutes drive along...
  • Transit Talks Continue Past Midnight Deadline (MTA Strike Averted ... For Now)

    12/15/2002 9:42:53 PM PST · by Timesink · 16 replies · 954+ views
    NY1 ^ | December 16, 2002
    Transit Talks Continue Past Midnight Deadline DECEMBER 16TH, 2002 There will be no transit strike - at least not yet. With the morning plans of millions of commuters hanging in the balance, the MTA and New York City's transit workers are negotiating past the midnight hour in a last-ditch effort to avert a mass transit strike that could cripple the city at the height of the holiday season. Ed Watt, the secretary/treasurer of Transit Workers Union Local 100, announced at midnight that negotiators had made sufficient progess to continue their efforts past the midnight deadline. The progress, said Watt, had...
  • High-tech rail line key to Shanghai's mega-city dream

    12/13/2002 5:47:40 PM PST · by Willie Green · 4 replies · 379+ views
    The Straits Times, Singapore ^ | DEC 14, 2002 | David Hsieh
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. Bullet trains with speeds topping 400kmh will link several major cities in the proposed mega-Shanghai metropolis BEIJING - Shanghai has an ambitious plan - to create a mega-city, in which 15 cities within a 300-km radius of the Chinese metropolis would be linked by a complex network of rail and road. It boasts the world's first commercial magnetic-levitation (maglev) track linking Shanghai's Pudong Airport to the city centre. Costing US$1 billion (S$1.77 billion), the Shanghai maglev line will be completed by the end of 2003. Travelling at a speed of 430...
  • Light-rail project 65% complete, on time and within budget

    12/10/2002 11:05:19 AM PST · by Willie Green · 31 replies · 371+ views
    Minneapolis Star Tribune ^ | December 9, 2002 | Laurie Blake
    <p>The metro area's first light-rail line is 65 percent complete as the winter takes hold and the second construction season ends.</p> <p>Officials report that the Hiawatha Line is on time and within budget, but money continues to be tight.</p> <p>"The budget is a great concern," said Ed Hunter, director of the project for the Metropolitan Council. "It's always been a great concern."</p>
  • Experts consider air-rail transit

    11/30/2002 2:01:45 PM PST · by Willie Green · 1 replies · 273+ views
    Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, CA ^ | Friday, November 29, 2002 | BRENDA GAZZAR
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use.Intermodal system booming in Germany Regional aviation representatives are exploring the concept of an integrated aviation-rail system used in Germany for the Inland Empire and the rest of Southern California. "This just can't be a rail that is linked from Orange County to the Inland Empire, it has to be an integrated aviation system that moves people, goods and cargo,' said Peggy Ducey, chief executive officer of the Southern California Regional Airport Authority (SCRAA). Ducey, Ontario Councilman Paul Leon and five other airport and government officials, went to Germany earlier this month...
  • Seattle Monorail Wins

    11/19/2002 3:40:32 PM PST · by BurbankKarl · 30 replies · 343+ views
    SEATTLE - A proposal to increase the motor vehicle excise tax to build a monorail through parts of the city has passed by a narrow margin. Bob Roegner, manager of King County Records, Elections and Licensing Services, said the monorail measure was ahead by 868 votes by mid-afternoon Tuesday. While a handful of votes remained to be counted, "there are not enough votes to change the result," he said. "It's a great day for the city," said Tom Weeks, chairman of the board of Elevated Transportation Company. "It's a grass-roots movement that's going to change the face of the city...
  • (Seattle)Monorail losing by three votes in latest count(out of 185,000 votes cast)

    11/18/2002 9:04:01 PM PST · by Diddle E. Squat · 12 replies · 328+ views
    Seattle Times ^ | 11/18/02 | Seattle Times staff
    New Seattle vote counts released at 3:43 p.m. today show the proposal to build a 14-mile city monorail trailing by three votes. There are 92,435 ballots in favor of a monorail and 92,438 against. Remaining to be counted are perhaps 1,000 to 2,000 "special ballots," which include those ballots given to people who couldn't reach the right polling place on Election Day or who are legal voters but could not be located in voter logs kept at the polls. There are around 6,000 such ballots in King County as a whole. Another update is due tomorrow, with official final counts...
  • Airport officials hope to put new train on track

    11/13/2002 5:40:36 PM PST · by Willie Green · 4 replies · 248+ views
    San Bernardino County Sun ^ | Monday, November 11, 2002 | VINCE LOVATO
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. Victorville could house depot for speedy Southland-Las Vegas link A revolutionary high-speed train that generates its own electricity with a jet engine and reaches speeds of at least 150 mph could be in place years before a long-awaited magnetic train system could connect Southern California and Las Vegas. The jet train would be 80 percent cheaper to build and 20 percent lighter than any other full-size passenger train, and unlike the Maglev, which has been talked about for a couple of decades, it could be running in a few years, officials...
  • Mayors back high-speed California-Las Vegas train

    10/29/2002 9:23:11 PM PST · by Willie Green · 10 replies · 310+ views
    The Reno Gazette-Journal ^ | 10/29/2002 | Associated Press
    <p>Four California and Nevada mayors pledged their support Tuesday for a futuristic magnetic-levitation train linking Las Vegas with Southern California, but there was little indication the project would get needed federal funding.</p> <p>The mayors'meeting presented a unified front in hopes of winning nearly $1 billion in government money over Pittsburgh and Baltimore developers, whose bids for a high-speed"maglev"train have run into opposition from local groups.</p>
  • New Fuel Cell Bus Takes to Road in Japan

    10/22/2002 9:34:29 AM PDT · by zx2dragon · 2 replies · 212+ views
    Fuel Cell Today ^ | October 21, 2002 | Mark Cropper
    On Friday 18 October Toyota Motor Corp. announced that it had begin public road tests here of the FCHV-BUS2, a fuel cell bus it has jointly developed with Hino Motors Ltd. In contrast with conventional buses, the bus is quiet and very clean. It emits no nitrogen oxides, particulates or carbon dioxide. Toyota was granted permission to conduct the tests from the Japanese Transport Ministry at the end of September. The FCHV-BUS2 is based on a 60-passenger diesel model made by Toyota subsidiary Hino. The two companies worked together to outfit this model with a fuel cell system. The FCHV-BUS2...
  • Looking beyond Amtrak

    10/03/2002 10:55:57 PM PDT · by JohnHuang2 · 6 replies · 241+ views
    Washington Times ^ | Friday, October 4, 2002 | Christopher Gleason
    <p>As our nation's passenger rail service continues its collapse into financial and operational crisis it is clearer than ever that dysfunctionality is an integral part of Amtrak's culture.</p> <p>To understand Amtrak's institutional dysfunctionality, one need look no further than recent events, such as the withdrawal from service of the Acela, several major accidents and loss of life and the mortgaging of one of its premier properties, New York City's Penn Station, to fund operations.</p>
  • Transit trouble – in many modes

    08/19/2002 11:50:14 AM PDT · by JohnHuang2 · 1 replies · 123+ views
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | Monday, August 19, 2002 | By Ron Scherer | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor
    NEW YORK - A well-known name in transportation saw its operating profits drop by 95 percent from a year ago. It faces competition from deep discounters who offer fares so low it's impossible to meet them. And, as competitors declare bankruptcy, the value of its assets has been steadily declining. No, it's not another airline. This time it's Greyhound Lines, the nation's largest bus company. In fact, whether it is planes, trains, or buses, many of the nation's long-haul transportation providers are either operating in the red or just barely making money. A good portion of the cause is the...
  • Fast Train to Nowhere

    08/17/2002 1:33:06 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 13 replies · 332+ views
    The New York Times ^ | August 16, 2002 | editorial
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. David Gunn, the man credited with turning around the New York City subway system in the 1980's, has found an equally daunting challenge. Amtrak, which he has led since May, seems to have cornered the market on self-inflicted debacles this year. Just as passenger rail traffic was soaring in the wake of the Sept. 11 airliner hijackings, Amtrak suffered two nasty derailments and the sidelining of its brand-new fleet of high-speed trains. The setbacks, coming at a time when the railroad's future hinges on an upcoming budget showdown in Congress, are...
  • ELECTRIC CARS COME OF AGE

    08/17/2002 10:21:43 AM PDT · by forest · 43 replies · 987+ views
    Fiedor Report On the News #283 ^ | 8-18-02 | Doug Fiedor
    Some folks think that because I drive a little 4WD vehicle I do not care about good transportation. That is not exactly true, of course. Within the past couple weeks, I have ridden in two greatly different styled electric vehicles. However, I was also in an older GTO and a Plymouth Roadrunner -- both muscle-cars with four on the floor and duel quads. Fact is, I grew up drag racing. Today, I am more interested in other things. For instance, a couple years ago I reported a little about my visit with a Jeep Commander all electric fuel cell vehicle.(1)...
  • Passenger Traffic Remains Down in July

    08/17/2002 7:49:29 AM PDT · by Lessismore · 8 replies · 236+ views
    Washington, August 15, 2002—The Air Transport Association (ATA) reported that systemwide revenue passenger miles (RPMs) declined 8.4 percent in July, versus the same month in 2001. Domestic revenue passenger miles declined 7.1 percent and international RPMs decreased 11.6 percent. Revenue passenger mile is the industry term used to quantify the volume of business; one RPM equals one fare-paying passenger transported one mile. Systemwide passenger enplanements fell 10.3 percent in July. The number of enplanements declined 10.6 percent domestically and 7.2 percent internationally. “Traffic recovery in the airline industry has stalled; July was another month with no progress in returning to...
  • Trains would make better sense than short-hop airplane flights

    08/16/2002 8:16:09 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 59 replies · 849+ views
    The DesMoines Register ^ | 08/15/2002 | Register Editorial Board
    <p>The airline industry's recent problems reveal the need for reliable transportation alternatives, including passenger trains.</p> <p>Flights of under an hour between major cities make no sense when it takes an hour to get to the airport and an hour to get through security. Still, Amtrak, the nation's excuse for a passenger railroad, has a long way to go before it is close to offering serious inter-city passenger service with the convenience and speed that airline passengers expect.</p>
  • A Railroader’s Plan for Amtrak (Mine: Privatization with a difference)

    08/16/2002 6:18:19 PM PDT · by CedarDave · 29 replies · 536+ views
    Trains Magazine (free registration required) ^ | August 16, 2002 | Bill Stephens
    A railroader’s plan for Amtrak Susquehanna’s Walter Rich thinks Class 1s should get back in the passenger business — but not in the traditional way by Bill Stephens Walter Rich — the man who transformed sleepy short line New York, Susquehanna & Western into a key transcontinental link for double-stack traffic — has crafted what seems to be a sensible plan for saving Amtrak. At first blush, the plan seems to be a non-starter. That’s because Rich envisions having the Class 1 freight railroads resume operating passenger trains for the first time since they fled the money-losing passenger business...
  • Locally-built maglev train in test runs

    08/16/2002 12:57:11 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 19 replies · 825+ views
    The Daytona Beach News-Journal ^ | Friday, August 16, 2002 | DEBBIE MESSINA -- The Virginian-Pilot
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. NORFOLK -- With a few computer keystrokes, the nation's first magnetic levitation train lifts and slowly moves down a short stretch of track at Old Dominion University. These early test runs at about 4 mph along the length of the adjacent tennis courts are a far cry from what the train's inventor hopes to have in service by the end of September. Still, it's a start. The blue and white bullet-nosed train levitates. It moves. It stops. It reverses direction. But it still bumps and rattles a bit. Tony Morris, president...
  • Calif drivers worry new monitoring system threatens privacy

    08/10/2002 1:32:09 PM PDT · by hattend · 11 replies · 397+ views
    Associated press via Sierra Times ^ | Aug 9th 2002 | Associated Press
    OAKLAND, Calif - A new $37 million system will soon track drivers' movements along highways in Northern California -- whether they like it or not. The traffic sensor system, which should begin operating next month, will make it possible to provide realtime information about some of the nation's worst congestion to drivers through their cell phones, over the airwaves and on the Internet, and gather better data for transportation planners. But despite government assurances, it's also raising fears that drivers' privacy will be invaded. Similar to systems in Houston and New York, the project will track electronic toll payment devices...
  • In Bay area, toll passes leave privacy gate open

    08/09/2002 11:28:17 PM PDT · by kattracks · 3 replies · 226+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 8/10/02 | Karen Gaudette, AP
    <p>OAKLAND, Calif. — San Francisco Bay Area officials are planning to track 250,000 drivers during their commutes, raising fears about an invasion of privacy.</p> <p>"I personally am a little creeped out by it," said interior designer Heidi Hirvonen-White, who crosses the Golden Gate Bridge while driving between Tiburon and San Francisco. "In today's society, it seems like any sort of code or whatnot can be broken."</p>
  • Maglev train at ODU takes first, slow slides

    08/09/2002 2:33:19 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 9 replies · 374+ views
    The Virginian-Pilot ^ | August 9, 2002 | DEBBIE MESSINA
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. NORFOLK -- With a few computer keystrokes, the nation's first magnetic levitation train lifts and slowly moves down a short stretch of track at Old Dominion University. These early test runs at about 4 mph along the length of the adjacent tennis courts are a far cry from what the train's inventor hopes to have in service by the end of September. Still, it's a start. Click here! The blue and white bullet-nosed train levitates. It moves. It stops. It reverses direction. But it still bumps and rattles a bit. Tony...
  • OF RAIL, LYING AND LEMONS

    08/08/2002 2:57:45 PM PDT · by backhoe · 17 replies · 205+ views
    Independence Institute ^ | August 8, 2002 | WENDELL COX
    For Immediate Release August 8, 2002  OF RAIL, LYING AND LEMONSBY WENDELL COX It's the same story over and over. Transit districts ask the voters to approve taxes to build expensive rail systems. The voters consent, and get half of what they bargained for --- the tax. As for the promised rail system, it almost always turns out that there just isn't enough money to deliver on the promises. Or, transit board members will be told by consultants that a rail line can be built for a certain amount of money. But invariably, after the local political establishment has committed...
  • Getting the rails back on track

    08/06/2002 8:37:21 AM PDT · by JohnHuang2 · 2 replies · 199+ views
    Washington Times ^ | Tuesday, August 6, 2002 | Fred L. Smith
    <p>As the recent crash of an Amtrak passenger train in Maryland illustrates, our nation's railroad tracks are in dire need of maintenance or replacement. But in all the discussions over how to rescue the ailing passenger rail system, and amid calls for re-regulating the nation's reasonably healthy freight rail system, one policy move has received too little attention: the repeal of the unfair diesel fuel tax now paid by both passenger and freight rail.</p>
  • Administration Approves Stiff Penalties for Diesel Engine Emissions, Angering Industry

    08/02/2002 10:35:13 PM PDT · by JohnHuang2 · 9 replies · 305+ views
    New York Times ^ | Saturday, August 3, 2002 | By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
    August 3, 2002 Administration Approves Stiff Penalties for Diesel Engine Emissions, Angering IndustryBy KATHARINE Q. SEELYE ASHINGTON, Aug. 2 — Over the fierce objections of the long-haul trucking industry and Republican lawmakers, including Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, the Bush administration has approved hefty new penalties for the makers of diesel engines that do not reduce their emission pollutants by October. The penalties run up to $12,000 for every engine that is made after Oct. 1 and violates federal emission standards. Environmentalists hailed the move as a strong step toward curbing diesel pollutants, which contribute to thousands of cases of asthma,...
  • Exploring the path of a future monorail line

    07/29/2002 3:44:39 PM PDT · by Willie Green · 12 replies · 474+ views
    SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER ^ | Monday, July 29, 2002 | GEORGE FOSTER AND KATHY MULADY
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. From Crown Hill to West Seattle, the route of the proposed monorail will raise commuter hopes -- and a few eyebrows A handful of plotters and dreamers in the mid-1990s wanted to expand on the 1962 World's Fair Monorail concept and "rise above it all." The Elevated Transportation Co. will give final approval to a proposed new system next Monday. And the City Council must approve putting it on the Nov. 5 ballot, along with a 1.4 percent Seattle motor-vehicle excise tax to pay for it. P-I reporters George Foster and...
  • Rapid transit plan on fast track (another needless boondoggle)

    07/28/2002 2:30:58 PM PDT · by Clinging Bitterly · 15 replies · 491+ views
    Eugene Red Guard ^ | July 28, 2002 | RANDI BJORNSTAD
    July 28, 2002 Rapid transit plan on fast track By RANDI BJORNSTAD The Register-Guard   Forward storyPrinter- friendly version It's been a slow process crammed with designs and redesigns, dozens of open houses seeking public opinion and untold hours of deliberation by local officials. But the Lane Transit District will finally break ground this fall on the first leg of its long-awaited Bus Rapid Transit system. Two years from now, riders should be able to whisk between LTD's downtown Eugene terminal and a new bus station on South A Street, just east of the Pioneer Parkway couplet in downtown Springfield. And...
  • Railroaded to Nowhere [Mass Transit]

    07/22/2002 11:17:25 AM PDT · by xsysmgr · 2 replies · 162+ views
    Tech Central Station ^ | 07/22/2002 | Joel Schwartz
    Mass transit accounts for only about one percent of travel in the U.S. But the American Public Transit Association, the national lobbying organization for transit agencies, recommends America increase transit use ten-fold to match European levels. The result, according to APTA, would be lower transportation costs and less air pollution. The report, "Conserving Energy and Preserving the Environment: The Role of Public Transportation," is flawed at almost every level. However, its most serious failing is that it begs the question of how motorists could be enticed to shift en masse to transit in the first place. APTA never asks...
  • Federal Gas Tax Cut Will Increase Traffic Congestion & Threaten Highway Safety

    07/22/2002 7:43:08 AM PDT · by vannrox · 21 replies · 825+ views
    American Road and Transportation Builders Association ^ | FR post 22 July 2002 | By John W. Wight
    Federal Gas Tax Cut Will Increase Traffic Congestion & Threaten Highway Safety By John W. Wight Traffic accidents are the leading cause of death for Americans age 6 to 28 and result in more permanent disabling injuries than any other type of accident. This serious public health situation could become even worse if several proposals recently floated on Capitol Hill ever become law. The price of gasoline has been climbing steadily in recent weeks and could go even higher before the summer travel season ends. It is well understood that the price increase is due to a shortage of...
  • Price tag of transit is soaring

    07/21/2002 11:48:42 AM PDT · by southernnorthcarolina · 23 replies · 300+ views
    Charlotte Observer ^ | July 21, 2002 | Dianne Whiacre
    Cost of transit plan more than doubles DIANNE WHITACRE Staff Writer <<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>> This story happens to concern Charlotte, but it could be "Anytown, USA," particularly if the "Anytown" in question has delusions of grandeur... aspirations of "greatness" that must be validated by the establishment of rail transit. Never mind that this 18th-century technology is hideously expensive (both with regard to initial cost and ongoing operations); never mind that rail transit never comes close to paying for itself; never mind that rail transit seldom if ever makes an appreciable dent in road construction. If you're going to be a big-league city,...
  • ATA Monthly Passenger Traffic Report

    07/15/2002 8:42:34 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 2 replies · 160+ views
    June 2002 versus a year ago: Passenger emplanements -- down 10.4% Passenger revenue miles -- down 8.4% Airline travel has been pretty stable at down 7 to 10% versus a year ago for the last few months. However, this is compounded by lower average ticket prices, since the full-fare travelers aren't coming back.
  • A French lesson on rail transit

    07/05/2002 4:23:15 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 17 replies · 252+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | July 5, 2002 | Derrick Z. Jackson
    <p>DAVID GUNN wishes he could be confused with Louis Gallois. Here in the United States, Gunn, the new president of Amtrak, has emerged from his gloomy jousts with Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta with the impression that even if Amtrak survives, it will be an indentured serf leaning on a scythe and gazing longingly at the Ford Expedition rolling into the castle.</p>
  • U.S. Fears Al Qaeda Cyber Attacks (A MUST-READ)

    06/26/2002 3:56:37 PM PDT · by Timesink · 111 replies · 930+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | June 26, 2002 | Barton Gellman
    [...]Unsettling signs of al Qaeda's aims and skills in cyberspace have led some government experts to conclude that terrorists are at the threshhold of using the Internet as a direct instrument of bloodshed. The new threat bears little resemblance to familiar financial disruptions by hackers responsible for viruses and worms. It comes instead at the meeting points between computers and the physical structures they control.By disabling or taking command of floodgates in a dam, for example, or of substations handling 300,000 volts of electric power, U.S. analysts believe an intruder could use virtual tools to destroy real-world lives and property....